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Help identifying a regiment


9th Black Watch
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Hi,

This photo turned up recently in York. It was taken at a studio in Northumberland Street, Newcastle. I'm no expert on cap badges and would value some second opinions.

My first guess was Connaught Rangers but I know several formations had similar badges.

Any help would be much appreciated.

Best wishes,

Derek

post-2-1090512221.jpg

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Looks like the Connaught Rangers to me. The Royal Irish had a smaller badge and the scrolls were of different shape. The other three Irish regiments that featured the harp were the 8th Irish Hussars, the Royal Irish Rifles and the London Irish. The Hussars and the Rifles both featured angels on the harps and the London Irish had nothing but a harp. Plus, brass buttons instead of black horn ones for a rifle regiment.

DrB

:)

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Cheers Guys,

My first instinct was Connaught Rangers mainly because of the shape and size of the harp and scroll. Thanks for confirming this.

All the best,

Derek

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A clear view for confirmation.

post-2-1090537211.jpg

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Thanks Desmond,

My next step's to try and identify him.

Best wishes,

Derek

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My guess is that he is a cadet as he is wearing a sam browne but no pips.

Tom

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I think it's a wonderful picture!

What about the 'ribbon' above his pocket .. if it is a ribbon?

Des

Just thought - could he be, as Tom says, a cadet ... but someone who has served as a ranker elsewhere and has recently been promoted and is undergoing training? Don't know if it worked that way so I'm guessing here!

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My guess is that he is a cadet as he is wearing a sam browne but no pips.

Didn't cadets wear a white band on the eppaulette? My guess is that he actually has been commissioned as an officer and is wearing a cuff-rank tunic. His "pips" would be on his cuff.

Dave.

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The detail on the original is a lttle clearer than the scan. He's definately wearing a star ribbon.

I'm not sure about the rank. Like Dave I guessed he was wearing a 'cuff-rank' tunic but I'm not sure.

Unfortunately there's no name on the reverse to help clarify this.

However I agree with Desmond - I think it's a really nice image. It's mounted in the original frame and now has a prominent place on the office wall.

Derek

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Interesting point made by Croonaert relating to the white band on the eppaulette.

Any more info on this please.

Kilty.

Thinking about it, I'm unsure whether this was appropriate to WW1, as the eppaulette white band was added in 1940 (ACI 661, dated June 29th 1940). Prior to (and as well as ) this, a 1.5 inch deep band of white cloth was worn around the headgear.

No matter what, the photo isn't of an officer cadet.

Dave.

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Might he be a WO1? Phil B

Not in that hat, Phil.

(A W.O.1 wouldn't be wearing an open neck tunic and tie either. It'd be a high collared, "officer standard" version of a OR tunic (with the possibility of "bellow" pockets)

Dave.

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Yes, I think you`re right, Croo. It`s just that in my time a WO1 could look very like an officer. It wasn`t a good idea to salute him, though! Phil B

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Was the 'style of wearing their hats in this semi-crumpled, rather 'dashing' fashion, something undteraken by all ranks of Connaught Rangers ? Se picture below!

post-2-1090754929.jpg

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I`ve been under the impression that the "floppy" hat was just the standard cap with the reinforcement removed, but this may not be the case. Are there any articles on WW1 caps? Phil B

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I`ve been under the impression that the "floppy" hat was just the standard cap with the reinforcement removed, but this may not be the case. Are there any articles on WW1 caps? Phil B

Phil.

Discounting the soft "Gorblimey" hats of 1915, a soft version of the SD cap began to appear in 1916.

See this article..."trenchcap"

(You might recognise the author!!!)

Dave.

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This photo turned up recently in York. It was taken at a studio in Northumberland Street, Newcastle.

Just a thought about the original photo. If it was taken in Newcastle, what's the chances that this officer is actually in the Tyneside Irish (24th -27th Northumberland Fusiliers), whose badge was identical to that of the Connaughts apart from the wording on the scroll?

Dave. <_<

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Dave,

I had a similar thought last night. Bearing in mind the origins of the photograph it makes sense. The detail on the original is quite clear. I'll try and enhance a picture of the badge and buttons.

I'll post the results later.

Once again I'd like to thank everyone for the advice, information, comments etc.

All the best,

Derek

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Just to illustrate Dave's point.

post-2-1090825294.jpg

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Good thinking, Batman, about the Tyneside Irish! I missed that one.

Thanks for the article, Joe. You deserve a BSc - bachelor of soft caps! Phil B

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