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Lancashire Fusilier

WW1 Military Motors - 1916 set x 50 cards

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Steve hiscox
On Monday, August 25, 2014 at 12:18, Lancashire Fusilier said:
The Nordenfelt - Erith, Kent Connection
 
Thorsten Nordenfelt (1842-1920), was born in Orby outside Kinna, Sweden, the son of an Army colonel. Thorsten worked for a Swedish company in London from 1862 to 1866 and emigrated to England in 1867, at which time he married Emma Stansfeld Grundy. The 1881 Census shows the Nordenfelt family as living at Leinster Lodge on the Uxbridge Road, Paddington in West London.

In 1887 Thorsten Nordenfelt and his brother-in-law started a small business to trade Swedish steel used for British train rails. Later, he founded the Nordenfelt Guns & Ammunition Company Ltd., to finance and develop a machine-gun designed by fellow Swede Helge Palmcrantz that would known as the ' Nordenfelt ' gun. His company also designed a range of anti-torpedoboat guns in calibres from 37 to 57 mm, which were produced at the Nordenfelt factory in Erith, Kent.

Under pressure from Rothschild and Vickers his company merged with Maxim in 1888 to form TheMaxim Nordenfelt Gun and Ammunition Company.

After a personal bankruptcy, Nordenfelt was forced out of the Nordenfelt-Maxim company in 1890 and left England for France, where his new company, Société Nordenfelt, designed the eccentric screw breech used on the French 75 gun. In 1903, he returned to Sweden and retired.

The public house known as the ' Nordenfelt Tavern ' ( photograph attached ) at 181 Erith Road, Erith, Kent was built in 1902, and is named after the local Nordenfelt factory, whose workers frequented the pub in Edwardian times.

LF

 

This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

post-63666-0-39013300-1408965510_thumb.j

I know this post was a while ago but my my wife's aunt and uncle ran the pub for 20 years.

The locals called the pub the pom pom .

I'm currently trying to get them to let me see any artifacts and photos of the pub during the greatwar. 

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tom q vaxy
On ‎18‎/‎12‎/‎2011 at 17:58, Lancashire Fusilier said:

Cigarette Cards in album.

LF

post-63666-0-50786100-1324249117.jpg

beautiful piece for the library

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David B

I have just come across and joined this Forum and particular thread which is a goldmine.  Thank you to all, especially LF.  

 

I hope I am not duplicating a previous post (I have not found any in a search) so am drawing attention to a sale held by Bonhams back in June 2014 when, amongst more than 1250 lots, were sold a 1913 Wolseley CR type lorry in WD livery (Lot 1227), a 1914 Hallford lorry (Lot 1229), also in WD, an FWD lorry (Lot 1228) and a 1914 Leyland S-type "Subsidy B" 30cwt dropside lorry (Lot 1232).  In the catalogue are a host of detailed images of each, too many to post here.

 

The vehicles covering the era of interest begin around Lot 1223 and go through to Lot 1252.  There were innumerable other artefacts in the sale, some of which I am sure will be of interest.

 

The whole catalogue:  https://www.bonhams.com/auctions/22201/

The Wolseley:  https://www.bonhams.com/auctions/22201/lot/1227/

The Hallford:  https://www.bonhams.com/auctions/22201/lot/1229/?category=list&length=10&page=114

The FWD:  https://www.bonhams.com/auctions/22201/lot/1228/?category=list&length=10&page=114

The Leyland:  https://www.bonhams.com/auctions/22201/lot/1232/?category=list&length=10&page=114

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MikeyH

David,

 

Welcome to the Forum, LF has sadly not been an active poster for some time.

Yes, I can recall the sale of the late Michael Banfield's amazing collection, which

realised around three million pounds.

 

Mike.

Edited by MikeyH

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Dai Bach y Sowldiwr

Here's a pic I have intended posting for a while.

I think it's a Sentinel Standard with an Anglesey registration, EY 1378.

This is another steam lorry, showing the local council road crew including my grandfather (far left).

This model was manufactured between 1906-1922, and the registration plate is somewhere between 1903 and 1932.

I'd put the picture at early to mid 1920s.

My grandfather was employed by a local garage to demonstrate its steam traction engines on local farms at the outbreak of war, attested under the Derby scheme in 1915, and called up in 1916. Allocated to the ASC (MT), and ended up driving Caterpillars and lorries, going back to this after demob in late 1919.

 

 

Sentinel Standard.jpg

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GWF1967
12 minutes ago, Dai Bach y Sowldiwr said:

Here's a pic I have intended posting for a while.

I think it's a Sentinel Standard with an Anglesey registration, EY 1378.

This is another steam lorry, showing the local council road crew including my grandfather (far left).

This model was manufactured between 1906-1922, and the registration plate is somewhere between 1903 and 1932.

