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Remembered Today:

Great War Stained Glass Memorials to fallen.


Lancashire Fusilier
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Window at St Peter & Paul parish church, Ormskirk. The upper panes depict the crests of the allied nations with the dates of the war on either end, and the following inscription below: "Greater love hath no man than this that a man lay down his life for his friends"

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There's also a window at St Elizabeth's RC church in Scarisbrick. Couldn't get a photo of the actual window as the altar was off limits, but I did get the attached details about the window. Dedicated to Sergent Marie Emmanuel Remy De Casteja of the French Army, whose family owned the Scarisbrick Estates at that time.

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Peter4447,

A very interesting point regarding the identifiable image of 2/Lt Hellyer, I wonder if there are any other window memorials with an identifiable image of the person being commemorated.

LF.

Hi LF

There is an example here in New Zealand of two Maori Pioneers

- 2nd Lt Henare Kohere Kohere-Henare-Mokena-World-War-I-1914-19

and Capt Pekama Kaa Kaa-Pekama-Territorial-Military-Service-

33486-enz.jpg

See also better description here.

http://www.nzhistory.net.nz/media/photo/tikitiki-church-war-memorial

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Childwall All Saints, Liverpool: memorial window by stairs to back gallery, in memory of Lieut Montague Forwood Ainslie, dow April 1916, son of the vicar.post-16536-0-61716900-1381846448_thumb.j

He was in 12th (Service )Battalion, King's Liverpool Regiment.

Daggers

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  • 4 months later...

To Lancashire Fusilier

I am an LF ( well RRF but served in Bury and Ashton so maybe it counts?)

I am undertaking some research on Capt A V Clegg because he was a member of a military freemasons lodge in Manchester of which I am the secretary.

I am due to give a short resume on the lodge members who died in action in WW1 but have little on this brother. I will be contacting the museum in Bury but can you add anything? Photo etc?.

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I am undertaking some research on Capt A V Clegg because he was a member of a military freemasons lodge in Manchester of which I am the secretary.

Mike,

Unfortunately, I do not have a photograph of Capt. A. V. Clegg of the 6th Battalion Lancashire Fusiliers, who is recorded as having been killed in action on 7th August, 1915 during the Gallipoli Landings, and is buried on Gallipoli. :poppy:

I did however, find a website that lists having a photo of Capt. A. V. Clegg, and although they charge a small fee to download the photo, it may be worth it to complete your WW1 project.

Here is a link to that website, and Capt. A. V. Clegg is listed under ' 6th Battalion ' :-

Here is also a link to a Gallipoli Landings website, which lists Capt. A. V. Clegg's grave number on Gallipoli :-
Hope this information is of assistance to you.
Regards,
LF
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Mike, have you seen the recently-published book 'The Gallipoli Oak' by Purdy and Dawson about 6th LF at Gallipoli? Unfortunately the book doesn't have an index. Clegg is certainly mentioned but I don't think that there is a lot about him. His picture is not amongst the photogravure illustrations in the middle.

The book does record that 'Rochdale businessman and scientist' Captain Clegg was killed early on leading his company in the second wave of the attack on the Vineyard on 7th August.

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  • 3 months later...

Bungay Holy Trinity in Suffolk has a window dedicated to all those from the Parish who fell in the Great War

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Notre-Dame de Lorette. - the world's largest French military cemetery.

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The Basilica at Notre Dame de Lorette which contains the Stained Glass window from the previous post.

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  • 1 month later...

BULLOCH Anthony Alex Talbot. Flying Officer 33224, , 224 Squadron, Coastal Command. Born 24th August 1916. Killed in action 24th April 1940. He was the son of John Lytle and Agnes Marion Evelyn of Craigavad, near Bangor, County Down, Northern Ireland. This window is in Holy Trinity, Church,Glencraig, County Down

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  • 7 months later...

With reference to post #36, here is the stained glass window commemorating Lt Colonel Charles Doughty-Wylie, VC, RWFpost-6412-0-02503800-1430172632_thumb.jp

The window is in St Peter's Church, Theberton, Suffolk.

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With reference to post #36, here is the stained glass window commemorating Lt Colonel Charles Doughty-Wylie, VC, RWFattachicon.gifDoughty Wylie windowx.jpg

The window is in St Peter's Church, Theberton, Suffolk.

A beautiful stained glass window, and another rare example of the commemorated officer's actual likeness being depicted in the painting.

Regards,

LF

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I don't think (t)his stained glass memorial window has been added to the tread.

The window is to the memory of all those who served in the Leinster regiment. Window is located in St. Brendan's Church in Birr and as far as I am aware it is the only War memorial in a Catholic church in Ireland.

Stephen

Not so! I am late to this thread, but can say that there are several, if not many, war memorials in Catholic churches in Ireland.

The usual reason given for the lack of memorials in Catholic churches is that, after the Easter Rising of 1916, sentiment turned against Irishmen who had served in the British Army. A more important reason, in my opinion, is that Catholic churches had no tradition of putting up memorials of any kind. Few Catholic churches in Ireland have any memorials at all. A small brass plate on the back of a pew was the usual memorial, but there are occasional ones of the type found in other churches .

Here is an example, relevant to this thread, of a stained glass window in a Catholic church, the Church of the Assumption in Wexford Town. It is to Lt. William Henry O'Keefe (sic), killed in action in France on May 19th, 1917.

