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paullucas01

Lithuanians sent from Scotland to Russia

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frances togneri

Paul

If you meet with Valdas, please give him my regards. Without his assistance I would never have resolved the Papilauskas/Papiliauskas issue and realised my family have been using the wrong name for more than a century! My elderly Papilauskas cousin was very amused when I told him!

I used a researcher and now know the location of my grandmother's home. The estate no longer exists but was named in her 'passport'. I just couldn't read the old Russian writing. I am trying once more to have a full translation made.

Enjoy

Frances

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dubs

Hi Frances, I am finding bits and pieces. When I was in Kaunas in October. I heard a story about "white" Lithuanians fighting "red" Lithuanians in Siberia. The "red" Lithuanians were from Scotland. I am trying to find more documentation on this when I get back at New Year. There is apparently a memorial in a church about this.

Paul, for some reason I haven't had any notifications of posts on this site so have missed all the latest activity. However, Frances emailed me and told me, so I have just had a read of it all. With reference to the White Lithuanians fighting the red Lithuanians in Siberia - my Mum was always told that her Grandpa went back to Siberia to fight with the 'Whites' against the 'Reds', although in this case it was always the 'White Russians' against the reds rather than the White Lithuanians...

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frances togneri

I have been to the Heritage Centre for North Lanarkshire and started a search of names. Much of what I saw refers to Lithuanians given assistance because they were unable to work due to illness or injury, or just didn't have a job. Addresses are given unless they lived outwith Bothwell parish but claiming in the parish. Some references give the date and reason for the ending of the financial assistance. By the end of 1919 and into 1920 there were references to people who were being given assistance 'until her husband returns home'. and a few where the woman had returned to Lithuania. I need to work further into 1920 - I reached March and was given 'subtle' hints about the time! In this category I found non-Lithuanian names so I am unsure of the situation there. I noted them but there was no clarification regarding where the husband might be.

I also need to work through the actual applications for details and background to the claimants. These documents are sensitive and protected by the Data Protection Act so I will not be able to publish the details online once I have the information. I will be in France for two months then in Aberdeen so it will be some time before I can arrange this.

In the meantime, I will transcribe what I have to date and make names available.

I tasked a friend to search microfiche copies of the Bellshill Speaker for references to the men leaving Scotland but so far nothing of interest.

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frances togneri

Has anyone come across the the following?

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02619288.1982.9974514

The Anglo‐Russian military convention and the Lithuanian imigrant community in lanarkshire,Scotland, 1914–20

This paper describes for the first time in any detail the implementation of the Anglo‐Russian Military Convention of 1917, a measure designed specifically to deal with the problem of Russian Jewish opposition to military service. Special attention is given to the impact of the Military Convention on a non‐Jewish section of the Russian immigrant population: the Lithuanian(Catholic) immigrants of Lanarkshire, Scotland. The role of the government and the police is critically examined and, using previously unpublished Home Office records, it is argued that the treatment of the Lithuanians was determined by factors external to the immigrant community. The paper challenges the view that the state in Britain has been the protector and guarantor of minority rights.

There are only extracts given online and the download cost seems high but there may be another way to get these books/articles if they look worthwhile. To find the pages, look for a square composed of dots on the Google Home page (top right), click to open, click on the More option, click on Even more from Google. Scroll down the page to the Specialised Search option and click on Scholar. Then search your topic.

Apologies if you know all this.

Frances

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paullucas01

Vaitkevičius, B. Iš Škotijos lietuvių kovų už tarybų valdžią Sibire, (L. K. P. istorijos klausimais, III t., Vilnius 1963).

Going back to the original purpose of tis thread. I am trying to get a copy of this academic paper - roughly translated as "Scottish Lithuanian struggle for power in the Soviet Siberia"

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Guest carla13

Hi all, im looking at this thread and wondering where you are all at? My great grandfather stasai belekiawicze was also sent back. Never heard from him again. I have spoken with apul lucas previously. Just wondered if anyone had found any new info?

Carla

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Guest carla13

Just want to add im in Clydebank and able to get to glasgow and lanarkshire with ease if i can help .

Carla

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frances togneri

Hi Carla

We all ran out of steam on this topic when new information failed to turn up. We no longer receive reminders when a new post is made and it is just by chance I happened to check the forum today.

If you have relayed all this to Paul he will have told you as much as I can. There is only one way to find what you are looking for and that is to check the poor records for wherever the family lived at this time. There is a good chance your gg grandmother claimed money from the parish. Be aware though that not all the records still exist, or if they do, can't be located. I checked Bothwell parish recently for Paul but only one book was available. I was contacted a few months ago by someone who said he could help me but despite subsequent emails to him I heard nothing further. Unfortunately I am in Lockerbie or I could have met with you.

Frances

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paullucas01

Hi, I have not progressed any further lately. I have visited the National Archives in Kew and found one letter only. I need to spend some time in the Scottish Archives and Lirbaries but I live in Wiltshire now. I have the articles mentioned earlier by Jim White however due to copyright issues I do not want to post these online.

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frances togneri

Hi

Regarding Scottish archives, I have a contact at North Lanarkshire Heritage Centre who will remember the records I was checking. She was unable to find the previous records covering the period 1918 - 1919 for Bothwell. I have not looked for other parish records. I am in Aberdeen before Christmas and will also be away from mid-January until the end of March, so I can only visit in the first two weeks of January or from April.

Frances

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wolf1

Frances , my grandfather fought at archangel and was evacuated by the british army to scotland , your research is extremly good and read your forums on here and other sites i can dot some of your i , s and stroke some of your t, s , ie your missing bits particullary a piece in your own family research , pm for knowledge

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TeevanTree

All

My name is also Frances, so I'm sure that won't get confusing at all(!)

