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Guest The Crofter

Another MIC interpretation

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Guest The Crofter

I'm pretty new to this whole thing - any help would be appreciated.

I reckon because he got the Victory and the British he probably joined in 1916. He started in the Army service corp as a Driver (Driving what I don't know and why two Reg Nos.) then in the Engineers. Whats the roll and page bit all about?

post-31-1092425692.jpg

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Chris_Baker

Hello Crofter, welcome to the forum

Your man was a Driver in the horse sense, ie a he drove a team of horses, pulling a wagon.

The fact that he got the two medals does not imply that he joined after 1916, but that he disembarked in a theatre of war after 1 Jan 1916.

T4 prefix indicates a new army volunteer.

WR RE prefix indicates railway or inland waterways.

The medal roll and page references are a code to his entry in the original medal rolls.

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Jock Bruce

Crofter,

don't assume he joined in 1916 - lots of guys who joined earlier didn't go overseas until after 1 Jan 16. It is going overseas that qualifies him for the medals.

T prefix for ASC = horse transport. Motor transport would be 'M'.

WR prefix for RE seems to occur with 3 groups - Railways, Inland Water Transport and Roads & Quarries. WR/297xxx is probably Railways (numbers seem to allocated in different blocks to the 3 groups).

The roll bit refers to hie entry in the Royal Engineers medal roll - the card is an index to the roll.

I don't think there would be much to be gained from looking at the roll - I don't think the RE ones contain unit designations or anything useful like that.

Jock Bruce

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Jock Bruce

I should also say that the 335 ASC number may be a Territorial Force one.

Do you know where this chap was from ??

Jock Bruce

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Guest The Crofter

Thanks for your responses. I'll fill in one or two of the blanks. This was, or would have been, my great uncle (my grannies eldest brother). From his record on the CWGC site he ended up in the Salonika campaign with the 32 Railway Operating Coy. and from what your saying he seems to have been in a relatively "safe" billet, which adds to the conundrum as he died on 28/11/1918 "from wounds received the previous day".... which doesn't really fit very well with a horse team driver or indeed a railway driver....all this research and it just leads to more questions, I'm sure you've all experienced the same! In answer to your query, Jock, his mother lived in Stromeferry, Wester Ross.

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