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Chris_Baker

Hospitals in the United Kingdom

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Frank_East

B.S

Buxton Hydro Hotel.I think I can recognise the entrance.

Did the hotel pass through the hands of the Manchester City Corporation Electricity Department as a training establishment and then end its days in a simlar capacity for the CEGB?

Regards

Frank East

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BeppoSapone
B.S

Buxton Hydro Hotel.I think I can recognise the entrance.

Did the hotel pass through the hands of the Manchester City Corporation Electricity Department as a training establishment and then end its days in a simlar capacity for the CEGB?

Regards

Frank East

Frank

Afraid that I can't help you off the top of my head. I am from Sussex, have lived here for just over two years, and am in the process of moving.

However, my partners aunt, who is pushing 80, may know. She has lived here since being evacuated from Liverpool in 1939. I will ask her when I next see her, which will be in a day or two.

In the meanwhile, a search of the net has produced what I think is the same hotel, from another angle. This alone may clear up the query.

The original of this postcard was posted by "F.M.H." to his friend Albert - "Pte. A. Bleasdale, 1045860, 2nd G. C. D., Bramshott Camp, Bramshott, Haslemore."

Anyone recognise the unit?

post-6-1069536272.jpg

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Chris_B

John Henry Storer - a victim of "W" Gas - was admitted to Torbay Hospital Torquay 24.3.18

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BeppoSapone
B.S

Buxton Hydro Hotel.I think I can recognise the entrance.

Did the hotel pass through the hands of the Manchester City Corporation Electricity Department as a training establishment and then end its days in a simlar capacity for  the CEGB?

Regards

Frank East

Frank

As promised, I have spoken to my partner's aunt about the hotels in Buxton.

Firstly, no problem with the "Palace Hotel", which was the Granville in WW1. In WW2 it was occupied by evacuated civil servants "from the south" - which ones exactly? Yet to be discovered.

Then what you, and most other people, call the "Buxton Hydro Hotel". As far as I can tell, this did not exist as such. There were at least three hotels with "Hydro" as a part of their name, and some people from 'out of town' have called all three of them the "Buxton Hydro Hotel".

The first "Buxton Hydro" was the "Buxton Spa Hydro" aka "The Spa Hotel". This was in Hartington Road and is now demolished. This housed part of the Granville Canadian Hospital, and is the first "Hydro" photo I posted, the one you thought you recognised.

The second "Buxton Hydro" was the "Peak Hydro". This is the second "Hydro" postcard I posted. I thought it was another view of "Buxton Spa Hydro", and I was wrong. It is another building completely. It is still here too. It was a Canadian hospital in WW1, and by 1939 it was "Buxton Public Library". It remained so until at least the late 1960s. It is now "Buxton Museum and Art Gallery". I had a look this afternoon and, without doubt, it is the same building.

The third "Buxton Hydro" was "Oliver's Hydro" which was situated in the London Road. This no longer exists. However, in 1953 or 1954 it was taken over by the Electricity Board and was used as a centre for training. People used to come on residential courses etc. I don't know anything about the role of "Oliver's Hydro" in WW1 - yet.

There was also another large hotel called the "Empire Hotel", now demolished. This was used by the Canadians in WW1. It was occupied by homeless people after WW2. These "squatters" used to claim that the place was haunted by the ghosts of Canadians who had died there in WW1. I don't know anything about ghosts, but the "Canadians who had died" suggests it was yet another hospital.

There were also Canadians - staff from the hospitals? - living in requisitioned houses and billeted on local people. There was also a large Canadian "Discharge Depot" here.

This place must have been 'knee deep' in Canucks in 1918!

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Frank_East

B.S

Thanks for the information on the Buxton hotels.You seemed to have amassed some interesting historical knowledge on Buxton's transformation into a military base.The forces must have left their mark at the requisitions.Quite often properties were left in a poor state on being returned to their owners after the war.

