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Bosquoy

10th Royal Hussars - Appropriate home wanted for photograph album

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Bosquoy

I have inherited an album of photographs of the 10th Royal Hussars from the late 19th Century which I pledged to find a good home for. Anyone know who acts as a "Keeper of the Knowledge" for the regiment? If so, I'd be glad to hear from them. Or if anyone could suggest where it might go to be safeguarded for future generations. I don't know where would be appropriate - any suggestions welcome (but not Ebay!)

My Grandfather was in the 10th Hussars and served in India and the Boer War: he died in August 1914 and the album was his (we think). I have his medals, Death Penny and other personal bits & bobs which won't leave the family, but the album is of wider interest. It's got some cracking shots - too big for my wee scanner but I've taken a snap of a few of them.

Any suggestions?

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keithmroberts

The Regimental Museum would seem to be a good possibility.

http://www.armymuseums.org.uk/amot-search/default.asp?Category=Amot&Service=Museum-Display&reference=0000000057

I fthis apeals to you I suggest asking them to confirm their acquisitions policy. Some museums have policies that allow disposal of "surplus" items.

Keith

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Steven Broomfield

A kind offer. I am Hon Archivist for HorsePower, the museum of the King's Royal Hussars in Winchester; this covers mostly The 10th Royal Hussars (PWO), The 11th Hussars (PAO) and The Royal Hussars (PWO) (the amalgamation of the Tenth and the Eleventh prior to another amalgamation with The 14th/20th King's Hussars to create the KRH). We would love these photos in the archives.

I can be contacted through the Contact link on this website: http://www.horsepowermuseum.co.uk/ (this might also act as a sign of good faith that I'm not trying to get my hands on something valuable by underhand means).

Out of interest, what was your grandfather's name? He will, at the very least, appear in the Roll of Honour in the regimental history by Colonel Whitmore.

The Regimental Museum would seem to be a good possibility.

http://www.armymuseu...ence=0000000057

I fthis apeals to you I suggest asking them to confirm their acquisitions policy. Some museums have policies that allow disposal of "surplus" items.

Keith

I don't think this will be "surplus" :thumbsup:

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spconnolly007

What a fantastic offer. If you get your hands on it Broomers make sure you scan everything for the rest of us to see :thumbsup:

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bill24chev

I like the photo of the soldier and horse lying down with revolver drawn (the soldier not the Horse). For me it shows the relationship and trust between cavalry man and his mount. not WW1 but I can imagine similer situations in India,Palestine or Mesopotamia during WW1

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Bosquoy

Thanks to all who have replied - and so quickly!

Alas I think my grandfather isn't in Col. Whitmore's Roll of Honour. At least not as far as I have been able to ascertain without getting my hands on a copy! It was a rather tragic story.

He was Major Arthur Hughes-Onslow, a well known horseman and celebrated amateur jockey - three times winner of the Military Gold Cup etc etc. But he'd had a pretty poor time of it in the Boer War and couldn't face the prospect of leading his horses (and troops) into battle again. My mother (Arthur's granddaughter) who is now 92 says he shot himself on the ship taking them over the channel to fight. I can pick him out in a number of the pictures in the album - he's still something of a hero to this grandson!

Thanks to all for replying so quickly - I can't think of a better home for the book than the Horsepower Museum. I'll get in touch through your website as you suggest. I have some other stuff - odd notes and diagrams of campaigns in the Boer war - which might also interest you.

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CGM

Here is his entry in the Commonwealth War Graves Commission Debt of Honour:

HUGHES-ONSLOW, ARTHUR

Rank: Major

Date of Death: 17/08/1914

Age: 51

Regiment/Service: 10th (Prince of Wales's Own Royal) Hussars (C.O. Remounts)

Grave Reference: Div. 64. VI. B. 1.

Cemetery: STE. MARIE CEMETERY, LE HAVRE

Additional Information: Husband of Mrs. Arthur Hughes-Onslow, of Linda Vista, Abergavenny, Mon.

