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Corporal Eugene Jacques Bullard: First Black American Pilot

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Loader
23 hours ago, CROONAERT said:

 

No... after suffering a burglary (where all my family medals got stolen … got them all back though!) a few years back I've been extremely wary about framing irreplaceable items in wall displays. It's safely locked away with some other similar items in my study but regularly sees the light of day whenever I present my Foreign Legion talks (quite a few 'foreigners' in the legion transferred to the 170RI including the last 'American Legionnaire' to be killed in the war, who was serving as a captain in the 170th when he was killed).

 

Dave

Who was this last American FL killed as a Capt.? Sounds interesting as all of your FL postings are. Thanks

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CROONAERT
On ‎14‎/‎12‎/‎2018 at 01:49, Loader said:

Who was this last American FL killed as a Capt.? Sounds interesting as all of your FL postings are. Thanks

 

Ferdinand Capdeveille from New York, KiA on 3 Oct 1918 … Apologies… he was actually a sous-lieutenant.

 

The last American to die whilst actually still serving in the Legion (RMLE) was Sdt.2/Cl. Ivan Finney Nock from Bel Air, Los Angeles. He DoW on 9 January 1918.

 

Dave.

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Loader

Thanks for the info, so many foreign volunteers died serving France & UK & are not known today. Maybe in their hometowns but I tried to research one many yrs ago & no info at all even though the news article stated he was from a prominent family. The passage of time takes its toll. honorable men all & glad they' re remembered on here.

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CROONAERT
7 hours ago, Loader said:

... so many foreign volunteers died serving France & UK & are not known today... ... The passage of time takes its toll. honorable men all...

 

Indeed (although, like in an army, not 'all' were that honourable … one particular American in the Legion (who shall remain unnamed on here) was constantly slated by his comrades after the war for being a liar and a cheat and living on 'dead men's laurels') . However, the inscription chosen for the ossuary in the 'Legionnaire's Cemetery' at Souain (dedicated to Henry Farnsworth from Dedham, Mass. and funded by his family) sums it up well ...

 

"Nearby, in the Last Days of September 1915, Many Members of the French Foreign Legion - Men of Diverse Races and Creeds Who had Volunteered to Fight for Republican France, Liberty throughout the World and a better Future for Mankind - Laid down their Lives in Fierce Combat with the German Invaders. Their bones, with those of Other Soldiers of France Gathered from Hasty Graves, Lie in this Hallowed Enclosure.

 

These Men Gave their all of Human Joy and Hope. May their Supreme Sacrifice Inspire in Men of Other Lands and Times a Complete Devotion to Public Liberty Order and Peace.

 

Let Those Who Visit This Consecrated Ground Remember that the Men whose Names Live on these Walls Died in their Youth or their Prime that Future Generations might Inherit a Happier World and a Human Society more Righteous and more Loving than these Brave Men and their Generation Knew"

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