As I said I thought I recognised the entrance to the Training Centre as being the hotel you initially posted.You mentioned the actual hotel that was converted to the Training Centre as being on London Road and that jogged my memory as I remembered it being on London Road.

Buxton was very cold in the winter and the first snow resulted in it being cut off with the A6 road from Bakewell being the first road to close.I can imagine that the winter weather caused the military authoritories some problems getting access to the requisitioned hotels in both world wars.

Ah, the Palace Hotel,I remember it as a watering hole, always a genteel place but one where you could sneak a midnight dip.

Regards

Frank East

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Stuart Brown

Location not known but added for information.

Stuart

post-6-1070312757.jpg

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HERITAGE PLUS

Two VAD run Somerset War Hospitals:

Countess Temple's Hospital, Newton Park, Newton St.Loe Nr.Bath

Now part of Bath Spa University College

Gurney Court, Nr. West Harptree

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Stuart Brown

Came across this mention where a soldier was :-

Fort Pitt Hospital, Chatham.

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Stuart Brown

Posted to Cpl Beattie,

R.F.A.

26 Ward,

Royal Bath Hospital,

Harrogate.

Sender:-

"According to rumours I think it

is time You got up.

From one who knows."

post-6-1072899589.jpg

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jimmyjames

There were eight VAD hospitals in Cheltenham, in addition to the town's General Hospital. Between them the VAD provided over over 960 beds at peak capacity. The most famous being the one sited at Cheltenham Racecourse.

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Desmond7

Waveney Hospital Ballymena was used as an overspill hospital during WW1. Will try and find out more details.

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salientpoints

How about St Dunstan's, (down the road from me) in Ovingdean - founded in 1915 by Sir Arthur Pearson (of pearson media fame). This centre was built to care for those blinded in WW1. The current building is a fantasitc art deco style building on the cliff tops which was finished in 1938 -

thumb_21.jpg

http://www.st-dunstans.org.uk

Ryan

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Muerrisch

Not my scene, but I just dropped into this thread for a shufti: magnificent, this is just what we do best. This is a huge potential resource for anyone contemplating an article, a dissertation or whatever. First class, and clearly not finished yet.

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Matt Dixon

Further to Terry Reeves' post, I know that the Great Hall of the University of Birmingham was used as a ward for patients from what is now the Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Edgbaston.

I have seen photos of what is now Birmingham Central Police station (Steelhouse Lane by the new Childrens Hospital) of wounded troops in the alley ways that run through the underground custody block.

I have a feeling that Cadbury Manor, and Sarehole Manor were also used.

(Incidentally I was born in No 15 Canadian hospital, Taplow)

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David Filsell

An amazing accumulation of material. But hell to use if you wish to add and not duplicate. Is there any chance of a single consolidated alpa list to which all contributions could be added. It not as if any of us have anything else to do is it!

David

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Chris_Baker

I'm working on it, David. It's a hell of a thing to try to categorise and record. I hope to release the updated web page(s) on it in perhaps 4 weeks or so.

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Guest FrankB

Hi Chris,

I found Netley in the above list but didn't see an entry for Woolwich ... is there one?

My grandfather was injured at High Wood (15th September 1916) and went back

(via an American hospital at "Cammiers"?) to Netley for several operations then

to "R.H. Hospital Woolwich" (where he had his 7th operation).

I often wonder if he met any of his past patients in his visits - he started off as a

stretcher-bearer and served at Aubers Ridge, Festubert, Givenchy, Maroc sector,

Loos, Vermelles, Hohenzollern, Hulloch and Vimy before re-training as infantry.

