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Lancashire Fusilier

WW1 Military Medal 6 medal grouping - photographs and info.

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Lancashire Fusilier

I am pleased to share a 6 medal WW1 Military Medal grouping from my Collection.

The Court Mounted grouping was awarded to Sergeant Gilbert Hancock of the King's Royal Rifle Corps, later of the Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry and the Indian Army.

Cpl. G. Hancock's Military Medal awarded for Bravery in the Field was Gazetted on 11 February 1919.

10414 ( King's Royal Rifle Corps ) Gilbert Hancock lived in Newington at the time of his Military Medal award.

6837570 Sergeant Gilbert Hancock ( Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry ).

The grouping shown left to right are :-

The Military Medal

Instituted by King George V on 25th March, 1916. The original Royal Warrant states " We are desirous of signifying Our appreciation of acts of gallantry and devotion to duty performed by non-commissioned officers and men of Our Army in the Field "

The 36 mm diameter silver medal ( first type ) has on the obverse a bareheaded bust of KGV in Field Marshal's uniform facing left surrounded by the legend GEORGIUS V BRITT : OMN : REX ET IND : IMP : and on the reverse, the words " FOR BRAVERY IN THE FIELD " encircled by a wreath surmounted by the Royal Cipher and a Crown.

The medal ribbon is dark blue, 1.1/4 inches wide, with 3 white and 2 crimson stripes, each of 1/8 inch wide, down the centre.

The medal has an ornate scroll bar suspender.

Initially, recipients were not entitled to us the letters M.M. after their name, however, Army Order No.13 of January 1918 authorised all servicemen who had received the Military Medal to use the letters M.M. after their names.

During WW1 and covering the period from August 1914 to May 1920, 115,577 Military Crosses were awarded for Services in the Field.

The Military Medal Royal Warrant required the names of the recipients to be published in the London Gazette, and from September 1917, the recipient's home town was added to the Gazette details, but this practice ceased soon after the end of WW1. Towards the end of WW1. the theatre in which the medal was gained was sometimes added to the Gazette details.

The medal rim is impressed with the name rank, unit and regimental number of the recipient.

1914 Star with Clasp.

Authorised in April 1917, this bronze star bearing the date ' Aug - 1914 ' rewarded the original British Expeditionary Force ( BEF ) and their immediate reinforcements who crossed into Belgium and France in the earliest days of the war. Also known as the ' Mons Star ', it was awarded to those who served in the opening campaigns on the Western Front, including the ' Retreat to Mons ' in August 1914 and the fighting around Ypres.

The reverse of the star is plain and flat and bears the recipient's name and other details.

Approximately 378,000 stars were awarded for service between 4th August 1914 and midnight on 22nd November 1914.

The only Clasp awarded with the 1914 Star was the 5th Aug. - 22nd Nov. 1914. Clasp which was granted only to those soldiers who ' came under close fire of the enemy '.

The purpose of the Clasp, was to distinguish those who had been in action as opposed to those who served behind the lines.

The Clasp, which had to be claimed, was not sanctioned until 1919, by which time many of those entitled to the Clasp had been killed, and the Clasp was never claimed.

The Clasp is always stitched directly to the Star's ribbon

The British War Medal.

This 36 mm diameter silver medal was the standard medal for 1914-1918 with some 6,500,000 being awarded.

The obverse shows the uncrowned effigy of King George V, and on the reverse a symbolic design of a naked warrior on horseback.

The recipients name and other details are impressed on the rim of the medal.

The British War Medal also came in bronze for award to non-combatants, with some 110,000 being awarded.

The Victory Medal

This bronze, gilt-washed medal with its rainbow-coloured ribbon was awarded to some 5,725,000 recipients who served in any of the services between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918. ( including those who served in the 1919 post-war intervention in the Russian Civil War ).

It was never awarded alone and was often issued with the British War Medal to those who did not qualify for either of the earlier bronze Stars.

