Jump to content
Great War Forum

Remembered Today:

Lancashire Fusilier

WW1 Military Motors - 1916 set x 50 cards

Recommended Posts

GRANVILLE

Certainly one and the same vehicle. The central tree in the sepia photo is the same as the tree just right of centre in the B&W. Are the British or German with the horses?

David

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Lancashire Fusilier

Certainly one and the same vehicle. The central tree in the sepia photo is the same as the tree just right of centre in the B&W. Are the British or German with the horses?

David

I agree, and those are German troops with their peakless caps.

Regards,

LF

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Lancashire Fusilier

A memorial plaque in Ottawa, Canada, which was the home base for ' Brutinel's Brigade '.

The 1st Canadian Motor Machine Gun Brigade was organized in Ottawa in August 1914 as the Automobile Machine Gun Brigade No.1, under General Orders 150 and 152 of 15 September 1914. The brigade was commanded by Major R. Brutinel. It was mobilized at Ottawa and Valcartier Camp, and drew on recruits from across Canada, about half of whom were chauffeurs and mechanics. The cars, trucks and guns used by the brigade were donated by "prominent and patriotic citizens".

The brigade embarked at Quebec on 29 September 1914 aboard CORINTHIAN, disembarking in England on 20 October 1914. Its strength was 9 officers and 128 other ranks. The battalion arrived in France on 17 June 1915 where it was attached to the 1st Canadian Division and redesignated the 1st Canadian Motor Machine Gun Brigade. On 8 June 1918 the brigade absorbed Borden's Motor Machine Gun Battery as well as C and D Batteries of 18th Canadian Machine Gun Company. The brigade returned to Canada on 20 April 1919, was demobilized on 22 April 1919, and was disbanded by General Order 209 of 15 November 1920.

The brigade colours were presented at Carlisle, Cumberland on 29 March 1919 and were deposited in Christ Church Cathedral, Ottawa, on 4 May 1919.

LF

This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

post-63666-0-28902500-1401886110_thumb.j

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Lancashire Fusilier
When originally formed in Ottawa, Canada in August 1914, Brutinel's Brigade was officially designated the 1st Canadian Automobile Machine Gun Brigade, and when the Brigade arrived in France on 17th June 1915, it was re-designated the 1st Canadian Motor Machine Gun Brigade.

In addition to the 20 armoured vehicles supplied to the Brigade by the American Autocar Motor Company, a quantity of Autocar support vehicles were also supplied, and in the attached series of scarce photographs we can see those Autocar support vehicles in use at the Brigade's Ottawa Camp. Of note, are the early A.M.G.B. ( Automobile Machine Gun Brigade ) markings on the support vehicles.

The first photograph shows an Autocar A.M.G.B. Commander's vehicle, carrying the marking ' 1st A.M.G.B. Ottawa A Battery O.C. ', and in the background we can see some of the Brigade's 20 Autocar armoured vehicles, and other Autocar support vehicles.

LF

This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

post-63666-0-36902800-1401968399_thumb.j

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Lancashire Fusilier
Another scarce early photograph, again taken at the Brigade's Ottawa Camp, showing an Autocar ' Fuel ' support vehicle marked ' 1st A.M.G.B. Ottawa Fuel ' and designed to carry several large fuel drums.

In the background, are seen some of the Brigade's 20 Autocar armoured vehicles and some of the Brigade's Autocar support vehicles.

LF

This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

post-63666-0-04884500-1401968576_thumb.j

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Lancashire Fusilier

Again photographed at the Brigade's Ottawa Camp, one of the 20 armoured vehicles supplied by the American Autocar Motor Company, showing the armoured vehicle fitted with its original 2 Colt Browning machine guns, which upon the Brigade's arrival in England, were replaced by 2 Vickers machine guns.

In the background, can been seen other Autocar armoured vehicles and support vehicles.

LF

This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

post-63666-0-27042900-1401969107_thumb.j

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Lancashire Fusilier

An interesting photograph of the then Major Raymond Brutinel ( back to the camera ) the founder and Commanding Officer of the 1st Canadian Automobile Machine Gun Brigade, welcoming the Duke of Connaught to the Brigade. In this photo, we can see clear details of the back of the Autocar passenger vehicle, the rear suspension, the seating and the rear storage locker, this particular vehicle being for the Commanding Officer.

LF

This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

post-63666-0-11593000-1402052752_thumb.j

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Lancashire Fusilier

An American Autocar 1914 vehicle, the chassis for which, was used on the Autocar vehicles supplied to the 1st Canadian Automobile Machine Gun Brigade.

LF

This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

post-63666-0-75268800-1402060504_thumb.j

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Lancashire Fusilier

A superbly restored 1912 Autocar Omnibus, again using the same chassis as that used on the 1st Canadian Automobile Machine Gun Brigade's vehicles.

LF

These images are reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

post-63666-0-15833800-1402070121_thumb.j

post-63666-0-88270300-1402070126_thumb.j

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Lancashire Fusilier

A 1917 American Autocar advertisement depicting an Autocar vehicle used by the Coca Cola Company, again, this vehicle is using the same chassis as that used on the 1st Canadian Automobile Machine Gun Brigade's Autocar vehicles.



LF



This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.


post-63666-0-65523200-1402079171_thumb.j

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Scalyback

As always top work stuff!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Lancashire Fusilier

As always top work stuff!

Thank you, pleased to hear you are continuing to find the posts interesting.

Regards,

LF

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Lancashire Fusilier

Only one of the 20 original Autocar armoured vehicles supplied to the 1st Canadian Automobile Machine Gun Brigade still exits today, and it is on display in the Canadian War Museum in Ottawa, Canada, which was the home base for the Brigade.