Native of Alton Albany, Girvan, Ayrshire.

Served in the Sudan and South African campaigns.

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Steven Broomfield

Great: I will look through the archives next time I'm in (probably next Saturday; I'm at paid work today, chizz ...) as there is bound to be information about him. We have a pretty complete set of Regimental Gazettes, for example. I suspect he won't be in Whitmore (I'll check tonight as I have a copy at home) if he died on extra-regimental employment.

He would also, I'd be pretty sure, be mentioned in Liddell's history of the Tenth up to 1898 (of which I don't currently have a copy at home).

Once again, a very generous offer and I will respond via our museum website.

If only Mrs Broomfield had shown any excitement or enthusiasm when I told her about this last night ...

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Bosquoy

If only Mrs Broomfield had shown any excitement or enthusiasm when I told her about this last night ...

There was a different reaction in this household - it's the prospect of getting that "dusty old tome" out of the sitting room at last.

According to my mother (almost as old but not as dusty) Arthur shot himself on the troopship taking them over to France but any confirmation - in fact any information - would be much appreciated. His son, who was serving on HMS St Vincent out of Scapa Flow, only heard of the manner of his death after the war when he was hit with a tax bill for death duties. When he questioned H.M.G. why he should be taxed when his father had died in action, he was told that because Arthur shot himself, the heir was liable for death duties. We have found a letter from the War Office to his widow which was sent with his 1914 Star, War & Victory medals which was dated January 1921, and wondered whether this was a typical delay in posthumous medals arriving or whether it suggests the family campaigned for the decorations?

His life (outwith the army) was fairly well documented but we know less about his military career so any new info would be greatly welcomed.

CGM: Thanks for the War Graves Commission info.

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Bosquoy

There was a different reaction in this household - it's the prospect of getting that "dusty old tome" out of the sitting room at last.

Eeek! The "dusty old tome" comment was my wife's - not mine!

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rclpillinger

I have read the discussion with great interest. My Grandfather, Major Roland Pillinger joined the Tenth in 1879 and served until 1913. He took many photographs and I have inheritted several albums. I have published them all on the web at majorpillinger.com and I think you might find the 400 or so pictures from the Boer War of interest. If you find your Granfather in any of these I would be delighted to know. They are all numbered if you could advise me which pics. Major Hughes-Onslow appears in I can have them captioned.

I am hoping to get to the Museum soon to picture the last album that my Father gave to Winchester some years ago, that refers to the tour of India 1902-10.

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alanlw

Here is his entry in the Commonwealth War Graves Commission Debt of Honour:

HUGHES-ONSLOW, ARTHUR

Rank: Major

Date of Death: 17/08/1914

Age: 51

Regiment/Service: 10th (Prince of Wales's Own Royal) Hussars (C.O. Remounts)

Grave Reference: Div. 64. VI. B. 1.

Cemetery: STE. MARIE CEMETERY, LE HAVRE

Additional Information: Husband of Mrs. Arthur Hughes-Onslow, of Linda Vista, Abergavenny, Mon.

Native of Alton Albany, Girvan, Ayrshire.

Served in the Sudan and South African campaigns.

The XRH didn't arrive on the continent until October 1914 (7th, I think) as they had first to travel back from South Africa, so Major Hughes-Onslow must have with another regiment at the time.

Alan.

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alanlw

Thanks to all who have replied - and so quickly!

Alas I think my grandfather isn't in Col. Whitmore's Roll of Honour. At least not as far as I have been able to ascertain without getting my hands on a copy! It was a rather tragic story.

He was Major Arthur Hughes-Onslow, a well known horseman and celebrated amateur jockey - three times winner of the Military Gold Cup etc etc. But he'd had a pretty poor time of it in the Boer War and couldn't face the prospect of leading his horses (and troops) into battle again. My mother (Arthur's granddaughter) who is now 92 says he shot himself on the ship taking them over the channel to fight. I can pick him out in a number of the pictures in the album - he's still something of a hero to this grandson!