I'd put the picture at early to mid 1920s.

My grandfather was employed by a local garage to demonstrate its steam traction engines on local farms at the outbreak of war, attested under the Derby scheme in 1915, and called up in 1916. Allocated to the ASC (MT), and ended up driving Caterpillars and lorries, going back to this after demob in late 1919.

 

 

Sentinel Standard.jpg

Great photo Doc'.

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Scalyback
7 minutes ago, GWF1967 said:

Great photo Doc'.

 

Council  workers leaning on works vans since 1919. 

 

Dai was he mechanical or steam? I have two medals to ASC steam men. 

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Dai Bach y Sowldiwr
2 hours ago, Scalyback said:

Dai was he mechanical or steam? I have two medals to ASC steam men. 

Caterpillar Tractors, so internal combustion MT rather than steam.

Do you know which companies?

 

2 hours ago, Scalyback said:

 

Council  workers leaning on works vans since 1919.

 

"A 'ole 'ave appeared in the road near Llangefni. Six council workers and a lorry 'ave been dispatched to look into it..."

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adrianbs

  Hi   Folks   I would not like to appear to be trying to teach Grandma how to suck eggs but I have been interested in the 13.5"; 14" and 18" rail mounted artillery for over 60 years and I find there is some discrepancy in some of the posts nos 5580 and 5586 plus 5588 and 5605, The photos clearly do not all show the same types of 18" barrels, specifically because of the diameter and lengths of the Breech section. There are also right and left opening breech mechanisms shown. 

  Could I suggest there is some confusion between the experimental 18" GUN barrel and the 18" HOWITZER barrel. The latter was fitted to the railway mounts and has a longer, smaller diameter Breech whilst the larger diameter, shorter breech is probably the naval gun barrel. Can anyone who is interested, try to clarify.  I noticed the just released 4mm models of "Boche Buster"  and  " Gladiator", as produced by Oxford Rail, both have the wrong barrels fitted since both are fitted with a " 18" Howitzer barrel" whilst in WW1  "Boche Buster" had a 14"  Gun barrel and in WW2  "Gladiator" had a 13.5" Gun barrel. "Scene Shifter" did receive an 18" barrel after WW1 for test firing but it had a 13.5" barrel fitted in WW2 so that it's range just reached the French coast. "Piece Maker" made up the trio of Rail Guns with only "Boche Buster" being a 18" Howitzer.

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adrianbs

 Hi  Folks   Further investigation of the 18" barrel exhibited at Crystal Palace provided many more photos of the item which clearly indicate that this was NOT the 18" Howitzer barrel of the type fitted to the Railway mountings after WW1 ended.  It is a lightweight mock-up of the 18" Naval gun of which just 3 were made and which did get used in anger in WW1.  The use of the word Howitzer with some captions is clearly a mistake and I would imagine the mock-up probably only weighed in at less than 10 tons in view if the small crane being used to lift it. An interesting aspect of one picture is that the barrel was transported by rail at one stage on a WW1  "Parrot" ( later "Warflat" )  wagon designed for carrying tanks in France during the latter part of the war.

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Grain Kitten
On 01/11/2013 at 16:29, Lancashire Fusilier said:

German ' Halberstadt ' aircraft, brought down by French Anti-Aircraft fire.

LF

post-63666-0-61552300-1383323374_thumb.j

This is not a Halberstadt, it is an A.E.G G.IV

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Grain Kitten
On 13/05/2015 at 17:23, Lancashire Fusilier said:
Two photographs showing the RFC/RAF/RNAS' use of the ' Bessanneau Hanger '.
The first photograph, taken in June 1918, shows an aerial view of the Royal Naval Air Service ( RNAS ) aerodrome at Dunkirk, on the northern French coast, with 13 Handley Page Type 0/400 bombers of No. 14 Squadron RNAS lined up ready to start on a bombing raid. Also shown, are several ' Bessanneau Hangers ' erected at that aerodrome.
 
LF

This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

post-63666-0-88668700-1431534229_thumb.j

I've been working my way through this topic from the start for the last couple of weeks, so I've come to this very late. I found the topic while searching for info on the Seabrook lorries.

The caption of this picture has at least two errors. Although 14Sqn RNAS flew Handley Pages, the aircraft shown are not HP O/400s, which were large twin-engine bombers with 100ft wingspan, so this is not 14 Sqn (or 214 Sqn, which it would have been by June 1918)
It's difficult to be sure, but they may be DH4 or DH9s, another guess would be FE2b/d pushers, since I can't really see any fuselages. The only RNAS squadron to operate FE2s was 16/216 Sqn, but that wasn't based at either of the Dunkirk airfields and from what I can find had passed all of them on to No.100 Sqn in May 1918

Steve

 

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Grain Kitten
On 20/10/2015 at 14:10, Lancashire Fusilier said:

For some reason, a returning DH 4 failed to make a safe runway landing, and instead crashlanded on the roof of one of the airfield's hangers. Fortunately, it appears that the crew were able to make it out of the wrecked DH 4.

