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Remembered Today:

WW1 Military Motors - 1916 set x 50 cards


Lancashire Fusilier

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Keith,

Here are 2 excellent photographs which show ' Popham ' signal panels used for visual ground to aircraft signalling.

These 2 photographs show American troops using the signalling panels near the village of Beauval, which was on the main road between Amiens and Doullens, some 14 miles North of Amiens in the Somme region of Northern France.

The photographs are dated 30th July, 1918.

This type of fabric ground to aircraft signalling system, also ties in with Mike's excellent information.

Regards,

LF

IWM This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

Hi

The Popham 'T' Panel was used for Air/Infantry communication from Battalion HQ upwards, replacing the cloth 'Shutter Panel' used previously. It was trialled during 1917 and introduced into service during 1918. It was also used for Air/Cavalry and Air/Tank communication. The Artillery also started using them after the end of the war (appears in the 1920 edition of SS131), although it is possible that it may have been used by some artillery units before the end of the war.

These pictures actually differ slightly from the operating manual diagram (see below) in that the bottom arms have the cover folding back in a different direction. It is possible that there may have been a 'large' and 'small' type, as there was originally with the shutter panel, or just various prototypes. The original ones used black cloth with white American cloth, later they were blue cloth.

Mike

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Aimée Fox-Godden's talk at the Conference last weekend was about how techniques learned from the Somme were transferred to other theatres. She showed that the main thrust of the various WO pamphlets was usually taken up but that certain aspects would be altered, adapted or simply ignored if they did not fit the particular conditions on the ground. The AA Diaries have no detail about the system used in Salonika but it's more likely to be an earlier variant, given the lengthy communication delays of the period.What I'm waffling about is to say that, although the experience on the Western Front may be recorded with specific meanings to the display patterns, an identical pattern in another theatre would not necessarily have precisely the same meaning.

I'm glad I asked. This segment has been a delightful experience. Thanks!

Keith

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Lancashire Fusilier

I'm glad I asked. This segment has been a delightful experience. Thanks!

Keith

Yes, a most interesting topic.

Regards,

LF

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Lancashire Fusilier

In this photograph, taken in Mesopotamia in 1917, both the Marconi ' Pack Wireless ' and it's power unit have been placed in separate Ford Model T trucks, as opposed to being carried on pack horses.

LF

This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

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Lancashire Fusilier

This photograph shows the ' Pack Wireless ' being used by Royal Engineers, and although there are civilians present, it is difficult to tell if this photograph was taken on the Home Front or the Western Front, I assume the Home front.

The Wireless Transmitter has been placed in the back of a covered cart, and the Wireless Operator has used his greatcoat to cover his legs.

The mast has been erected ( far left ) and a member of the unit is working on the wireless generator, with two civilians looking on.

LF

This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

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Lancashire Fusilier

The British provided equipment to their allies, and this photograph shows Serbian troops using the British 1500-watt Marconi ' Spark ' Transmitter.

This photograph also shows a good view of the two separate 2-wheeled carts, one housing the Transmitter, and the other housing the Transmitter's power unit, being joined together when the Transmitter was operational.

LF

This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

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Lancashire Fusilier

This photograph, shows the 1500-watt Marconi ' Spark ' Transmitter could be utilized by dual Wireless Operators.

LF

This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

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Lancashire Fusilier

3 final photographs relating to the Marconi ' Pack Wireless ' before moving on to a new topic.

The first photograph shows a pair of ' Douglas ' motorcycle sidecar combinations which have been adapted to carry a Marconi Pack Wireless, with one Douglas carrying the Wireless Transmitter and the other carrying the Mast and other equipment.

LF

This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

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Lancashire Fusilier

In this photograph showing the Marconi Wireless Transmitter prepared for use, It is interesting to note that the power unit for the Wireless Transmitter, is a belt-driven generator, which is permanently mounted on the crossbar above the petrol tank, with power to the generator coming directly from the motorcycle's engine via a drive-belt.

When operational, the Wireless Transmitter is moved from the motorcycle combination and mounted on a platform on the back of the motorcycle.

LF

This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

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Lancashire Fusilier

Italian inventor Guglielmo Marconi ( 25 April 1874 - 20 July 1937 ).

LF

This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

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Marconi schools were set up to train operators. At the beginning of the war Marconi Operators on Merchant ships were transferred to RN

Trained wireless operators were now in great demand. For some time Marconi’s had been stimulating the interest of wireless amateurs by offering prizes for competitors in Morse code examinations and by making Morse practice sets available. The Marconi Company's head of training was seconded to the War Office to organise an army wireless school at Crystal Palace, but the company was also expected to provide all the forces and branches of supply with the operators and instructors required.

Now the Company’s offices opened day and night, enrolling new recruits, instructing them on the art of wireless and examining them in Morse code. At the start of the war the Company undertook to find a further 2,000 operators to augment the 3,000 already serving on merchant ships. Purpose built class-rooms at King’s College and Birkbeck College were made available to ease the overload of trainees from Marconi House in London.