Thanks to all for replying so quickly - I can't think of a better home for the book than the Horsepower Museum. I'll get in touch through your website as you suggest. I have some other stuff - odd notes and diagrams of campaigns in the Boer war - which might also interest you.

I have just found a digital copy of the 1900 Army List entry for the XRH. Major Hughes-Onslow appears in it twice. Can email you the PDF if you PM me your email address.

Alan

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Rick T

My first post on this site but I was also reading this thread with interest.

If it is off any interest, I haven't located any references to Arthur Hughes-Onslow's sad demise or the circumstances surrounding it, however, I have located a fantastic write up in the Leeds Mercury, dated Thursday, June 4th 1891 (page 5), reporting on the marriage of Capt Arthur Hughes-Onslow to Miss Kathleen Whitehead (grand daughter of the late right honourable Matthew Talbot Baines) at Escrick, just outside York. Capt Huges-Onslow was stationed at York with the 10th Hussars.

There is a detailed account of the wedding, wedding dress and a long list of relatives and almost a military "who's who" of those invited to the wedding. The Groomsman was Captain the Hon. Julian Byng (the following article mentions Col. the Hon. Henry Byng arriving at Balmoral as Equerry-in-Waiting to Queen Victoria and dining with the Queen and Earl Cardogan).

Perhaps the write up was so detailed due to Sir Edward Baines, younger brother to Matthew Talbot Baines, being the proprietor of the Leeds Mercury!

I have a copy of the page in pdf format if interested (let me have your email) or you can source from the British Newspaper Archives.

Cheers, Rick

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Steven Broomfield

Public acknowledgement that the album arrived safely today (despite the courier delivering it to an address in a different road!), together with two CDs scanned from the album. I am taking them all into the Museum tomorrow. Sadly the pictures aren't GW-relevant, but I'm sure everyone will forgive me for sharing this splendid shot of an officer of the 10th Royal Hussars (Prince of Wales's Own) in the 1880's.

Brilliant - I love my (unpaid) job.

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museumtom

I have some letters from an Irish officer in the XRH who was killed in 1917. If you want a look up on a name etc I am happy to do so.

Cheers.

Tom.

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alanlw

The Armstrong Collection at the University of Limerick is now open to the public and features hundreds, if not thousands, of letters written by Pat (W.M.A.) Armstrong to his mother and others from his days at school, through joining the XRH in India, South Africa and the Cavalry School in Netheravon. They then continue in WWI from his time as an ADC to back in active service in Gallipoli and the Western Front. A fascinating read. Many photos too. He was killed by a sniper in 1917. Lots of photos too.

Alan

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Steven Broomfield

Thanks Alan - noted.

Is it on-line (possibly forlorn hope)?

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alanlw

Not yet, Steven, though there were vague plans. I have a few copies of parts letters relevant to the guy I am researching (Brocklehurst), plus some transcriptions and an extract from the catalogue.

Alan

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museumtom

There is a talk on the Armstrongs (William (Pat) Armstrong was in the 10th Hussars when he was killed at Arras) of Moyaliffe in the Thurles Library on 20th August at 7,30 pm. The talk is by Anna Maria Hajba, Archivist of the University of Limerick.

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Andy Wade

Slight confusion over the death place, but I think this is definitely him:

England & Wales, National Probate Calendar (Index of Wills and Administrations), 1858-1966

Name: Arthur Hughes Onslow

Probate Date: 10 Oct 1914

Death Date: 17 Aug 1914

Death Place: Ayrshire, Scotland

Registry: London, England

Onslow

Major Arthur Hughes of Branston Oakham and of Alton Albany County AYR died 17 August 1914 on board SS City of Edinburgh in Havre Roads France.

Confirmation of Anne Kathleen Whitehead or Hughes Onslow widow Denzil Hughes Onslow and David William Shaw solicitor. Sealed LONDON 10th October.