The obverse shows a depiction of a ' Winged Victory ' and the reverse contains the inscription ' The Great War for Civilisation 1914-1919 ' within an oak wreath.

For those Victory Medals awarded by the South African Government the inscription is in both English and Afrikaans.

The recipients name and other details are impressed on the rim of the medal.

India General Service Medal ( 1908-1935 ) 2nd Issue with the Waziristan 1921-24 Clasp

The obverse of this 1.42 inch diameter silver medal, 2nd Issue, shows a crowned bust of King George V in robes, and the legend " GEORGIVS V KAISAR-I-HIND, this 2nd issue started from 1911 and was designed by Richard Garbe.

The reverse has a picture of the fort at Jamrud, which commands the Khyber Pass eleven miles from Peshawur. Between the " V " formed by a branch of a oak and another of laurel is a tablet on which is the word " INDIA ".

The 1.25 inch wide ribbon is Green with a 0.6 inch wide dark blue stripe down the centre.

The medal has an ornate floral suspender.

The recipients name and other details are impressed on the rim of the medal.

The Waziristan 1921-24 Clasp

Army Order No. 177 of 1926 authorised the issue of this Clasp to all who served between 21st December, 1921 and 31st March, 1924 in North and South Waziristan, Bannu, the Dera Ismail Khan Civil Districts and the part of the Mianwali District which lies west of the River Indus, also the military posts of Mari Indus and Darya Khan east of the river Indus.

Those awarded the Clasp included servicemen from Cavalry, Artillery, Armoured Car Coys, Sappers and Miners, and Infantry Regiments and the RAF.

Long Service and Good Conduct Medal ( King George V issue - 1911 - 1920 )

The Long Service and Good Conduct Medal was instituted in 1830.

The medal is made of silver and is 36 mm in diameter.

The KGV 1911-20 issue obverse depicts a bareheaded bust of KGV in Field Marshal's uniform facing left surrounded by the legend GEORGIUS V BRITT : OMN : REX ET IND : IMP :

The medal reverse bears in inscription FOR LONG SERVICE AND GOOD CONDUCT

The suspender is an ornate scroll suspender. After 1920 this suspender was changed to a non-swivelling suspender.

Prior to 1916 the medal ribbon was a plain dark crimson, and in 1917 to clearly distinguish it from the Victoria Cross ribbon, a 3 mm wide white stripe was added to each edge of the 32 mm wide ribbon.

The medal was originally awarded to infantry NCOs and men who had completed 24 years of good conduct, and in 1870, this qualifying period was reduced to 18 years for both infantry and cavalry.

The recipients name and or details are engraved or impressed around the medal rim.

Sadly and unfortunately, many Military Medals have long since become separated from the other medals/awards originally issued to the recipient, and Military Medals are often seen offered for sale alone and without the recipients other medals/awards.

Should any member have any information on Sgt. Gilbert Hancock, his service history or any photographs of him, I would be delighted to see them.

LF

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Lancashire Fusilier

2

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Lancashire Fusilier

I have the Sgt. Gilbert Hancock's Medal Index Card, and the London Gazette for the award of his Military Medal.

His Reg. No. with the King's Royal Rifle Corps was 10414, and with the Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry Reg. No. 6837570.

I know that he served both in Flanders and France from 13 August, 1914.

Any other information or photographs would be greatly appreciated.

LF

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David B

Lovely group LF. I still have a bit of plain red ribbon that was on my g/f's original LSGC. He used to say that it made it look like a VC so was eventually

changed to what you have there.

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Lancashire Fusilier

Lovely group LF. I still have a bit of plain red ribbon that was on my g/f's original LSGC. He used to say that it made it look like a VC so was eventually changed to what you have there.

David,

Many thanks, and it is so nice to have your g/f's medal ribbon, as you say, in 1917 to avoid any confusion with the ribbon on the V.C., white stripes were deliberately added to the LSGC ribbon.

Regards,

LF

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Lancashire Fusilier

For those interested in the bayonets, both are Pattern 1907 Sword Bayonets with a Hooked Quillion.