So great was the demand, that some of the pupils and enrolled scholars were as young as sixteen. The staff at Marconi House 'worked to the limits of their power and to the last ounce of their energy to meet the great emergency'.

From marconiheritage .com

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Lancashire Fusilier

Marconi schools were set up to train operators. At the beginning of the war Marconi Operators on Merchant ships were transferred to RN

Trained wireless operators were now in great demand. For some time Marconi’s had been stimulating the interest of wireless amateurs by offering prizes for competitors in Morse code examinations and by making Morse practice sets available. The Marconi Company's head of training was seconded to the War Office to organise an army wireless school at Crystal Palace, but the company was also expected to provide all the forces and branches of supply with the operators and instructors required.

Now the Company’s offices opened day and night, enrolling new recruits, instructing them on the art of wireless and examining them in Morse code. At the start of the war the Company undertook to find a further 2,000 operators to augment the 3,000 already serving on merchant ships. Purpose built class-rooms at King’s College and Birkbeck College were made available to ease the overload of trainees from Marconi House in London.

So great was the demand, that some of the pupils and enrolled scholars were as young as sixteen. The staff at Marconi House 'worked to the limits of their power and to the last ounce of their energy to meet the great emergency'.

From marconiheritage .com

johnboy,

Here is a recruitment poster for trainee Marconi Wireless Operators, as per your information.

Regards,

LF

This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

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Lancashire Fusilier

Seems to contradict my post! ' Exemption from military service '

Johnboy,

Not when you read the small print, the exemption was conditional, text reads :-

YOUNG MEN

BETWEEN THE AGES OF 16 AND 18,

SERVE YOUR COUNTRY AS

WIRELESS OPERATORS

EXEMPTION FROM MILITARY SERVICE

Official Government Statement.

'Owing to the present urgent demand for Wireless Operators in the Mercantile Marine, students entering the school prior to their eighteenth birthdays, and making such progress that they are able to obtain the necessary certificates on or before reaching the age of 181/4, will be temporarily exempted from military service until a sufficient number of Operators has been obtained. This exemption continues so long as students of military age who have passed into the Mercantile Marine are employed as Operators at sea.'

Free Training. Good Pay. Permanent Positions.

Write or call for full particulars to

THE MARCONI REPRESENTATIVE

City School of Wireless Telegraphy, 4 Bridlesmith Gate, NOTTINGHAM.

Regards,

Regards,

LF

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Lancashire Fusilier
The A.C. ( Auto Carrier ) Armoured Car
In 1902, John Weller ( 28 November 1877 - 31 August 1966 ) along with his brother Harry, formed a Company in West Norwood, London. Their new Company ' Weller Brothers ', manufactured bicycles fitted with either their 1.75 hp or 2.25 hp petrol engines, these ' Weller ' bikes being an early form of motorcycle.
In 1903, Weller Brothers decided to expanded their business to include the manufacture of motorcars, however, their business partner and financial backer, John Portwine, a wealthy butcher, was opposed to the motorcar venture, as he considered their proposal to be financially risky, and instead, John Portwine persuaded the Weller Brothers to produce a much less expensive 3-wheeler delivery vehicle, and perhaps being a butcher, John Portwine could envisage the need for such a 3-wheeler delivery vehicle on the streets of London.
John and Harry Weller agreed, and in 1904 a new Company named Autocars and Accessories Ltd., was formed to produce the new ' Auto-Carrier ' 3-wheeler vehicle. This being the origins of what was to become one of the oldest independent car marques in Britain, the ' A.C. '.
The 5.6 hp 3-wheeler ' Auto-Carrier ' was an immediate success, and soon became a familiar sight on London streets with major Department Stores such as Maples and Dickens & Jones using a fleet of ' Auto-Carriers ' as delivery vehicles.
Following the financial success of their ' Auto-Carrier ' 3-wheeler, in 1907 the Weller Brothers were able to once again renew their interest in a motorcar project, which was to be a passenger version of the ' Auto-Carrier ' to be known as the ' Sociable ' for which, the cargo box on the front of the ' Auto-Carrier ' was replaced with a two passenger seats.
The ' Sociable ' 3-wheeler had a single rear wheel fitted with a chain-drive, and two front wheels.
In 1910, a fleet of 3-wheeler ' Auto-Carriers ' some capable of being fitted with Maxim machine guns, and others fitted out as Ammunition Carriers, were purchased by the Army for the 25th London Cyclist Regiment, making Auto-Carriers Ltd., one of the few vehicle manufacturers to provide the British Army with ' fighting vehicles ' before WW1.
With their continuing financial success, in 1911, Auto Carrier Ltd., were able to move to a new much larger factory, the Ferry Works at Thames Ditton, in Surrey, and in 1913, Auto-Carriers Ltd., produced their first 4-wheeler motorcar, a sporty two-seater with a rear axle mounted gearbox, this being the first motorcar to carry the iconic ' AC ' roundel radiator badge.
In 1914, following the outbreak of WW1, and no doubt following on from the success of the Army's Auto-Carrier 3-wheelers, their reliability, manoeuvrability and excellent performance, the War Office invited ' Auto- Carriers Ltd. ' to produce an experimental Light Armoured Car, and the ' A.C. Armoured Car ' will be featured in the upcoming posts over the next few days.
During WW1, Auto-Carrier's Ferry Works at Thames Ditton, in addition to producing motorcars, also manufactured shells and fuses for the war effort.
Attached is an early Weller Brothers' advertisement for their ' Weller Bike '.
LF
Graces Guide This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

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Lancashire Fusilier

The 1904 ' Auto-Carrier ' rear wheel chain-drive 3-wheeler.

