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Lancashire Fusilier

WW1 Military Motors - 1916 set x 50 cards

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Lancashire Fusilier

A nicely detailed photograph showing a WW1 Wireless Operator and their wireless equipment, this photograph is dated June 1917.

LF

IWM This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

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Lancashire Fusilier

Photographed sometime in 1917, ' Scalybacks ' in Salonika, are seen setting up their portable wireless transmitter.

LF

IWM This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

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Scalyback

Post 4801 that looks somewhat familiar! A timeless picture.

Post 4802 get a similar picture in Gaza and I will be happy.

53rd division signal company lives on as 53rd signal squadron. On of the few TF/TA/AR units that can claim a continuous link, the barracks marched out of on the 5th of August 1914 only moved permanently when the Millennium Stadium was built.

My unit was a satellite unit, with its own unique twist on history in another famous barracks ;)

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Lancashire Fusilier

Post 4802 get a similar picture in Gaza and I will be happy.

Scalyback,

Here is a photograph of a portable wireless transmitter, it's generator and extended mast aerial/antenna set up in Gaza, with a Squadron of Rolls-Royce Armoured Cars in the background.

LF

This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

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Lancashire Fusilier

A couple more ' Gaza ' wireless related photographs, the first photograph shows a Field Telephone in use during the Second Battle of Gaza, April 1917.

Just in view, is the back wheel of a ' Triumph ' motorcycle.

LF

IWM This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

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Lancashire Fusilier

A Signals/Communication Tent in Gaza.

LF

IWM This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

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Lancashire Fusilier

Before moving on, here are the remaining 4 photographs from the very nicely detailed series showing the Mark V Male Tank ' Devil ', which is currently on display at the Imperial War Museum in London.

LF

IWM This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

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Lancashire Fusilier

2

IWM This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

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Lancashire Fusilier

3

IWM This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

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Lancashire Fusilier

4

IWM This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

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Lancashire Fusilier

Staying with the ' Communications ' theme, here are two exceptionally nice hand-coloured technical drawings of a WW1 period Portable Transmitter Hand-cart, along with it's Power Supply Hand-cart, with both drawings being notated.


I was also fortunate, to have two photographs showing this portable transmitter equipment being used in training at the Royal Naval Training Establishment at Shotley during WW1.



The first post, shows the ' Portable Transmitter Hand-Cart ', which in addition to carrying the Transmitter, also carried the stowed steel tubing sections which when assembled formed the Transmitter's Mast.



LF





This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.


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Lancashire Fusilier

The Portable Transmitter's Power & Supplies Hand-Cart, carrying the Engine/Alternator, the Mast's fittings and a stowed tent for use by the Transmitter's crew.

LF

This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

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Lancashire Fusilier

Two very interesting photographs showing the Portable Transmitter Hand-Carts in actual use during WW1 at the Royal Naval Training Establishment Shotley, also known in the Royal Navy as ' HMS Ganges '.


The first photograph, shows both the Portable Transmitter Hand-Carts being prepared for use, and the second photograph shows the steel tubing sections which formed the Transmitter's Mast, being assembled.


RNTE Shotley was a naval training establishment at Shotley, near Ispwich in Suffolk, which opened 1905. RNTE Shotley trained boys for naval service until it closed in 1976.



LF





IWM This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.


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Lancashire Fusilier

In this photograph, we have a good view of the steel tubing sections being assembled to form the Transmitter's Mast, the mounted Transmitter's Engine & Alternator, and also the box containing the Mast's fittings.

LF

IWM This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

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Lancashire Fusilier

Interestingly, both the hand-cart's carriages had legs, so that when the hand-cart's wheels were removed while the Transmitter was operational ( as seen far left in the previous post ) the carriage's 4 legs held the equipment firmly on the ground, as also seen in the previous post.

LF

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Lancashire Fusilier
Mobile horse-drawn Wireless Transmitters were also used by the British Army from the start of WW1, those being the 1500-watt Marconi ' Spark ' Transmitters which were housed in a specially constructed horse-drawn wagon and accompanied by a second horse-drawn wagon which housed the Transmitter's power unit and other supplies. The 1500-watt Transmitter's power unit was a Marconi 1.5 kW ' Spark ' petrol-driven generator.