England & Wales, National Probate Calendar (Index of Wills and Administrations), 1858-1966 about Arthur Hughes Onslow

Name: Arthur Hughes Onslow

Probate Date: 14 Oct 1927

Death Date: 17 Aug 1914

Death Place: Rutlandshire, England

Registry: London, England

Onslow

Arthur Hughes of The Cedars Braunston Oakham Rutlandshire and of Alton Albany Ayrshire NB died 17 August 1914 on board the SS City of Edinburgh in Havre Roads France

Probate LONDON 14 October to Anne Kathleen Hughes Onslow widow. Effects £1300. Former Grant (S.Confirmation) Sealed LONDON 10 October 1914.

UK, Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919 about Arthur Hughes-onslow

Name: Arthur Hughes-onslow

Death Date: 17 Aug 1914

Rank: Major

Regiment: Household Cavalry and Cavalry of the Line (incl. Yeomanry and Imperial Camel Corps)

Battalion: 10th (Prince of Waless Own Royal) Hussars

Type of Casualty: Died

Comments: R Of

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alanlw

Slight confusion over the death place, but I think this is definitely him:

England & Wales, National Probate Calendar (Index of Wills and Administrations), 1858-1966

Name: Arthur Hughes Onslow

Probate Date: 10 Oct 1914

Death Date: 17 Aug 1914

Death Place: Ayrshire, Scotland

Registry: London, England

Onslow

Major Arthur Hughes of Branston Oakham and of Alton Albany County AYR died 17 August 1914 on board SS City of Edinburgh in Havre Roads France.

Confirmation of Anne Kathleen Whitehead or Hughes Onslow widow Denzil Hughes Onslow and David William Shaw solicitor. Sealed LONDON 10th October.

England & Wales, National Probate Calendar (Index of Wills and Administrations), 1858-1966 about Arthur Hughes Onslow

Name: Arthur Hughes Onslow

Probate Date: 14 Oct 1927

Death Date: 17 Aug 1914

Death Place: Rutlandshire, England

Registry: London, England

Onslow

Arthur Hughes of The Cedars Braunston Oakham Rutlandshire and of Alton Albany Ayrshire NB died 17 August 1914 on board the SS City of Edinburgh in Havre Roads France

Probate LONDON 14 October to Anne Kathleen Hughes Onslow widow. Effects £1300. Former Grant (S.Confirmation) Sealed LONDON 10 October 1914.

UK, Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919 about Arthur Hughes-onslow

Name: Arthur Hughes-onslow

Death Date: 17 Aug 1914

Rank: Major

Regiment: Household Cavalry and Cavalry of the Line (incl. Yeomanry and Imperial Camel Corps)

Battalion: 10th (Prince of Waless Own Royal) Hussars

Type of Casualty: Died

Comments: R Of

A new picture of Hughes Onslow has just appeared on the revamped Major Pillinger website

http://majorpillinge...m/about/about3/

Alan

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alanlw

There is a talk on the Armstrongs (William (Pat) Armstrong was in the 10th Hussars when he was killed at Arras) of Moyaliffe in the Thurles Library on 20th August at 7,30 pm. The talk is by Anna Maria Hajba, Archivist of the University of Limerick.

Tom,

Alas it's a bit far to go from England for a talk.

Say hallo to Anna-Maria from me - she was very helpful when we visited the archive. Show her the letters you have - she will be very interested.

Alan

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NedRutland

Aha! I now see there is a Rutland connection.

In the book "Rutland and the Great War" there is an obituary and a photo; the biography states that "on the 17th August, 1914, while on board ship crossing from England to France, he suddenly succumbed to sickness, and his body was conveyed to Harve <sic>"

I will happily forward scans of the book if anyone wishes to PM me

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nigelcave

... 'he suddenly succumbed to sickness': that's one way of putting it! Poor man; poor family.

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