LF

IWM This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

post-63666-0-54895000-1445346587_thumb.j

I think you'll find that's an Avro 504,  note the short nose and round cowling for the rotary engine, and round rudder with no fin.

Steve

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Grain Kitten
On 23/10/2015 at 18:29, Lancashire Fusilier said:

With reference to post #4110 and the aircraft shown immediately behind the two officers, that aircraft's registration number shown on the tail fin, looks to have had the final number erased, possibly by the Censor, however, it still looks readable and is possibly D 1728.

If that is correct, that aircraft registration number belonged to a DH 9, which while being flown by Lt. T.C. Story on August 16th, 1918, made a bad landing and although the Pilot was uninjured, the aircraft was badly damaged.

LF

IWM This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

post-63666-0-43975000-1445621349_thumb.j

Serial numbers were outlined in white where they ran onto the dark colours of the rudder stripe. Nothing to do with the censor this time. Yes it is a DH9, as is the aircraft in the background, the cockpit configuration is distinctive.

Steve

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Gardenerbill

Hi Steve,

The two images you have called out as incorrectly described in post #5713 and #5714 are both from the IWM collection and could be mislabelled on their website, have you checked?

The original poster will not respond as he hasn't been on the forum since December 2016.

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Grain Kitten

Mark, I've often found errors in IWM captions, and have sent them corrections, but I'm not sure they always follow up. I'll see if i can find them on the IWM.

Steve

Found the pictures on the IWM and sent them my thoughts. On the IWM page the image on #5723 is labelled as  Treizennes , not Dunkirk.

 

Auto-reply from the IWM -

" Due to the high number of enquiries we are currently receiving, we will be prioritising those concerning ticketing and bookings and questions about visits to our branches. We will get back to you as soon as we can. If your enquiry is non-urgent it may take us a little longer to respond."

Edited by Grain Kitten
actions taken since original post

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Gardenerbill

Hi Steve,

It's always good when forum members correct old posts, I have fallen foul of incorrect information in old topics before, keep up the good work.

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Grain Kitten

I'm happy to do it, I'm just a few years later than optimum.

 

I originally found this topic looking for information on the Seabrook-Standard truck, does anyone have any basic dimensions for this vehicle,just teh wheelbase and track would be enough for me to base a small scale model on. I was stood where this picture was taken just a few days ago.

Steve

Seabrook seen leaving the Portholme workshops in 26 St Johns St.jpg

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Great War Truck

Does Huntingdon look much different now? There is not much info on Seabrooks but the wheelbase was 12 feet and the track was six feet. I will see if I can find out anything else.

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Grain Kitten
On 23/04/2019 at 20:37, Great War Truck said:

Does Huntingdon look much different now? There is not much info on Seabrooks but the wheelbase was 12 feet and the track was six feet. I will see if I can find out anything else.

The factory has been replaced by a terrace of houses, with a more modern industrial building behind. The house on the right has gone too, again replaced by a terrace of four houses, at the end of which is a house like the one in the photo. Why or when this was done I haven't been able to find out.

Thanks for the measurements, those dimensions are enough for me to scale the rest of the truck, so don't worry about finding anything else.

Steve

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Charawacky
On 30/06/2016 at 22:14, phil@basildon said:

It could also be a 'Stepney' spare wheel. The Stepney wheel consisted of a rim and tyre that clipped onto the original wheel.

The NAP tyre illustrated in post 5226 above is attached to a Stepney rim. Its possible that Stepney wheels were carried and attached and removed as and when required.

 

This is not a Stepney Wheel but the twin carried for use on both front and rear axle evidenced by the front wheel having been removed and left on the ground behind the Tender

large (1).jpg

other6.jpg

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Marilyne
On ‎28‎/‎09‎/‎2014 at 17:29, Lancashire Fusilier said:

The badly damaged stern of HMS Zulu, blown off by a German mine near Dunkirk on 8 November 1916.

LF

This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

post-63666-0-96952800-1411918164_thumb.j

 

Just resurrecting this thread for one question… that a Naval-minded Pal might answer…

In her memoirs, Pat Beauchamps, FANY & intrepid ambulance driver mentions the Zule hitting a mine and being towed to the French coast (she sais Boulogne though…) She then goes on by saying: "After driving some cases over there, I went to see the remains in dry dock. It was a ghastly sight […] The only humorous incident that occurred was that King Albert was arrested while taking a photo of it! I don't think for a moment they recognized who he was, for, with glasses, and a slight stoop, he does not look exactly like the photos one sees, and they probably imagined he was bluffing."

does anybody have some elements that might confirm this story???

 

M.

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