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Great War Stained Glass Memorials to fallen.


Lancashire Fusilier
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This is the stained glass window dedicated to 2nd Lt Stewart Alexander Miller-Hallett, 11th South Wales Borderers, KIA 11 July 1916, aged 25, while attached to his Brigade HQ. The church is St Martin-le-Tours, Chelsfield, Kent. I downloaded this image from the web in 2014, but forgot to note the source and can no longer find it. Can anyone help, please?

 

The scales suggests that this is St Michael with his heavenly host protecting humankind from the serpent/devil.

 

Mike

 

Miller.Hallett.Chelsford.jpg.dab1fdb376b48329daec067bcd44d4cc.jpg

Edited by Perth Digger
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  • 2 weeks later...

I think the window is actually portraying Michael, holding a set of scales - for weighing out the balance of men's lives - with his Angels driving away those judged as evil, bottom left, whilst protecting those judged as good, behind his raised right arm. The two angels in the quatrefoil at the top are holding crosses - the one on the right resembling the cross of Christ's crucifiction, whilst the one on the left holds a cross similar to a battlefield cross - linking Christ's sacrifice to that of a man fallen battle. From above, the light of Heaven shines - the message being that self-sacrifice leads to Glory.

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"there is still one form of Great War memorial which due to its form and location should be safe from such problems. These are the beautiful stained glass Great War memorial windows to the fallen located throughout Great Britain and Northern Ireland in many Churches, both large and small"

 

If that were only the case ….... and perhaps here's a warning from history …..

 

I have local knowledge of the 1921 War Memorial Window from the Unitarian Church in Newchurch, Lancashire which recorded 27 names of the fallen in the three small cartouches beneath the figures.  It is now officially "Lost".  The Church was demolished in the 1980's and the windows are known to have been sold to, and removed by, a Bristol architectural salvage firm.  Unsighted financial and practical considerations apart it is particularly tragic that all we have is the attached outline drawing from 1921 Church Calendar as no known photograph exists.

 

I wonder where it ended up?  

Bethlehem_Unitarian_War_Memorial.jpg

Edited by TullochArd
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Sorry not to have responded earlier, Bargingalong. Yes, looking at it again, I think your interpretation is probably better than mine, although it is unclear that those behind his arm are the saved being protected or just part of the heavenly host of protecting angels. 

 

Tulloch, the loss of memorial windows has unfortunately occurred fairly often, for different reasons (with chapel windows being most at risk as more of them seem to have been closed as denominations lose their congregations). I believe one window still exists in what is now a pub in Nottingham and there are examples of windows now in private houses following the deconsecration of buildings. Losses owing to bomb damage during WW2 are another feature. Tonbridge School lost a number of windows when its chapel burnt down in the 1980s. I am sure there many other examples.

 

Mike

 

 

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19 hours ago, Perth Digger said:

Sorry not to have responded earlier, Bargingalong. Yes, looking at it again, I think your interpretation is probably better than mine, although it is unclear that those behind his arm are the saved being protected or just part of the heavenly host of protecting angels. 

 

Tulloch, the loss of memorial windows has unfortunately occurred fairly often, for different reasons (with chapel windows being most at risk as more of them seem to have been closed as denominations lose their congregations). I believe one window still exists in what is now a pub in Nottingham and there are examples of windows now in private houses following the deconsecration of buildings. Losses owing to bomb damage during WW2 are another feature. Tonbridge School lost a number of windows when its chapel burnt down in the 1980s. I am sure there many other examples.

 

Mike

 

 

Thanks Mike.  That's what happened here.  The Rossendale Free Press of April 1987 tells that "overwhelming problems of maintenance", and dwindling congregations, led to the decision to demolish and relocate. I live in hope that someone may one day read your thread and identify the windows so we can get a photo.    

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  • 6 months later...

Oathlaw War Memorial in Tannadice Parish Church

I have known about these windows for many years but have only just come across these beautifil pictures.

https://oathlawtannadice.org.uk/index.php/gallery/feature-oathlaw-windows.html

I have also found a detailed description what they represent/ mean. Perhaps a bit too long for this thread.

RM

Edit: Spelling!

Edited by rolt968
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7 minutes ago, rolt968 said:

Oathlaw War Memorial in Tannadice Parish Church

I have known about these windows for many years but have only just come across these beautifil pictures.

https://oathlawtannadice.org.uk/index.php/gallery/feature-oathlaw-windows.html

I have also found a deatiled description what they represent/ mean. Perhaps a bit too long for this thread.

RM

 

Wonderful link RM.  Please be advised the IWM War Memorial Register has a page for the Oathlaw War Memorial Windows but no image.  If you would like to discuss adding the image and your detailed description please PM me.  Regards. Ian. 

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