Tracing the Brigade's Autocar armoured vehicles, we know that after serving in France, they were in Mons, Belgium in November 1918 ( see attached photo ), and then served with the Allied occupation forces in Germany after the Armistice, based in Bonn. Attached are two photos of a military funeral, where a Canadian Autocar armoured vehicle was used to transport the Union Jack draped coffin, I have no details of whom the funeral was for, or the circumstances of their death, perhaps someone may know those details.


At some point, the 1st Canadian Motor Machine Gun Brigade left Germany, and returned to Canada, along with at least one of their Autocar armoured vehicles, which spent time in service with the Montreal Militia in Canada in the 1920s ( see attached photo ), and it was that same Autocar used by the Montreal Militia, which is now on display in the Canadian War Museum, it being the only Autocar armoured vehicle still in existence.



The first photo shows a 1st Canadian Motor Machine Gun Brigade Autocar armoured vehicle taking part in a parade through the town square in Mons, Belgium in November, 1918.



LF




Canadian National Archives O3674 These images are reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.



post-63666-0-99283100-1402144665_thumb.j

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Lancashire Fusilier

Two photographs of a Canadian 1st Motor Machine Gun Brigade Autocar armoured vehicle, being used to carry the Union Jack draped coffin during a military funeral in Bonn, Germany in 1919.

At this time, I have no details of whom this funeral was for, or the circumstances of their death, perhaps someone knows those details ?

LF

CNA 4105/4114 These images are reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.


2

post-63666-0-97356400-1402145147_thumb.j

post-63666-0-04073800-1402145182_thumb.j

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Lancashire Fusilier

One of the original American made Autocar armoured vehicles previously in service with the 1st Canadian Motor Machine Gun Brigade on the Western Front during WW1, in a posed photograph showing a unit of the Canadian Montreal Militia, which used the armoured vehicle during the 1920s. The Autocar armoured vehicle had, and still has, bullet marks from its service during WW1.

This is this very same Autocar armoured vehicle, the only surviving example, which is now on display in the Canadian War Museum.

LF

This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

post-63666-0-57409900-1402145718_thumb.j

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Lancashire Fusilier

Three photographs of the only surviving Autocar armoured vehicle, shown in its original livery of the 1st Canadian Automobile Machine Gun Brigade. This Autocar armoured vehicle, is now on display in the Canadian War Museum in Ottawa, Canada.

LF

These images are reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

post-63666-0-14738400-1402146122_thumb.j

post-63666-0-51971000-1402146134_thumb.j

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Lancashire Fusilier

2

post-63666-0-26384000-1402146297_thumb.j

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Lancashire Fusilier

Exuberant Canadian troops riding in Autocar UF21 30 cwt trucks following their victory at the Battle of Flers-Courcelette ( Somme ) in September 1916, some of the troops are displaying their captured German war souvenirs.

LF

CNA0828 This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

post-63666-0-63609600-1402233508_thumb.j

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Lancashire Fusilier

Probably the same Autocar UF21 30 cwt. trucks, seen from the back.

LF

IWM This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

post-63666-0-64011900-1402233889_thumb.j

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Lancashire Fusilier

To round off my posts relating to the Canadian 1st Motor Machine Gun Brigade and their Autocar vehicles, a photo of some of the troops from the 1st Canadian Motor Machine Gun Brigade who made it back after WW1, a photo of one of their uniform jackets, and their collar badge.

LF

These images are reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

post-63666-0-31517500-1402234213_thumb.j

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Lancashire Fusilier

Canadian 1st Motor Machine Gun Brigade uniform jacket.

LF

This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

post-63666-0-64182200-1402234358_thumb.j

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Lancashire Fusilier

Canadian 1st Motor Machine Gun Brigade collar badge.

LF

This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

post-63666-0-95871200-1402234549_thumb.j

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Andrew Upton

Probably the same Autocar UF21 30 cwt. trucks, seen from the back.

Definitely the same two trucks, note the serial numbers on both vehicles are sequential (786 and 787), plus the same chap with his greatcoat folded over his arm appears in both shots.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Lancashire Fusilier

Definitely the same two trucks, note the serial numbers on both vehicles are sequential (786 and 787), plus the same chap with his greatcoat folded over his arm appears in both shots.

Andrew, Thanks for pointing out the vehicle's numbers, and well spotted the soldier with the greatcoat.

Regards,

LF

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Lancashire Fusilier

Following the outbreak of WW1, the Allies were able to implement a very effective blockade of Germany using the British Royal Navy, with the French Navy deployed in the Mediterranean to blockade the Austro-Hungarian Adriatic ports.


As early as November 1914, Britain and her Allies were depriving Germany of much needed imports of raw materials for the German war effort. One such imported raw material was rubber, which was vital for German military vehicle's rubber tyres.


As their supply of rubber diminished, Germany looked for other ways to replace rubber tyres, and although German Chemists had some success producing synthetic rubber, it came too late in the war to be of any real use to the Germans.


One raw material which was available to the Germans was steel, and with this material we can see much innovation and ingenuity by the Germans to come up with designs for ' metal tyres ' for their vehicles as a substitute for rubber tyres. One such design, involved the use of metal springs positioned between the wheel and the outer rim, which acted as shock absorbers. These metal spring shod wheels were fitted to German military motor vehicles and also bicycles during WW1, and seem to have had some success.


Attached, are some photographs of these German ' metal tyres '.



The first photo shows good details of the metal tyre's construction, as used on a German Opel Staff Car.



LF




IWM 92908 This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.



post-63666-0-17859400-1402319275_thumb.j

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...