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egbert

A good idea of hell

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egbert

Egbert

I'm not skipman but there are ereader versions and an online version here

http://www.archive.org/details/lettersfromacha00pellgoog

No PDF though.

Glen

Cheers Glen , you made it ! Thanks. So obviously the author has published the book under two different titles. I compared both versions and they are the same. (Seems to be that the title I mentioned is a 2003 reprint)So your link is the door opener to read the complete original book today.

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spof

I wasn't sure if it was available in English or only French so I found it by searching by the author's name.

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egbert

I am just reading it all day long - what makes me curious: on pages 41,48,50,56,68 and following he talks about the Germans in the opposing trenches and calls them "Dutch" as often as he called them "Germans". Is it common that the Germans were also called "Dutch" in English language?

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Aurel Sercu

Egbert,

Just wondering ...

Should I copy and paste here what I wrote 5 minutes ago on the Dutch WW1 Forum ? :-)

But anyway, my basic question : Is the English text a translation from an original French publication ? (Or from the original handwritten documents in French ?)

As long as we don't know the answer to that question ... I have browsed through the book itself, but can't find the answer ... :-(((

Aurel

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Doc2

I am just reading it all day long - what makes me curious: on pages 41,48,50,56,68 and following he talks about the Germans in the opposing trenches and calls them "Dutch" as often as he called them "Germans". Is it common that the Germans were also called "Dutch" in English language?

The classic usage of this term in American English is in relation to the farmers of German origin who still today reside in Pennsylvania, and are called the "Pennsylvania Dutch". Etymologically, this may have been derived from "Pennsylvania Deutsch", but in this period "Dutch" was used to describe anyone who spoke any of the Germanic Languages (including both German and Dutch). Thus, I don't think it would have been unusual for anyone from the NE United States at that period to have referred to the Germans as "Dutch". This usage goes back to the 17th Century, when there were references to "High Dutch" (i.e. Germans) and "Low Dutch" (i.e. people from the Netherlands). There is an old American Drinking song which talks about the "Highland Dutch" and the "Lowland Dutch"-- I have often wondered if this was a reference to Germans and Netherlanders, as there is not really much "highland" in the Netherlands. Doc

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Robert Dunlop

Thanks for that reminder, Doc2. This would fit with the subject of the letters having spent time in the NE USA. Presumably that is where the translator lived or hailed from.

Robert

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egbert

The author was raised indeed in the NE of the USA. So thanks Doc for solving the enigma!

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egbert

Just finished reading the book online. A very remarkeable and very recommended document for those interested in the Vosges mountain warfare and thoughts of a French soldier, having volunteered to serve his fatherland leaving his professor position in Stanford, USA!

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tipperary

Read it sunday egbert enjoyed it a lot the Vosges Fighting is something i know almost nothing of and i have been reading bits of late.Although at the start of the book we know the eventual outcome i think the sudden end is very real and says so much for how the end came for many.john

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