The bayonet on the left has a Pommel with an issue mark to the King's Shropshire Light Infantry, and also has the rare Mk.I scabbard with the internal metal chape, and the bayonet on the right has a Pommel with an issue mark to the Seaforth Highlanders.

LF

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Hywyn

Re your problem on the other (closed) thread about altering the title.

Select edit in your opening post.

Scroll to bottom of that post and select 'Use Full Editor'

I'm posting this here rather than by PM for your info & anyone else who may have similar problem.

Hywyn

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Lancashire Fusilier

Re your problem on the other (closed) thread about altering the title.

Select edit in your opening post.

Scroll to bottom of that post and select 'Use Full Editor'

I'm posting this here rather than by PM for your info & anyone else who may have similar problem.

Hywyn

Hywyn,

Many thanks for that useful information.

Regards,

LF

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Steven Broomfield

Lovely set, LF: very nice indeed.

Out of interest, you say he was in Indian Army, but is that certain? Just out of interest.

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Lancashire Fusilier

Out of interest, you say he was in Indian Army, but is that certain? Just out of interest.

Steven,

Many thanks.

Part of the inscription on the rim of his Army LSGC medal is ' S.-Sjt. Instr., I.U.L. Attd. A.F.I. ' and I should have stated that.

I have ' I.U.L. ' - as ' Indian Un-attached List ' and ' A.F.I. ' - as ' Auxillary Forces, India '.

I am looking for his Army Service Record which should confirm this.

What do you make of the LSGC inscription ?

His Military Medal is inscribed to the 1st Battalion, King's Royal Rifle Corps, as is his British War Medal and Victory Medal.

His India General Service Medal is inscribed to the Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry.

Regards,

LF

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Philip Wilson

The 1914 Star was issued with a bar and not a clasp - see extract from Ribbons and Medals of the Great War by Commander Taprell Dorling, DSO, RN, published in 1920. This little book also covers the Report of the Committee appointed to consider the question of medals for the Great War,in some considerable detail.

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The first edition of Ribbons and Medals was published in 1916 and was reprinted in July 1918 with the edition of Part 11 covering Foreign Orders and Medals conferred upon British service personnel. A further revision of Part 11 was produced in January 1919 and can be found in bound copies of Ribbons and Medals published in 1920. These individual booklets are well worth looking out for.

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Lancashire Fusilier

The 1914 Star was issued with a bar and not a clasp - see extract from Ribbons and Medals of the Great War by Commander Taprell Dorling, DSO, RN, published in 1920. This little book also covers the Report of the Committee appointed to consider the question of medals for the Great War,in some considerable detail.

The first edition of Ribbons and Medals was published in 1916 and was reprinted in July 1918 with the edition of Part 11 covering Foreign Orders and Medals conferred upon British service personnel. A further revision of Part 11 was produced in January 1919 and can be found in bound copies of Ribbons and Medals published in 1920. These individual booklets are well worth looking out for.

Philip,

Many thanks for the follow up and book information.

I checked with several current medal reference books, and they are referring to the 1914 ' Clasp ' not ' Bar '.

I have an excellent book by Major L.L. Gordon " British Battles and Medals " ( 1979 Edition ) in which, he interestingly refers to the 1914 Star ' Bar ' as the ' Mons Bar ' ?

I shall try and find a copy of the original Royal Warrant and see what that says ?

Regards,

LF

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Lancashire Fusilier

Perhaps there is an ' Official ' definition for both a ' Bar ' and a ' Clasp '.

The English Dictionary defines a ' Bar ' as -

" An insignia added to a military decoration indicating that it has been awarded for the second time ".

and a ' Clasp ' as -

" A small metal bar attached to a military decoration indicating the action for which it was awarded ".

Based on the Dictionary definition, the 1914 Star would have a Clasp ?

Had the Military Medal been awarded for the second time, it would have a Bar ?

Any ideas or ' Official ' references ?

