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grantowi

Capt Arthur Kirby's VC for sale

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grantowi

Not sure if this has been posted - http://uk.news.yahoo...at-auction.html

The Victoria Cross awarded to a brave First World War hero who continued to battle on despite having his foot blown off is expected to fetch up to £180,000 at auction.

Captain Kilby was merited for his "most conspicuous bravery". Captain Arthur Forbes Gordon Kilby was posthumously honoured with Britain's highest gallantry award after he fought on during the 1915 Battle of Loos- despite suffering the horrific injury.

Grant

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Lancashire Fusilier

Grant,

What these very brave men actually did, never ceases to amaze me. This is the 2nd VC coming up for sale, and they often go, rightly so, to holder's Regimental Museum.

Regards,

LF

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grantowi

LF,

If you have a look at the link, there is also the 1st VC awarded to a Private S F Godley of the Royal Fusiliers up for grabs

As you say. brave men

Grant

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Roy Evans

Captain A.F.G. Kilby VC,

2nd Battalion South Staffordshire Regiment

The son of Sandford and Alice Kilby of 'East Hayes', Pittville Circus Road, Cheltenham, Arthur Forbes Gordon Kilby was born on 3rd February 1885.

Educated at Bilton Grange, Rugby and Winchester College, Arthur Kilby graduated from the Royal Military College at Sandhurst in 1905 with a commission into South Staffordshire Regiment.

An talented linguist, fluent in both German and Hungarian, Arthur was promoted to Captain on 1st April 1910, at the age of 25, and was posted to the 2nd Battalion South Staffordshire Regiment on 13th August 1914.

Captain Kilby was killed in action on 25th September 1915 whilst leading his company against enemy positions near Cuinchy, on the Le Bassee Canal and was awarded a posthumous Victoria Cross on 30th March 1916.

The citation, published in the London Gazette, read "For most conspicuous gallantry. Captain Kilby was specially selected, at his own request, and on account of the gallantry which he had previously displayed on many occasions, to attack with his Company a strong enemy redoubt.

"The Company charged along the narrow towpath, headed by Captain Kilby, who, though wounded at the outset, continued to lead his men right up to the enemy wire under a devastating machine gun fire and a shower of bombs. Here he was shot down, but, although his foot had been blown off, he continued to cheer his men and to use a rifle. Captain Kilby has been missing since the date of the performance of this great act of valour, and his death has now been presumed.”

His heroism was acknowledged by the German defenders who erected a memorial cross at the location of his death. Captain Kilby’s body was eventually found on 19th February 1929 and interred at Arras Road Cemetery, Roclincourt, Plot III, Row N, Grave 27.

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Chris_Baker

... This is the 2nd VC coming up for sale, and they often go, rightly so, to holder's Regimental Museum.

But more often in recent times they go to the private ownership of Lord Ashcroft.

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Seadog

Who as we all know has funded the VC Gallery in the Imperial War Museum where the medals from his collection are on display so that the public can view them. Something for which Lord Ashcroft deserves congratulations.

More:

http://www.victoriac...uk/vvashcro.htm

Regards

Norman

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Lancashire Fusilier

Spink's Hammer Prices ( excluding their commissions ) for the 2 VCs were 230,000 pounds and 200,000 pounds.

LF

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Sandie Hayes

_61687232_godleymedalstogowithpgs.jpg

Private Sydney Godley's medals, including his V.C., were sold for £276,000 today.

Would someone be kind enough to explain the 2 silver medals on the right, please.

Also I'd like to know the significance of the decoration on the Victory Medal and why is there a 'clasp' on the Star but no 'rose'?

Many thanks,

Sandie

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Seadog

Sandie the medals are

Coronation 1937

Coronation 1953

Click on the link in my post No.5 for much more info.

Norman

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Sandie Hayes

Thank you Norman, I thought one looked like our Queen!

Thank you for the link. I was hoping The Fusiliers Museum would be successful in buying Private Godley's medals but the price was too high. Let's hope Lord Ashcroft was the purchaser.

Thanks again,

Sandie

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Sandie Hayes

Private Sidney Godley 'set the standard for the British Tommy' when he took a machine gun from a severely wounded officer and despite shrapnel wounds and a bullet lodged in his skull continued to hold his position alone for two hours against heavy German assault.

When he was ordered to withdraw, Private Godley, then 25, maintained a covering fire until the entire battalion was evacuated, but was eventually overpowered by the enemy and taken as a prisoner of war.