Michael

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I agree with with an earlier contributer that the majority of these wndows remember the "officer corp" which inturn represented the monied classes, they are the only ones who could afford the expence of creating such windows. Never the less they should still be recorded as they are beautiful works of art.

Perhaps all these immiges above shoulddbe sent to the National Inventry as I believ they still up grade the site to add new information.

Richard

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There is evidence of bias in the comment by RJPreston (Post 293).

Firstly, although the previous contributor referred to (keithgr, Post No. 13) complained that “they all seem to be in honour of officers from a wealthy family.”, he was mistaken. Of the nine windows referred to in the thread that far, five were to officers and four to all ranks - hardly ‘all’ to officers.

Secondly, why the reluctance to admit that officers were worth memorialising: ‘the majority of these windows remember the “officer corp” ... Never the less they should still be recorded as they are beautiful works of art’. Does this mean that, if they were not works of art, they would not be worth recording?

If someone suggested that it was not worth recording memorials to Other Ranks, he or she would be denounced as a snob.

Michael

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  • 1 month later...

Not so! I am late to this thread, but can say that there are several, if not many, war memorials in Catholic churches in Ireland.

The usual reason given for the lack of memorials in Catholic churches is that, after the Easter Rising of 1916, sentiment turned against Irishmen who had served in the British Army. A more important reason, in my opinion, is that Catholic churches had no tradition of putting up memorials of any kind. Few Catholic churches in Ireland have any memorials at all. A small brass plate on the back of a pew was the usual memorial, but there are occasional ones of the type found in other churches .

Here is an example, relevant to this thread, of a stained glass window in a Catholic church, the Church of the Assumption in Wexford Town. It is to Lt. William Henry O'Keefe (sic), killed in action in France on May 19th, 1917.

Michael

attachicon.gifWindow 1.jpg

Hi Michael,

I agree with you, I wasn't as well up on memorials as I am now when I made the inital post, I have noted at least one other Catholic Church in Co. Offaly with a War memorial to an officer who was killed in the Crimea.

Stephen

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Hi Michael,

I agree with you, I wasn't as well up on memorials as I am now when I made the inital post, I have noted at least one other Catholic Church in Co. Offaly with a War memorial to an officer who was killed in the Crimea.

Stephen

Hi, Stephen,

I would be very glad if you would record the memorial (and any other memorials in the church) for the Inventory of Irish War Memorials. Details of what is needed for a record can be found on the 'How to contribute' page of the website. The project includes memorials to all conflicts, not only the world wars.

Michael

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  • 5 months later...
Guest simonereeves_1

Chris,

This is an amazing window, and probably quite rare, in that it commemorates 3 brothers, all killed in action during WW1.

I was able to identify all three brothers, and attach photographs of each of the three brothers :-

Second Lieutenant (2nd Lt) Henry Clinton Foss, 28th Battalion. A farmer from Subiaco, WA prior to enlistment, 2nd Lt Foss embarked with the rank of Acting Corporal with C Company, 10th Light Horse Regiment from Fremantle on HMAT Surada on 17 February 1915. After promotion to Sergeant he was Mentioned in Despatches "for gallantry (when he) volunteered to bomb Turks from barricade on Kaiajik Aghala. (He) held on for 31 hours and repulsed 3 Turkish attacks on the barricade". Later he transferred to the 51st Battalion and then the 28th Battalion where, after successfully completing the appropriate training, he was promoted to 2nd Lieutenant. On 3 May 1917 he was killed in action, aged 29, and is commemorated on the Villers-Bretonneux Memorial. His two brothers, Captain Cecil Maitland Foss, also of the 28th Battalion, and 5969 Corporal Ernest Cecil Foss, 11th Battalion, were also killed in action.

These boys are my ancestors. They were a family of five. A sister also died 24 hours after giving birth to her first child, a stillborn baby girl, in 1917. The remaining sister died in 1980 and never married. This line of the family was essentially ended in WWI.

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These boys are my ancestors. They were a family of five. A sister also died 24 hours after giving birth to her first child, a stillborn baby girl, in 1917. The remaining sister died in 1980 and never married. This line of the family was essentially ended in WWI.

Many thanks, for the interesting follow up to the tragic story of the 3 brothers all killed in action.

Regards,

LF

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  • 2 weeks later...

Chris,

"This is an amazing window, and probably quite rare, in that it commemorates 3 brothers, all killed in action during WW1."

Just noticed this one. Here is a link to another window commemorating three brothers: http://www.irishwarmemorials.ie/Memorials-Detail?memoId=108; all three within twelve months.

Here's one to an only child: http://www.irishwarmemorials.ie/Memorials-Detail?memoId=157

Also, though not strictly relevant to this thread (not being a window), a memorial to five grandsons: http://www.irishwarmemorials.ie/Memorials-Detail?memoId=125

Michael

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Hadn't seen this thread before!

The memorial windows from Temple Street Methodist Chapel in Keighley. Now fully restored and in a beautiful display of stained glass in Cliffe Castle Museum. It's well worth a visit as they're all backlit and the colours are amazing. We also found the oak war memorial board with the names of the men earlier this year, it goes with these windows and it has recently been put on display at the museum:

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