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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Restoring Brodie helmet


spconnolly007
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After a major engagement, there must have been scores of them lying around all over the place, as you say, absolutely rank and yet the shell would remain re-serviceable.

David

David,

The British Army did salvage a Battlefield for equipment, including collecting helmets, as is evidenced by the attached photograph, which is captioned as " troops collecting items of kit, clothing and rifles which were strewn around after a battle at Bapaume, these items were salvaged from those who no longer needed them... the dead "

LF

post-63666-0-10102200-1385401143_thumb.j

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Absolutely. Spot-on photo.

David

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That's another one alright! To me it looks as though there might just be another letter just off to the upper left of the '0' - possibly a 'D' as per the other helmet posted about?

David

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  • 1 month later...

Hi All, I have an early magnetic raw edge brodie converted for civil defence use in the 1930's. I am about to restore it back to its former glory but I was wondering what your thoughts are on the bales, to me they don't look like first or second war?

post-37650-0-55918000-1388301819_thumb.jpost-37650-0-43971700-1388301837_thumb.j

Edited by bu6512
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Hi all I am looking to restore a US 1917. So what is the best color to use to paint it after its been stripped and the dents gently knocked back out? Also which would have been more widely used on the 1917's for texture Sand, Sawdust or Cork? I have recorked WW2 M1's before so I understand how to do that. This would be my first foray into a WW1 helmet.

Mack

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  • 3 years later...

Several years ago,  I purchased a Brodie Helmet with a Miris Logo and an LS - 18 stamp.

It includes the liner and leather chinstrap. Overall great condition.

Apparently, there has been some confusion over the LS stamp on Brodies.

 

Mine clearly has a Miris logo stamp, to the left of the LS 18.

In addition, it has the Red War Office stamp, inside the liner as well.

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  • 1 year later...

I have one too.! Magnetic Brodie MYЯRYS LS 18 With a thick coat of sand applied and green paint , the first coat of paint is grey.

length:305mm width:293,5 brim sides:50mm rear:40mm front:35mm 

Height:105mm

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On 29/12/2013 at 07:26, bu6512 said:

Hi All, I have an early magnetic raw edge brodie converted for civil defence use in the 1930's. I am about to restore it back to its former glory but I was wondering what your thoughts are on the bales, to me they don't look like first or second war?

post-37650-0-55918000-1388301819_thumb.jpost-37650-0-43971700-1388301837_thumb.j

Postwar

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There is another little clue, maybe worth some research.!

 

Thomas Henry Woollen was born in 1859 and received his technical education at Firth's College, Sheffield. 

He was apprenticed with Leadbeater and Scott, steel manufacturers, and subsequently remained with this firm on the commercial side for a number of years. 

After a period as Managing Director of The Jointless Rim Co., he was appointed General Manager of Clement Talbot Ltd. and Director of Palmer Tyres Ltd

During the war he was concerned with production at the Ministry of Munitions, and thereafter joined the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders Ltd. as Head of the Standards Department. 

One of his greatest services to the automobile industry was undoubtedly the establishment of rim standards for motor cars, motor cycles and pedal cycles, and of tyre valve standards for cars. He retired from active participation in the Industry in 1933. His interest in the Institution dates from its earliest history, since he was one of the founders of the original Cycle Engineers' Institute in Birmingham, and was President of that body for the session 1900/1901. On the establishment of the I.A.E. in London he became a Member of its first Council, and subsequently served thereon for upwards of 24 years. 

He died on 25th August, 1936, at the age of 77. 

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