His brave actions defending the Nimy Bridge at Mons on the August 23, 1914 during the first infantry attack of the war earned the Royal Fusiliers soldier the highest decoration in the British Army.

When word got back to King George V about his astonishing bravery, he was recommended the award although army chiefs first thought it would be a posthumous award - until word got back to Britain that Pvt Godley had miraculously survived after being operated on at a German field hospital.

The recommendation by Lieutenant FWA Steele, Royal Fusiliers, states: ‘In the defence of a railway bridge near Nimy, 23rd August 1914, Private Godley of ‘B’ Company showed particular heroism in his management of the machine guns.

‘His Commanding Officer having been severely wounded and each machine gunner in turn shot, Private Godley was called to the firing line on the bridge and under heavy fire he had to remove three dead bodies and proceed to an advanced machine gun position under a sustained enemy fire.

‘He carried on defending the position for two hours after he had received a severe head wound.’

The announcement of the award - given during the first infantry attack of the Great War - was published in the London Gazette on November 25, 1914.

It read: ‘For coolness and gallantry in fighting his machine gun under a hot fire for two hours after he had been wounded at Mons on 23rd August.’

Mr Pepys said: ‘The courage was extraordinary. It would have been very easy for him to sit and obey orders and when the order came to withdraw, to withdraw. He definitely stood up to the plate.’

Sidney Godley was released at the end of the war and moved back to his home in East End of London. He worked at the Tower of London as a volunteer for the rest of his life as a leading member in the Old Contemptibles Association - a group created to ensure the ordeal of the conflict was never forgotten. He died in 1957.

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HarryBettsMCDCM

Hi Sandie

Also I'd like to know the significance of the decoration on the Victory Medal and why is there a 'clasp' on the Star but no 'rose'?

The Emblem is the Oak Leaf Spray which represents one or more Mentions in Despatches, it was instituted post 1918 for wear on the Victory Medal Ribbon

The Rosette was only for wear on the ribbon bar NOT for wear on the Medal when worn, it is there to signify the award of the Clasp when undress uniform is being worn.

HB

The Jubilee and Coronation Medals are normally awarded to surviving VC /GC recipients as a token from the Monarch

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Sandie Hayes

Thank you for the explanations, I really appreciate your help.

Kind regards,

Sandie

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Chris_Baker

... during the first infantry attack of the war ...

It wasn't. The Germans and French had already been engaged in enormous actions, and the Belgian army had also been engaged. It was the first infantry advance against British forces.

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Seadog

As regards Private Godley and his VC according to the Daily Telegraph today here in the UK the buyer was not Lord Ashcroft so if this is correct to all intents and purposes this unique medal will disappear into someone’s collection and not be seen again which for what is a national treasure will be most unfortunate to say the least.

Norman

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loganshort

The Lord Ashcroft collection at the IWM is fantastic. The display of medals along with personal or contemporary artifacts and descriptions makes them more meaningful than simply rows of the same medals witha few names. I hope also that they will be on display for all to see.

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loganshort

Just seen your post Norman. How sad if they are going to be hidden from view instead of displayed properly with descriptions of their owner's herioc deeds.

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Seadog

I totally agree with your sentiments in fact in my view this is an important national artifact on a par with the various works of art that we have seen funds raised so they can remain in the country and be seen by everyone, frankly it is about time this applied to such unique medals.

Norman

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Sandie Hayes

It wasn't. The Germans and French had already been engaged in enormous actions, and the Belgian army had also been engaged. It was the first infantry advance against British forces.

I can't claim the story, Chris, it was published on the 'Daily Mail Online' yesterday.

Sandie

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War13Memorial

As I said in another post.

The first VC awarded in The Great War was to Lance Corporal Charles Alfred Jarvis, Royal Engineers, also on the 23rd August 1914.

Purchased at auction c1960, by Birmingham Museum where it lies in a storeroom not on display, shocking.

Billy

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Peter Bennett

I agree with the sentiments but it must be remembered that Private Godley's VC and other medals have never been on public display.

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loganshort

It is true that there are many, many important items connected with WW1 in private hands: decendants of the original owners or collectors taking good care of them but unfortunately not on public view. I certainly do not blame a family for keeping such items private;y.

One VC looks exactly like any other (I'm willing to accept any duplicates!), however, the circumstances of gaining the award make it special and individual. This is portrayed in the Ashcroft collection at the IWM. Godley's actions are one of the legends of WW1 and his medals would be exciting to see along with his photograph and story. I hope they can be loaned to a museum and that his daughter will be happier with the outcome.

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