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Remembered Today:

Captain H M B LAWFORD 9th Bn., Royal Fusiliers


Anthony Pigott
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Does anyone know anything about this chap?

He's a relative of my wife - her Grandfather's cousin, in fact, whose two sisters I met while they were still with us.

I just have what's on the CWGC database so far, i.e.:

Captain HERBERT MARTIN BENSON LAWFORD

9th Bn., Royal Fusiliers

who died age 29

on 07 October 1916

Son of Martin Benson Lawford and Emily Agnes Lawford, of Trewern, Oswestry, Salop.

Thanks

Anthony

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Anthony:

I found this on the 1891 census-(listed as Herbert W.B. Lawford)(transcribers error)-

The origonal census page shows him as Herbert M.B. Lawford!

gordon

Name Age in 1891 Birthplace Relationship to head-of-house Civil parish County

Lawford, Agnes 6 Oswestry, Shropshire Daughter Oswestry Shropshire

Lawford, Emily A 34 Birkenhead Wife Oswestry Shropshire

Lawford, Herbert W B 3 Oswestry, Shropshire Son Oswestry Shropshire

Lawford, Martain B 34 Oswestry, Shropshire Head Oswestry Shropshire

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That's tremendous - thanks so much.

I hadn't realised his sister Agnes was quite so old. I last met her around 1980, I suppose. She was a lovely lady who was great fun to talk to. She ran the farm at Trewern with her 'younger' sister. Their brother's photograph was always there.

Thanks again.

Anthony

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Anthony:

Glad I could help!

gordon

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Anthony,

From the date of death and the battalion it is likely that Captain Lawford would have been KIA in the attack on Bayonet Trench north of Guedecourt/Flers. My uncle, Thomas Frederick Hooper, was a private in the 8th Bn Royal Fusiliers and was KIA in the attack on the same day and, although his body was found in 1917, he has no known grave. I have recently been to this area of France and have some photos which I would be happy to send you off line.

Regards,

Ray Hooper

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Anthony,

From the date of death and the battalion it is likely that Captain Lawford would have been KIA in the attack on Bayonet Trench north of Guedecourt/Flers. My uncle, Thomas Frederick Hooper, was a private in the 8th Bn Royal Fusiliers and was KIA in the attack on the same day and, although his body was found in 1917, he has no known grave. I have recently been to this area of France and have some photos which I would be happy to send you off line.

Regards,

Ray Hooper

Ray

That's very kind. I'll e-mail you.

Anthony

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  • 7 years later...
Guest John Lee

The Law Society's records show that Captain Lawford was a solicitor, having been admitted in October 1911. He was a member of Longueville & Co., of Oswestry. Information, obtained (presumably) from his family in 1920s is as follows: He obtained a commission in Royal Fusiliers at the outbreak of War and promoted Captain June 1915. Wounded March 1916 and returned to front in September 1916. Reported missing 7th October 1916 and subsequently officially reported killed in action that day.

Regards

John

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Anthony, Ray is correct, the following is an extract from Westlakes' 'Battalions on the Somme'

9th (Service) Battalion. 36th Brigade, 12th (Eastern) Division:

Moved from billets at Frechencourt to Nab trenches in support (1/7). To line at Ovillers (5/7). Heavy losses during attack on Ovillers (7/7). To Senlis (9/7), Forceville (10/7), Bus-les-Artois (11/7), Mailly-Maillet (20/7), Bois de Warnimont (24/7) , Bus-les-Artois (25/7), Hedauville (26/7), Bouzincourt (27/7), Albert (29/7). Successful attacks on 4th Avenue and Ration Trenches (3/8) and (4/8). To Varennes (9/8), Puchevillers via Lealvillers and Toutencourt (12/8), Vauchelles-les-Authie (I5/8). Transferred to Arras sector ( 16/8). Arrived Neuvillette (28/9). To Pommiers Redoubt (30/9), trenches west of Gueudecourt (6/10). To Gird support line (7/10) - heavy losses during attack on Bayonet Trench, To Bernafay Wood (8/10), front line Gueudecourt (16/10), Fricourt Camp (19/10), Burie (20/10).

Transferred to Arras sector (22/10).

Bayonet Trench can be seen to the top left below

post-15439-0-09549000-1335445047.jpg

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Promoted Lieutenant - 29th October 1914, to Captain 11th June 1915.

Dave

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I think the firm of solicitors is still in existence

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  • 4 years later...
Guest Guy Edwards

I knew HMBL's sisters well and my family owes them much - my father was in service to the Lawford family and was always very well treated.  I grew up on the Lawford estate. 

 

I recently discovered a webpage http://hmblawford.org.uk created by someone who obviously knows the family and has access to HMBL's letters.  I would love to be able to contact the author, but the 'leave a comment' facility appears not to work, even when logged in with a Wordpress account - so I have no way of contacting the owner. 

 

The solicitors' firm is still in existence - Longueville Gittins of Oswestry.

 

Trewern Hall, HBML's home, was sold-on many years ago, and the sisters, Agnes (who married Arthur Hamilton Bardswell) and Norah (who never married), moved into a smaller house in Hengoed, called Little Trewern.  Trewern Hall has since changed hands a number of times and has been renamed Hengoed Park which is now a specialist residential residential home.   The estate (especially the farm) was notable architecturally, not least for the use of 'yellow' Ruabon bricks - reportedly costing 6d each when it was built!  Part of the farm is now converted into housing, but sadly, much of it (including the engine and pump room) is in a state of disrepair.

Trewern Hall (Hengoed Park).jpg

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  • 1 month later...
On 1/29/2017 at 15:10, Guy Edwards said:

I knew HMBL's sisters well and my family owes them much - my father was in service to the Lawford family and was always very well treated.  I grew up on the Lawford estate. 

 

I recently discovered a webpage http://hmblawford.org.uk created by someone who obviously knows the family and has access to HMBL's letters.  I would love to be able to contact the author, but the 'leave a comment' facility appears not to work, even when logged in with a Wordpress account - so I have no way of contacting the owner. 

 

The solicitors' firm is still in existence - Longueville Gittins of Oswestry.

 

Trewern Hall, HBML's home, was sold-on many years ago, and the sisters, Agnes (who married Arthur Hamilton Bardswell) and Norah (who never married), moved into a smaller house in Hengoed, called Little Trewern.  Trewern Hall has since changed hands a number of times and has been renamed Hengoed Park which is now a specialist residential residential home.   The estate (especially the farm) was notable architecturally, not least for the use of 'yellow' Ruabon bricks - reportedly costing 6d each when it was built!  Part of the farm is now converted into housing, but sadly, much of it (including the engine and pump room) is in a state of disrepair.

Trewern Hall (Hengoed Park).jpg

 

A very interesting posting !

 

My family owned the pub at nearby Upper Hengoed, between 1981-2007; I believe that the last of the Lawford family had just passed away by then, but quite a few of our customers spoke fondly of them.  Interesting to read about the family and the hall - thank you for making the posting.

Edited by Andy Heaton
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