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Remembered Today:

The invasion of Clacton


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auchonvillerssomme

You can just read this I think.

post-11859-0-30299700-1360269480_thumb.j

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  • 2 months later...

The slouch hats showing remarkable precognition !

Hello,

The Slouch Hats were still an army field dress issue during this time. The hats widespread use began during the 2nd Boer War.

Cheers

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There is a comprehensive official report on these manoeuvres, held at the National Archives: WO279/8. A printed and bound volume 162 pages long, lots of statistics, orders of battle, plans etc. I happened to need to look at it a couple of weeks ago.

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Very interesting topic - the use of boats with a front ramp that lowers is interesting, of course i've seen it on photos of WW2 and later motorised landing craft but never on anything WW1 (disregarding the X Lighter which had a ramp well above the water level), especially something presumably rowed - does anyone have more information on these?

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I didn't think, when I first posed my questions, how this thread would develop.

Many thanks to all who have contributed to so fascinating an area of study.

I have learned a lot (but then, I always do when I log into the Forum).

Bruce

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  • 1 year later...

In September 1904, invasion manoeuvres had taken place in Essex with the ‘Blue Army’ under the command of General Sir John French landing at Clacton-on-Sea, overwhelming the defending ‘Red Army’, and ‘taking’ Colchester before making a strategic withdrawal. The local population, and some journalists, were less impressed than the military observers, choosing to refer to the manoeuvres as the “Battle of Letspretendia" I believe that the manoeuvres also encouraged the development of the Cyclist Corps, as soldiers on bikes were used in successful scouting exercises.

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This blog entry includes a picture of the plaque marking the 1904 invasion which took place in the presence of the Duke and Duchess of Connaught and their two daughters and son.

http://silvermud.wordpress.com/2012/03/23/walking-the-essex-coast-4-18/

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  • 4 months later...
Steven Broomfield

Out of interest (and I've obviously not read it yet), but on arriving home this evening I found the latest edition of the Journal of the Society for Army Historical Research has what looks like a very good article on the Army Manoeuvres of 1912, by Simon Batten, who, it says in his biographical notes, is currently writing a book on the use of manoeuvres in the lead-up to the GW. The article contains some interesting Orders of Battle and equipment, a good map and some photos. It covers about 22 pages.

SAHR website here: http://www.sahr.co.uk/

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I am sure that I have read somewhere that prior to Gallipoli in 1915, the Army and Navy had only ever staged one attempted amphibious landing, it being in 1908 and that it involved landing at Clactor-on-sea in Essex.

1. Why Clacton?

2. What happened?

3. How successful was it, and were any lessons learned?

4. Where can I find out more about the landing?

Any and all assistance greatfully received.

Bruce

It was 1904 Bruce. Take a look here:

http://www.history-in-pictures.co.uk/store/index.php?_a=viewProd&productId=3374

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Many thanks again to all contributors!

Bruce

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  • 2 years later...
On 15.4.2013 at 10:55, RobL said:

Very interesting topic - the use of boats with a front ramp that lowers is interesting, of course i've seen it on photos of WW2 and later motorised landing craft but never on anything WW1 (disregarding the X Lighter which had a ramp well above the water level), especially something presumably rowed - does anyone have more information on these?

Hi Rob,

 

just if it is still of interest: The boats are so called "horse-boats", here the "old" type built from wood.

 

Have a look here:

Regards,

 

Karsten

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  • 1 year later...
  • 1 year later...
museumtom

Fabulous footage. Thank you for posting.

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10 hours ago, PVT.Snafu said:

 

Great footage, thanks for posting. Some of the early scenes show transportation & deployment of MKII or Clauson pontoons which were used up until 1924; some drawings & further details can be found in 'UK Military Bridging – Floating Equipment' (ThinkDefence.co.uk) which makes the comment that dedicated RE pontoon units were - understandably - '... amongst the largest soldiers in the Army because they needed to be physically able to lift the heavy pontoon equipments. These specially constituted units acquitted themselves well in the South African wars and by virtue of their size and power, won no less than thirteen inter service tug of war championships!' 

 

NigelS

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