Frank

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Richard Osgood

Hi all,

an image of the 1st Eastern General Hospital at Cambridge by J Palmer Clark. THe "uniform" of the chap with the stick intrigues me - can Pals offer any comments.

all best

Richard

post-6-1074092605.jpg

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Richard Osgood

closer up image of this chap in above post

cheers

Richard

post-6-1074092648.jpg

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BottsGreys

Chris:

This photo is inscribed "Little Court, Dec. 1914, Belgian Soldiers." I wasn't familiar with it, but a Google search found that Little Court is an Edwardian country house in Charminster, Dorchester, which is currently being used as a Bed & Breakfast.

(You may know all of this). I also have a photo of soldiers in the "Gas Ward, Military Hospital, Princess Street, Manchester, July 16, 1915."

Chris

post-6-1074142389.jpg

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BottsGreys

Sorry, didn't mean for the image to load so large--got to hone my skills.

Chris

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purley

WW1 Hospitals in Berkshire:-

Basildon Park was being used as a hospital for Guards Officers. [RM 1/1/16]

Caversham (Cliff House) a country annexe to the Freemasons Hospital in London with 25 beds - well equipped for massage and electrical treatment.

Newbury District Hospital had admitted 367 wounded soldiers in 1915. They had built an annexe with 196 beds. [RM 25/3/16] Assisted by det 54 of the Red Cross.

Sandhurst (Ardington House) - a convalescent home for VAD Nurses

Steventon (Milton Hall) - a large hospital of 220 beds financed entirely by the Singer brothers. Had a staff of 40 and treated 4560 patients.

Sunninghill (Silwood Park) - an officers convalescent hospital with 20 beds.

Windsor (Fern Hill) an officers convalescent hospital with 20 beds.

Windsor - King Edward VII Hospital - assisted by det 66 of the Red Cross

Windsor - Queensmead - run by Lady Churchill at her own expense. Ran from Sept 14 to 1916 when all her male servants were called up. She then transferred her attentions to the King Edward VII hospital.

FROM THE RED CROSS REPORT IN 1919

The Berkshire Branch of the British Red Cross Society made a unique contribution to the war effort, almost all of it being on a voluntary basis. The branch had a number of detachments around the county and the majority of these found premises and set up an auxillary voluntary hospital. Other detachments formed the staff of field hospitals and saw service on all the fronts and on some of the hospital ships. The men’s detachments on the whole provided escorts, convoys and transport around the country, moving the sick and injured between hospitals and from ambulance trains to local hospitals.

At the outbreak of war there were 24 women’s detachments and 7 for men with a total personnel of 767. The first priority was to set up auxiliary hospitals and raise funds and beg, borrow or steal equipment to equip them. The hospitals that were set up across the county were as follows,

Abingdon - located at “Tesdale House”. Two adjacent houses were also rented. This was noted as the most economically run hospital in the county.

Ascot - located initially in the grand stand of the race course but later moved to “?Sandridge” Field Marshall Lord Roberts was present at the opening.

Binfield - located at Popeswood.

Bisham - located at Bisham Abbey

Bracknell - located first at “Saunders Lodge” and later transferred to “Oaklea”

Caversham - located at “St Anne’s Hall”

Crowthorne - located at “Heatherside”

Didcot - situated at Rectory Cottage In addition 400 men were inocculated.

Donnington - located at Albion House. Specialised in treating paralysis.. It had an annexe which was kept on after the war as a club for pensioners.

Englefield - in the Long Gallery of Englefield House. Run by Dame Elizabeth Benyon. the wife of the Lord Lieutenant. She was President of the Berkshire Red Cross until her death

Faringdon - Opened first at “The Pump House” and later moved to “Kitemore”?

Finchampstead - located at Ridgelands

Hungerford - located at the Technical Institute. - was set up and equipped initially in 48 hours and received a special telegram of appreciation from the Commandant at Tidworth.

Kintbury - located at “Barton Court”

Maidenhead - this was the largest and best equipped auxiliary hospital in the county As well as its in patients it also treated 3320 out patients, for which no grant was forthcoming and 35 war pensions outpatients. It opened with 43 beds, increased to 50 in 1916, then to 80 in April 1917 and 100 in Jan 1918. The adjacent drill hall was converted in May 1918 doubling the number of beds. Supported by public appeals and Red Cross funds. The premises were lent by the Board of Education.