Those mobile horse-drawn 1500-watt Wireless Transmitters were each operated by an 8 man unit which took 20 minutes to prepare the Transmitter for operation, including erecting the Transmitters aerial, which consisted of a 525 foot long wire mounted on two 70 foot tubular steel masts.


The first two photographs, shows a 1500-watt Marconi ' Spark ' Transmitter in operation, with the Wireless Operator working from his position at the rear of the Transmitter Wagon.


LF




This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

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Lancashire Fusilier

A mobile horse-drawn 1500-watt Marconi ' Spark ' Wireless Transmitter in use.

LF

This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

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Lancashire Fusilier

The mobile horse-drawn 1500-watt Marconi ' Spark ' Wireless Transmitter and it's accompanying power unit were each carried in separate specially designed 2-wheeled wagons, and when the Transmitter was in use, both wagons were linked together and the power cable from the generator/alternator was attached to the Transmitter, as can be seen on the right-side of the wagon in the previous post.

In the following 3 photographs, we can see the separate wagons.

The first photograph, shows the rear view of the 1500-watt Marconi ' Spark ' Wireless Transmitter 2-wheeled wagon.

LF

This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

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Lancashire Fusilier

In this photograph, taken in Mesopotamia in 1917, the 2-wheeled 1500 watt Wireless Transmitter wagon has been detached from the power unit wagon.

Note the Transmitter's mast to the left, and also the fabric sun screen when has been erected over the Radio Operator's position at the rear of the Wireless Transmitter wagon.

LF

AWM This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

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Lancashire Fusilier

Again photographed in Mesopotamia in 1917, here is a side-view showing both the separate horse-drawn 2-wheeled Wireless Transmitter wagon and it's 2-wheeled power unit wagon joined together.

LF

IWM This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

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Rockdoc

Would this kind of thing have been what the War Diaries refer to as "Pack Wireless", LF?

Keith

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Lancashire Fusilier

Would this kind of thing have been what the War Diaries refer to as "Pack Wireless", LF?

Keith

Keith,

The ' Pack Wireless ' would have been the Marconi Wireless Transmitter plus it's Power Unit which were carried on a Pack Horse, the type as shown in the Salonika photo in post # 4802.

The equipment was mounted to tubular frames shaped to fit over the Pack Horse's back, and when removed from the Pack Horse, those same tubular frames acted as legged mounts to keep the equipment firmly on the ground, again as shown in post #4802.

You will also see in that Salonika photo, that the inside of the tubular frames were covered with thick padding to prevent any injury to the Pack Horse's back.

Here is a photograph of a ' Pack Wireless ' ( power unit ) mounted on the back of a Pack Horse, and tomorrow, I shall post a series of photographs showing the Marconi ' Pack Wireless ' in detail.

Regards,

LF

This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

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Lancashire Fusilier

Would this kind of thing have been what the War Diaries refer to as "Pack Wireless", LF?

Keith

Keith,

In advance to tomorrow's ' Pack Wireless ' photographs, here is a Marconi Pack Wireless being used by Australian Troops in 1913.

On the right, can be seen the tubular frame, shaped to fit over the Pack Horse's back, carrying the Wireless Transmitter's Power Unit, which is lined with thick padding to protect the Pack Horse's back, and having been removed from the Pack Horse, is now on the ground standing on the mount's legs.

The multi-part Transmitter Mast and the Marconi Wireless Transmitter, would also have been carried by Pack Horse.

Regards,

LF

AWM This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

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Rockdoc

Thanks, LF. I must have missed Post 4802. Although it isn't intended for a human rider, I'm pretty sure that the padding under the framework would have been called a pack-saddle. When we were in FYOM with the Salonika Campaign Society we saw a few donkeys that were fitted with a pack saddle, though they weren't as posh as the one in 4823. It made things more comfortable for the animal but also made it much easier to provide a secure fixing for the load.

Keith

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Lancashire Fusilier

When we were in FYOM with the Salonika Campaign Society we saw a few donkeys that were fitted with a pack saddle, though they weren't as posh as the one in 4823. It made things more comfortable for the animal but also made it much easier to provide a secure fixing for the load.

Keith,

The terrain in Salonika was probably well suited to the use of pack horses and mules, and here we see pack mules in Salonika being used as Vickers machine gun carriers, May 1916.

Regards,

LF

IWM This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

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