LF

This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

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Lancashire Fusilier

A restored ' Auto-Carrier ' 3-wheeler delivery vehicle.

LF

This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

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LF,

I note with interest there will be an article on the "AC armoured car".

During my earlier research on WW1 armoured cars I gathered a bit of information on this one. I have plans from Military Modelling magazine plus some articles published in 1914 from the "Light Car" journal of the time. Also other articles written by other authors from the modelling fraternity.

I can reproduce them, however some are not too clear, being photocopies from photocopies.

Let me know if they may be useful.

On the subject of "useful", I am looking at doing a series of masters to complement models of "Narrow Gauge" equipment, starting with the Simplex 20HP.

I recently bought the excellent book "WDLR", by Roy C Link, this has a wealth of details and drawings of most of the narrow gauge equipment including rolling stock.

This book has scale drawings and photo's of the Dick, Kerr and British Westinghouse petrol electric loco's, however I am searching for any details of the drivers cab layout.

Through this excellent site I am now asking if anyone has any details that might help as to how the drivers cab was fitted out ?????

Any replies can be made via this site or at my email address, georgemoore66..........followed by @hotmail.co.uk.

Thanks in advance if you think you may be able to help.

George

[Modelmaker]

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Lancashire Fusilier

how the drivers cab was fitted out ?????

George,

I shall be posting several nice photographs of the ' A.C. Armoured Car ' over the next few days, and if after looking at them you have any others you would like to add, that would be most useful.

With regard to the Simplex, if you enter ' Simplex ' in this Thread's search box, you will bring up a lot of information and photographs on both the 20 hp and 40 hp.

I also have many other ' Simplex ' photographs I have not as yet posted here, including several with good views of the driver's cab layout and I shall gladly email them to you.

Regards,

LF

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Lancashire Fusilier

In 1910, a number of 3-wheeler ' Auto-Carriers ' some capable of being fitted with Maxim machine guns, and others fitted out as Ammunition Carriers, were purchased by the Army for the 25th ( County of London ) Cyclist Battalion, London Regiment, H.Q. Fulham, making Auto-Carriers Ltd., one of the few vehicle manufacturers to provide the British Army with ' fighting vehicles ' before WW1.

The first photograph, shows the 25th ( County of London ) Cyclist Battalion, London Regiment's ' Auto-Carrier ' Maxim machine gun carriers, for which the cargo-box normally fitted to the front of the 3-wheeler has been removed and replaced with a storage area for the Maxim machine gun, ammunition boxes and other supplies, this Auto-Carrier 3-wheeler carried the driver, and 2 machine gunners.

The Auto-Carriers ' LC 8934 ' number plate, is an early London North West registration.

LF

This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

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Lancashire Fusilier

A 25th ( County of London ) Cyclist Battalion, London Regiment's 3-wheeler ' Auto-Carriers ' Ammunition Carrier.


The rear wheel chain-drive Auto-Carriers ' LC 2667 ' number plate, is an early London North West registration.



LF




This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.


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Lancashire Fusilier

Although not too clear an image, this photograph does give a rare glimpse of the 3-wheeler ' Auto-Carrier ' machine gun carriers as used by the 25th ( County of London ) Cyclist Battalion, London Regiment.

LF

This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

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Lancashire Fusilier

The cap badge of the 25th ( County of London ) Cyclist Battalion, London Regiment, used from 1908, until the Regiment was disbanded in 1922.

Their motto ' Tenax et Audax ' translates as ' Tenacious and Bold '.

LF

IWM This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

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LF.....once again most helpful reply, thanks.

As regards the Simplex, I do have some excellent scale drawings of the 20 and 40HP types, plus there are preserved examples of both around the UK....

A contributor has been in touch with hopefully some more info on the petrol/electric loco's of Kerr Dick and British Westinghouse. I am after the drivers cab layout and details, in general most photographers in major conflicts only photo the outsides....no consideration for modelers...!

Mind you, a lot of museum staff can be awkward when they see (me) crawling under an exhibit.

Regards the AC, I may have got confused, I was referring to the small AC vehicles made by AC cars of Thames Ditton......they did not have a very long or distinguished career.....a small car with an overly large drum mounting a machine gun.

Sorry for any confusion.

George.

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Lancs,

Re #4867 'A restored Auto-Carrier', am pretty sure that this is the one displayed in the National Motorcycle Museum, Bickenhill, Birmingham. Also the home of the International Birmingham Arms Fair.

Regards,

Mike.

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