LF

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horatio2

From the Admiralty promulgation dated 17 Dec 1919:-

"His Majesty the King having been pleased to approve of the grant of a clasp to the Officers and men who have been awarded the "1914 Star" and who actually served under the fire of the enemy in France and Belgium ... The clasp will be in bronze and will bear the inscription "5th August - 22nd November 1914" ... In undressed uniform when ribands are worn, the grant of the clasp will be denoted by the wearing of a small silver rose in the centre of the riband."

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Old Owl

I think the area between a clasp and a bar is a very, very grey area!! and really of little consequence as it appears to me, that they are infact one and the same thing. Take for example "an M.M. with second award clasp" or "an M.M. with bar"--we all know to what each of these refer, or, "a QSA with 5 clasps" or "a five bar QSA".

I think we all have our own ideas on the above, and as such these should not be quoted as being right or wrong, because quite clearly they are neither!!

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Philip Wilson

Philip,

Many thanks for the follow up and book information.

I checked with several current medal reference books, and they are referring to the 1914 ' Clasp ' not ' Bar '.

I have an excellent book by Major L.L. Gordon " British Battles and Medals " ( 1979 Edition ) in which, he interestingly refers to the 1914 Star ' Bar ' as the ' Mons Bar ' ?

I shall try and find a copy of the original Royal Warrant and see what that says ?

Regards,

LF

Major Gordon like other authors on medals fell into the trap of calling clasps bars. Look at the Medal Rolls for the Queen's South Africa Medal or the India General Service Medal and they are called clasps - likewise for those that would have been issued for the British War Medal, to those in the Royal Navy.

I agree in various books and official documents on the subject of engagement bars attached to medals these are variously referred to as 'bars' or 'clasps.' Officers's and OR's service papers refer to medals and clasps issued.

The term bar has generally become accepted to describe the inscribed bar attached to a medal or that worn on the ribbon of a medal. For example 1914 Star and bar. Clearly decorations such as the Military Cross when awarded twice to the same recipient are referred to as MC and bar.

The Medal Year Book when describing individual British campaign medals correctly refers to bars as clasps. although others may not agree with their interpration on the 1914 Star with clasp. There will always be two schools of thought re bars or clasps.

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Lancashire Fusilier

As detailed in horatio2's post #14, giving the official Admiralty definition of the Clasp to the 1914 Star, the Army also designated the 1914 Star as having a Clasp, and not a Bar.

Here is the text of the Army Order ( AO 361 ) '1914 Star ' - Grant of Clasp.

1. His Majesty the King has been graciously pleased to approve the issue of a clasp to officers, warrant officers, non-commssioned officers and men who have actually been awarded the ' 1914 Star ' under Army Order 350 of 1917, and who actually served under fire of the enemy in France and Belgium between the 5th August, 1914, and midnight 22nd/23rd November, 1914.

2. The clasp will be in bronze and will bear the inscription : ' 5th Aug. - 22nd Nov. 1914 '.

3. In undress service uniform, when ribands are worn, the grant of the clasp will be denoted by the wearing of a small silver rose in the middle of the riband.

4. Officers and soldiers who were actually present on duty within range of the enemy's mobile artillery and were on the strength of, or attached to units and formations set forth in Appendix A between the above mentioned dates, will be eligible for the award.

5. An individual who served with a formation, otherwise than named in Appendix A, will only be granted the clasp on furnishing a certificate signed by an officer, warrant officer, or non-commissioned officer not below the rank of sergeant personally cognisant that the individual served on duty within the range of the enemy's mobile artillery during the period referred to in paragraph 1.

6. Two small silver roses will be issued with the clasp to each approved individual.

7. Officers commanding units and heads of departments will forward nominal rolls of troops now serving under their command entitled to the clasp, to the Secretary, War Office ( AG10 ), 27 Pilgrim Street, EC4. The rolls should be made out in duplicate in conformity with the specimen shown in Appendix B.

