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Lancashire Fusilier

WW1 Military Motors - 1916 set x 50 cards

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Lancashire Fusilier

A German Opel Staff Car, fitted with a variation of the metal spring shod tyres.

LF

This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

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johnboy

Can you imagine the noise on cobbled roads?

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Lancashire Fusilier

Another German Opel Staff Car fitted with metal spring shod tyres.

LF

This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

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Lancashire Fusilier

A captured German military bicycle, fitted with metal spring shod tyres.

LF

CNA H1036 This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

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Lancashire Fusilier

Unlike the Germans, who suffered from a severe shortage of rubber during WW1, the British had ample supplies of rubber imported from their vast rubber plantations which had been set up in the British Colonies of Malaysia, Ceylon and Singapore in the late 1800s.

In 1876, the British clandestinely obtained rubber-tree seeds from Brazil's rubber plantations in Amazonia, and at the Botanical Gardens at Kew in London, these seeds were used to produce rubber-tree plants, which through Kew's expert grafting procedures were developed onto saplings which were far superior to those rubber plants in Brazil's Amazonia. It was these superior rubber plants which were then sent to the British Colonies in Malaysia, Ceylon and Singapore where Britain's vast rubber plantations were established.

The raw rubber was then imported back into Britain, for processing into rubber products by the British rubber industry.

Much needed rubber tyres for Britain's military vehicles were one of the main uses for the imported rubber, and following the tyres manufacture in Britain, vast quantities of tyres were shipped to the British military, with one of the main destinations being the large ASC ( Army Service Corps ) transport depot strategically located in the port city of Rouen on the River Seine in the Upper Normandy Region of Northern France. This ASC transport depot, contained large stores of rubber tyres, and also facilities for the repair of rubber tyre inner tubes and for the fitting of tyres.

Over the coming days I shall be posting photographs of the work carried out at the ASC Transport Depot at Rouen, and also of the British tyre manufacturing process during WW1.

The first photographs taken in May 1918, show the enormous quantities of rubber tyres needed for British military vehicles on the Western Front, which were stored at the ASC's Transport Depot at Rouen, at a time when Germany's supply of rubber tyres had been so diminished to the point where German military vehicles were being fitted with substitute metal tyres. In these photos, ASC troops are stacking rubber tyres, supervised by an ASC Captain.

LF

IWM These images are reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

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Scalyback

A captured German military bicycle, fitted with metal spring shod tyres.

LF

CNA H1036 This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

Doubt you would of got much control, near as useless I would say. A perfect example of I need of a nail the kingdom was lost.

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johnboy

Wouldn't get a puncture though!

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Scalyback

Wouldn't get a puncture though!

The rear "tyre" has come away from the rim and looks a pain to redo outside of a workshop.

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johnboy

Also rather dangerous on cobbles.

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Scalyback

Also rather dangerous on cobbles.

Can't see any brake system of note, so looks a fixed wheel with you braking on your legs(ah la track bike) I now want to see an example in the flesh. I have ridden a "hobby horse" so this could be intresting to try.

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Lancashire Fusilier

Can't see any brake system of note, so looks a fixed wheel with you braking on your legs(ah la track bike) I now want to see an example in the flesh. I have ridden a "hobby horse" so this could be intresting to try.

Also rather dangerous on cobbles.

Same German bicycle, still leaning against the tree stump, different photo.

Also, after WW1 ended, Rubber tyres remained in very short supply in Germany, so again there were attempts at finding alternative methods for replacing rubber bicycle tyres with metal substitutes.

Regards,

LF

This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

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Lancashire Fusilier

Post WW1 German bicycle wheel, fitted with metal spring shod tyres.

LF

This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

post-63666-0-16077600-1402436243_thumb.j

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Scalyback

I would not go over 5mph on such a wheel! LF the National Bicycle musuem in mid wales would be intrested in any cycle based information from any nation.

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Lancashire Fusilier

An ASC ( Army Service Corps ) Sergeant and his men, rolling a large heavy lorry wheel with a badly worn tyre, off to the workshop where a Tyre Press would be used to remove the old tyre from the wheel and press on the new tyre. The men, are using a metal pole to stabilize the heavy wheel as it is rolled.

In the background, is part of the vast store of new tyres held at the ASC Base Depot at Rouen.

LF

IWM This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

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johnboy

Could the 'iron bar' be an old prop shaft?

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Lancashire Fusilier

Could the 'iron bar' be an old prop shaft?

johnboy,

A good suggestion, and based on this photograph of a WW1 period Thornycroft J Type chassis, it could very well be.

Regards,

LF

This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

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Lancashire Fusilier

To both remove a worn tyre from a wheel, and replace a new tyre on a wheel, a hydraulic Tyre Press was used.

A Tyre Press was installed at several of the ASC Motor Transport Depots, and in the attached two photographs we see the ' J Mobile Tyre Press ' located at the ASC Motor Transport Depot at Hesdin, a town in the Nord-Pas-de-Calais region of Northern France, some 87 miles North of Rouen.

The two photographs, dated 14th July 1918, show an ASC ( Army Service Corps ) Officer and his men working with various sizes and types of wheels, including large and heavy lorry wheels fitted with rear-wheel chain-drive cogs, removing the worn tyres and fitting new tyres, with the heavy tyres being swung onto the Tyre Press using a hoist.

To illustrate the enormous quantity of new tyres needed to keep the British military's vehicles on the road, the ' J Mobile Tyre Press ' at Hesdin alone, fitted 1160 tyres to the wheels of 580 lorries in a week. The hydraulic pressure used on the Tyre Press, was between 40 to 150 tons.


LF



IWM 9059 These images are reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.



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Lancashire Fusilier

A badly worn tyre on a large rear-wheel chain-drive lorry wheel is hung from a hoist awaiting placement on the hydraulic ' J Mobile Tyre Press ' at Hesdin, prior to the worn tyre being removed and the new tyre fitted. This photo, is dated 14th July, 1918.



LF




IWM These images are reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.


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johnboy

What happened to the old tyres? Burning them would have made a good smokescreen wind permitting.

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johnboy

A similar press with all the bits and pieces including the jacks.

IMG_5558.jpg

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Lancashire Fusilier

A similar press with all the bits and pieces including the jacks.

Nicely detailed photo of a hydraulic Tyre Press.

Regards,

LF

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Scalyback

Gentlemen you are a teaching me so much! PLEASE do continue. In time i shall find my own information and pictures to present.

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Lancashire Fusilier

What happened to the old tyres? Burning them would have made a good smokescreen wind permitting.

johnboy,

The Army's worn rubber tyres, of which there were enormous numbers, were returned to Britain where the rubber was re-cycled. We know for instance, that the ASC's Tyre Press at Hesdin, alone changed 1160 worn tyres in just one week, .

In the attached photo, we see a ' Peerless ' truck load of ex-military worn tyres being loaded onto a ship, probably at the port in Rouen, for shipment back to Britain.

LF

IWM These images are reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

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Lancashire Fusilier

Two photographs giving better details of the ASC ( Army Service Corps ) Motor Transport Depot's Tyre Press at Hesdin.

This particular Tyre Press, which was made in Birmingham, is operated by ASC men, supervised by an ASC officer.

LF

IWM These images are reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

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Lancashire Fusilier

Tyre Press at Hesdin.

LF

IWM These images are reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

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