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Lancashire Fusilier

WW1 Military Motors - 1916 set x 50 cards

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Lancashire Fusilier

Loading the massive 1400 lb shells into a 15 inch ' Grannie ' Howitzer.

LF

IWM This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

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Lancashire Fusilier

A formidable 15 inch Howitzer in the Englebelmer Wood on the Somme, September 1916.

LF

IWM This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

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BSM

Nice pic. Try again.... LF post 2300. A Royal Marine 15in Siege Gun as you say LF....possibly No.4. Gun R.M.A. according to an AIF Corps record I have a copy of. Article and caption to an image copy in the "Times History of the War" indicated that they were firing in support of Australian Infantry at the time the image was taken! Rod

Edited by BSM

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GRANVILLE

Excellent set of photos of the gunners at work.

David

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Lancashire Fusilier

Nice pic. Try again.... LF post 2300. A Royal Marine 15in Siege Gun as you say LF....possibly No.4. Gun R.M.A. according to an AIF Corps record I have a copy of. Article and caption to an image copy in the "Times History of the War" indicated that they were firing in support of Australian Infantry at the time the image was taken! Rod

Rod,

Here is another 15 inch Howitzer with an Australian connection, which the AMW lists as being Gun No.2 operated by the Royal Marine Artillery, and it is shown in action near the Menin Road, Ypres Sector, firing in support of advancing Australian troops on 4th October, 1917.

Only 12 of these Behemoths were constructed during WW1 by the Coventry Ordnance Works, and they could hurl a 1400 lb shell 10,975 yards.

Regards,

LF

AWM This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

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Lancashire Fusilier

Excellent set of photos of the gunners at work.

David

David,

The Gunners very hard work began long before the first shell was even fired, with that mammoth 94 ton Gun having to be carefully secured in place, here is a photograph of Royal Garrison Artillery Gunners ' Digging in ' their 15 inch Howitzer in Englebelmer Wood in the Somme on 22nd November 1916.

Regards,

LF

IWM This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

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GRANVILLE

David,

The Gunners very hard work began long before the first shell was even fired, with that mammoth 94 ton Gun having to be carefully secured in place, here is a photograph of Royal Garrison Artillery Gunners ' Digging in ' their 15 inch Howitzer in Englebelmer Wood in the Somme on 22nd November 1916.

Regards,

LF

IWM This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

LF.

A very good point often overlook. The weights of some of the artillery pieces and how they were man-handled from site to site beggar belief at times.

David

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Lancashire Fusilier

Two photographs which clearly show the considerable effort needed to man-handle the 15 inch Howitzer's massive 1400 lb shells up a ramp and onto the reinforced shell wagon, which could carry up to 9 shells.

LF

IWM These images are reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.


2

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post-63666-0-55095600-1409138195_thumb.j

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Lancashire Fusilier

Having fully loaded the reinforced shell wagon, it was then hauled from the ammunition dump site to the 15 inch Howitzer's location by an equally massive Daimler-Foster Tractor.



LF




IWM This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.



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Gardenerbill

If you were looking for an image to represent the industrialisation of warfare, you would be hard pressed to find a better one than post #2304, with the dessolate landscape in the background and the huge gun in the foreground.

Incidentally still a very enjoyable topic.

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GRANVILLE

Really excellent stuff on show!!

David

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Lancashire Fusilier

If you were looking for an image to represent the industrialisation of warfare, you would be hard pressed to find a better one than post #2304, with the dessolate landscape in the background and the huge gun in the foreground.

Incidentally still a very enjoyable topic.

The almost 3-D effect of the massive gun barrel against that ominous looking sky, makes it an excellent WW1 photograph.

Regards,

LF

Really excellent stuff on show!!

David

Thank you, lots more to come.

Regards,

LF

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Lancashire Fusilier
The massive 13 ton Daimler-Foster Heavy Tractor was a result of the War Office's suggestion that William Foster & Co. Ltd and the Daimler Motor Company collaborate to build a Heavy Tractor for the War Department, with Foster supplying the Heavy Tractor's bodywork and Daimler supplying the 6 cylinder 105 hp engine.
William Foster & Co. Ltd., were an established agricultural machinery company based in Lincoln, and they had expertise in designing and building heavy argrcultural tractors.
As a result of the collaboration, 97 Daimler-Foster Heavy Tractors were supplied to the War Department during WW1.
LF
IWM This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

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Lancashire Fusilier

This rear-view of the WD's Daimler-Foster Heavy Tractor shows the immense size of the Heavy Tractor, particularly the rear wheels.

LF

IWM This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

post-63666-0-09289200-1409224250_thumb.j

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johnboy

What are the tyres made of and any idea how they were fitted?

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Lancashire Fusilier

What are the tyres made of and any idea how they were fitted?

johnboy,

Looking at other photographs of the Daimler-Foster Heavy Tractor, it appears that the back wheels have no ' tyres ' they are actually treaded metal surrounds probably bolted directly to the wheel, and when they became too worn, they were removed and replaced.

Regards,

LF

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johnboy

I'll do some looking around. I can't see any fixings on the inside rim apart from what could be a couple of struts that seem to be attached to the centre of the rim. There also appears to be no fixings on the outside of the tread.

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GRANVILLE

I think they were strips of heavy duty, thick rubber, as per the front wheel bands of rubber. These were bolted direct onto the wheel rims and could be replaced when worn down to the point that grip was very poor. As the tractor was intended to work off-road, their wear would not be dramatic.

David

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johnboy

I have seen the rear wheels as being given as between 3'6'' and 8ft. dia.

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Scalyback

Taken the chap is seated in #2312 8ft would not be far off in comparison.

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phil@basildon

The treads would be either steel or rubber, the rubber ones for metaled roads and steel ones for off road.

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Lancashire Fusilier

An interesting variation, and the only example I have seen to date, where the Daimler-Foster's wheels have been modified to enable the Heavy Tractor to run on railway lines.

LF

This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

post-63666-0-51180300-1409310457_thumb.j

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johnboy

The front wheels look as if the tyres have been removed and are running on the rims. The rears? Perhaps the mudguards are hiding a deep groove in the tyres?

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GRANVILLE

That's a remarkable photo and never seen anything like this before. If you look at the offside rear drive wheel you can see its had a flange attached - it's hiding the top of the rail as a result. Excellent stuff.

David

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