8. Individuals not now serving should apply on special forms ( which can be obtained on application to any head or branch post office in a town or to any post office in the country districts ), to the officer in charge of the record office of the corps in which they last served. If possible the certificate which referred to in pagragraph 5 ( and which will be found on the form ), should be first completed and signed as directed thereon. Officers in charge of records will forward all applications through the officer commanding the unit concerned, to the Secretary, War Office ( AG10 ), 27, Pligrim Street, EC4. Applications made otherwise than on the prescribed form will be ignored.

I am sure that irrespective of any ' official ' order or designation, the 1914 Star will still be referred to by some as the ' Mons Star ' and the 1914 Star Clasp as a Bar.

LF

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Lancashire Fusilier

It has been reported that a Committee was formed to consider the design and specification for the clasp to the 1914 Star.

Two designs submitted by the Royal Mint were considered, a 31mm x 5 mm sew-on bronze bar, with 4 small holes, 2 in each corner for sewing to the Star's ribbon. The other design considered, was a ' slider bar ' using the same design as on the DCM and MM Bars.

Apparently, the deciding factor was cost, with the sew-on version adopted as being considerably cheaper to produce.

350,000 clasps to the 1914 Star were produced by the Royal Mint.

LF

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Philip Wilson

Thank you for finding the original Army Order re the 1914 Star and clasp

David Ascoli in his book 'The Mons Star' published in 1982 refers to the clasp as a bar - as do other authors.

David implies in his book that fewer than 230,000 bars (clasps) were actually issued to those serving within the BEF during the qualifying period. The book is well worth reading likewise Kate Caffrey's 'Farewell Leicester Square - The Old Contemptibles'.

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Lancashire Fusilier

Thank you for finding the original Army Order re the 1914 Star and clasp

David Ascoli in his book 'The Mons Star' published in 1982 refers to the clasp as a bar - as do other authors.

David implies in his book that fewer than 230,000 bars (clasps) were actually issued to those serving within the BEF during the qualifying period. The book is well worth reading likewise Kate Caffrey's 'Farewell Leicester Square - The Old Contemptibles'.

Philip,

Many thanks for the book referrals.

With the 1914 Star clasp not being approved until 16th October, 1919, many of those entitled to the clasp, based on their service back in August/November 1914, had been killed/died, or had since been demobilised, and perhaps many claims for those clasps were never processed or submitted, hence the figure of fewer than 230,000 clasps being issued.

Regards,

LF

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Lancashire Fusilier

Cpl. G. Hancock's Military Medal card, and his London Gazette entry for schedule No. 204130 published 11 February, 1919 shows he received his Military Medal for Bravery in the Field during the Battle of Amiens, 8th August to 3rd September 1918.

Does any member have the War Diaries for the Kings Royal Rifle Corps covering the Battle of Amiens during this period of 8 Aug - 3 September, 1918 ? I am hoping to find out the details of Cpl. G. Hancock's Military Medal award ?

LF

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Paul Nixon

Looking at regimental numbers for the KRRC, Gilbert Hancock joined the regiment at the beginning of January 1912 and was one of around 90 men to join the KRRC that month. Nice group, thanks for sharing.

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Lancashire Fusilier

Looking at regimental numbers for the KRRC, Gilbert Hancock joined the regiment at the beginning of January 1912 and was one of around 90 men to join the KRRC that month. Nice group, thanks for sharing.

Paul,

Many thanks for the information on his enlistment, and I am pleased to liked the medal grouping.

Regards,

LF

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ghchurcher

Although being as guilty as the next collector in lazily referring to campaign medal battle or service "clasps" as 'bars' on a day to day basis I have never been in any doubt that officially the correct terminology is indeed "clasps" for campaign medals and that 'bars' refer exclusively to second (and subsequent multiple) awards of decorations (ie galantry and orders) and awards (ie MSMs LS&GC etc etc).

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nthornton1979

Nice group. Was this up with a major auction house about months ago?

My friend (a Hancock) collects to his surname and I remember seeing a group (similar to this one) in a catalogue.

Neil

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