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bobloes

HMS St George

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bobloes

I am trying to find out where St George was during the period Jan to May 1906. I believe it was a boys training ship during this period and the Navy List book indicates that it carried out voyages to the Carribean and North America. Unfortunately the National Archives are not showing any Ships Log records after 1869. Is the late 19th century a period where lots of records were lost or am I just unlucky on this one? Is there any other way of finding out where it voyaged to? Thanks

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Sandie Hayes

Up to May 1906 HMS St George served as Boys Training Ship in 4th Cruiser Squadron. But after May 1906 she went into reserve at Devonport. In 1909 she was converted to a destroyer depot Ship at Chatham. and re commissioned as depot ship for the 3rd destroyer squadron at the Nore in March 1910. In June 1910 she suffered some damage after grounding off Sheerness. Served with 6th destroyer Flotilla 1912 - 1913 and then 9th Destroyer Flotilla 1913 - 1914. During the early months of world war one served as part of the Humber Patrol. In 1917 was converted to support submarines and went to the Aegean in 1918 - 1919 with the 2nd Submarine Flotilla. Paid off in 1920 and scrapped June 1920.

The St George was a steel copper sheathed first class cruiser of the Naval Defence Act Programme and was launched in 1892. She was built by contract at the yard of Messrs Earle at Hull and engined by Messrs Maudsley & Co. She was commissioned at Portsmouth in October 1894 as the flagship of the Commander in Chief on the Cape of Good Hope and West Africa Stations. She then carried the flag of Rear Admiral Harry H Rawson C.B.

The Edgar Class of Large Cruisers consisted of HMS Edgar, HMS Crescent, Endymion, Gibraltar, Grafton, Hawke, Royal Arthur, St George and HMS Theseus. Built between 1890 and 1892. These large Cruisers saw service in the Great War as converted depot ships for destroyers and Submarines. With One loss. HMS Hawke being Torpedoed and sunk by U- 9 on the 15th October 1914. with the loss of 524 men. (only 70 survivors.). Displacement: 7,700 tons. Horse power: 12,000. Length 360ft. Beam: 60' 8". Draught: 23' 9". Armament: two 22 ton guns. ( protected by steel shields) Speed:19.7 knots.



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Sandie Hayes

From www.woorldwar1.co.uk

HMS St George Built Earle, Hull, laid down April 1890, completed October 1894.

Size:

Length 360 feet pp 387 feet 6 inches overall, beam 60 feet, draught 23 feet 9 inches, displacement 7,350 tons load.

Propulsion:

2 shaft triple expansion engines, 12,000 ihp, 20 knots

Armour:

9in gun shields, 6-3in decks

Armament:

2 x 9.2in 30 cal (2 x 1), 10 x 6in Mk VII (10 x 1), 16 x 3pounder (16 x 1), 4 x 14in TT

Comments:

smaller versions of the previous Blake class (which didn't see service in WW1) although owing superior machinery matched them for speed and firepower although with less protection. Crescent and royal Arthur were built to a slightly modified design with a raised forecastle and a pair of 6 inch guns replacing the 9.2 inch gun and are sometimes considered a separate class. Crew 544.

World War 1 Service:

1914 Destroyer depot ship Humber.

1915 Destroyer depot ship Mediterranean.

1917 Submarine depot ship Aegean.

1920 Sold for scrap.

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bobloes

I found this on a website

HMS St. George (1894) CC (8th)

This the eighth ship to carry the name HMS St. George was a 1st Class, Protected Cruiser.

Built by Earle of Hull, laid down 23-Apr-1890, launched 23-Jun-1892, and completed 25-Oct-1894.

On completion served as Flagship on the Cape & West Africa Station 1894-98. Returned to the UK to reserve at Portsmouth 1898-99. Served with the Cruiser Squadron 1899-1902. Chatham 1902-04. Then the South Atlantic Station 1904.

On to the America & West Indies Station 1904-06 as Boys Training Ship. Then back to the UK and reserve at Devonport 1906-09.

Converted to a Destroyer Depot Ship at Chatham 1909-10 and served in this role at the Nore 1910-12, Firth of Forth 1913-14, Humber 1914-15 and Mediterranean 1915-17.

Converted to a Submarine Depot Ship 1917 and served in this role in the Aegean 1918-19.

Sold 01-Jul-1920.

Won the Battle Honour: Benin 1897.

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bobloes

I hit the wrong button on my last post. I found the last reference on this website.

http://www.britainsnavy.co.uk/Ships/HMS%20St%20George/HMS%20St%20George%20(1894)%20CC%208.htm

Does anybody's experience suggest that the ship would have plied back and forth across the Atlantic just for boy's training? Or exactly the opposite?

Does THE America & West Indies station have any significance?

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bobloes

I thought it might be useful to others to finish this off from my perspective.

In searching the National Archives I was too specific on the name. Searching in ADM53 under 'George' instead of 'St George' returned an answer re ship's logs. St George was a boys training ship and did ply the Carribean in the time that I was interested in.

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zipkruse

If anyone's still seeing this, I'd value guidance.

 

One of the last captains of the HMS St. George was Sidney Richard Olivier. I'm looking for a photograph of him, which I can't seem to find anywhere online.

 

Any recommendations? 

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seaJane

Not in the National Portrait Gallery, didn't (as far as I can make out from searching the alumni records online) go to Oxford or Cambridge so no use looking for a college photo, and I'm afraid the National Museum of the Royal Navy is not taking enquiries at the moment.

 

He seems to have played cricket for Hampshire in 1895 but I have no idea where you might go for team photos.

 

PS "HMS St George" or "the St George" please, but not both. Ta :)

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Malcolm12hl

Your man was born in Wilton, Wiltshire on 1 March 1870, the son of a clergyman, retired from the Royal Navy as a Captain in 1920, and died at Horton, near Wimborne, Dorset on 21 January 1932.  You might check the local press around the time of his death to see if there was an obituary or photograph.

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zipkruse

Thank you both kindly for the information about Capt. Olivier and HMS St. George.

 

I have, though Ancestry.com and other sources, managed to contact some of his ancestors who sadly know little of him. But they’re looking to see if they can find a photo.

 

You may be interested in why I am searching. This may sound ridiculous, but I bought Capt. Olivier’s ceremonial hat on eBay, and it hat no background other than his name (which has been misread as “JR Olivier” instead of “SR”. This led me to look him up, and even from here in California, it’s been a fun little research project for my kids and I. He was not a terribly distinguished officer, but was awarded several interesting commendations, even his the ship was mostly just a sub tender.

 

Kind regards and thanks again! 

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