Mortimer - located at “The Club” used initially for Belgians.

Newbury - located at “Park House”. It was run in conjunction with the Order of St John of Jerusalem.

Reading Abbey School - opened first at Cliff House and transferred later to Devonshire Lodge.

Reading Central - located at “Inniscara”Reading East - located in the Church Hall at St Lukes Further temporary buildings were erected after a public appeal.

Reading University College - located at “Sutherlands” After demobilisation the hospital was re-opened for the treatment of wounded pensioners.

Reading West - located at “Struan House” for which a rent was paid. This was the last auxiliary hospital to close after the war.

Speen - located at Benham Valance

Wargrave - located at “Woodclyffe” with an annexe known as “Gladdy House”

West Woodhay - located at West Woodhay House. - intially it was afiliated with Albion House at Donnington but later set up its links direct with Reading.

Wokingham - located at “Church House” - lent by the Parish of All Saints

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purley

Military Hospitals in Reading Berkshire

The previous list noted hospitals run by various private persons and the Red Cross etc The following were run wholly or partly by the RAMC

Military hospitals were associated with a military command centre and as well as Reading there were such centres in Aldershot, Oxford, Taplow and Tidworth to which Berkshire auxillary hospitals reported. Taplow was a Canadian hospital.

The governors of the Royal Berkshire Hospital in Reading offered 50 beds to the War Office but stipulated they must be serious cases. The decided to fly both the Union Jack and the Red Cross Flag from the hospital and spent between £500 and £600 to provide extra beds and temporary accomodation. On Sunday 4th Oct 1914 they were officially put on standby by the Commander of the Southern General Hospital at Oxford to be ready to receive 40 cases.

By the end of 1915 an extensive network of hospitals had been established and in the Reading Mercury of 1/1/16 there is an account of the Christmas festivities for the wounded soldiers at the several Reading Hospitals. They were:-

READING No 1 WAR HOSPITAL, Reading Road

WILSON HOSPITAL, Wilson School

BATTLE HOSPITAL

No 5 WAR HOSPITAL Central School

REDLANDS WAR HOSPITAL

ST LUKES REDLAND HOSPITAL

STRUAN HOUSE VAD HOSPITAL

ROYAL BERKS HOSPITAL

It is interesting to note that the paper made a distinction between the Reading No 1 War Hospital and Battle Hospital, whereas most other publications treated them as one and the same. Exactly the same distinction was made at the end of 1916 when details of the staff was given and there are completely different reports for ‘no 1’ and ‘Battle’ In January 1916 Lt Col EA Hanley RAMC who was officer commanding the Reading War Hospital made an appeal in the local paper. He thanked all those who had offered hospitality to wounded soldiers in their own homes but begged them not to provide ‘intoxicating drink’ as this tempted the men to stay out after curfew and it impeded their recovery. [RM 1/1/16]

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Gary Samson

Another late arrival to this thread! I have a casualty who spent two weeks being treated (possibly convalescing) for a GSW at the Red Cross hospital at Norton, Gloucestershire in May 1915. Does anyone have any further information on this facility? Would it have been a temporary hospital established in, say, a large house in the area?

Gary

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HERITAGE PLUS

Gary

I think that your man was possibly at Chipping Norton War Hospital. Chipping Norton is now in Oxfordshire about 5-6 miles over the Gloucestershire border it has at various times due to boundary changes been in Oxfordshire and Gloucestershire.

This will give you some background:

http://www.chippingnorton.net/Features/hospital.htm

http://www.webdoc.co.uk/archives/small.htm

Archives are available see:

http://www.webdoc.co.uk/archives/whatsin.htm#Chipping Norton War Memorial Hospital

Dave

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