I am chipping away at the brick wall and right now am basically researching anyone of sufficiently similar names to my family's, to see where Scottish transcriptions have been the root of the problem.

Here's the story of my family. Names are obviously up for debate!!

My great-grandmother was Magdalena Jewarauskiute (Jevarauskiute?), born December 1882 in Lithuania. No idea where except she used to wash her hair in a river (yep, there are loads).

Her parents were Antonas Jewarauskas and Wikorija Mazejiute (both died between 1912 and 1919). Oddly, Wikorija's name is mixed up in all Magdalena's Scottish certificates so that her first name is her second name and vice versa.

Magdalena left Lithuania with her two brothers (names unknown) to travel to America. When they were somewhere in Eurpoe (possibly Rotterdam I was told), they were struggling to get the fare for all three of them, so the brothers told Magdalena they'd go ahead first and send for her. She never heard from them again. She eventually got enough money together for the passage, and boarded a ship to America. As I think is getting to be more well known now, it was pretty common for the ships to let their Lithuanian passengers off in the UK and tell them they'd arrived in America. That's what happened to Magdalena. She worked somewhere (Ayrshire possibly) for a bit then arrived in Bellshill.

I have tried every possible incarnation of 1911 census searching and cannot for the life of me find her anywhere.

On 20 Jan 1912 Magdalena married Josas Paplauskas (born c.1882 Lithuania) in St Bride's, Bothwell. Josas' parents were [ib?]ineas Paplauskas (certificates not legible, by deduction maybe Vincas?) and Marie Cinikute.

Magdalena and Josas had three children in Bellshill - Albenia (1913-2006, married John Murphy), Adelia (1915-1916) and my gran Anele (1917-1998, married John Teevan).

Josas' youngest daughter Anele was born on 18 February 1917. Our whole family believed until I checked dates, that he had been conscripted back to Russia before she was born, but clearly it was a few months later. Magdalena was told he died before fighting (either at a rail station or a port), and so the story goes, she didn't get any widow's pension.

On 23 August 1919 Magdalena married a widower - a marriage of convenience of course - Tomoszas Strogaitis, born 1975 Lithuania to Euzus Strogaitis and Mare Saukizicute (first wife Agota Kasparckute). They both had their own children when they married, and then had a few more. He was not a nice man and she eventually lived with the Teevan's in later life, but went back to nurse Mr Strogaitis when he was dying (they were only sort of separated, not divorced).

The Strogaitis family called themselves Smith. One of the Strogaitis family married into the Belkiawicus family, who took the name Dobbs.

I have no-one left in my family to ask anything of. However I have a couple of photos and momentos, including:

(a) One of two men who I'd have thought were the two brothers, but I'd swear it was a Bellshill style studio photo on the same cardboard backing that I have for Magdalena's wedding photo;

(B) One of a small blonde boy in Lithuania (he's the same height as the greyhound next to him!) - very cute photo and clearly showing deprivation but I'll never be able to ID him - it's on a carte postale from Lithuania (no handwriting);

© A (rare I believe) death photo of a Lithuanian woman laid out with eyes open (I didn't realise it was a death photo till my aunt - now gone - told me). Again this was on a carte postale (same type as before). It does have handwriting on the back, which is in Lithuanian and which I've translated as something like "in memory of my sister Agota Gurnevic[ior], 33.IX.4d, Graziskai". In other words, this Agota was someone's sister and died in 1933 in Graziskai.

I would love to piece together some of the puzzles here, there are so many of them:

1. Where did my Paplauskas and Jevarauskas families come from? Maybe Graziskai - and I'll work out how to follow that up - but that might be a red herring.

2. Where was Magdalena in 1911? She should have been in Scotland as she was married in Jan 1912. All the wildcard searches in the world have turned up nothing.

3. Who are the two men in the photo? I see some resemblances to Josas so perhaps his family - I don't know after all anything about the Paplauskas line since he died so early on.

4. What happened to Magdalena's two brothers?

5. How and when and where did Josas die? There must have been specific trains etc out there during those couple of months so hopefully I can pinpoint that - mind you, it's been so hard finding anything out about the Convention.

6. Who is Agota?

7. Who is the little boy?

So many questions and so little likelihood of answers... it's been driving me up the wall so all and any thoughts are welcome! Well done everyone by the way, it's by far the most useful I've come across in 10+ years of research.

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TeevanTree

Oh and by the way I've been trawling old Lanarkshire papers (the online ones).

When the news of the conscription originally broke, the papers tended to think it would affect the "Russian Jews" in other parts of Scotland more than the "Catholic Poles" in Lanarkshire, because the latter were generally miners and of course, miners were pretty much exempt from fighting (none of my "Scottish" family went off to war because mining was so critical to the cause).

The official name for the relevant UK legislation is the Military Service (Convention with Allied States) Act 1917 - in case that helps with Googling etc.

In terms of dates:

July 1917 - The legislation was passed.

August 1917 - They had to register with the Local Constabulary and Burgh Police Forces in Lanarkshire. Apparently this was a bit of a shambles because of the vast numbers involved.

19 Oct 1917 - This was the week they left (maybe the first wave, if there was more than one - but I don't think there was). There was an influx of applications for poor law relief at Hamilton Parish Council by dependants of "Polish" miners who "have left to join their native country" - about 50 applied on 19 Oct and it hit the press, so maybe something to follow up on.

Amazingly it only seemed to cross everyone's mind that there would be a financial burden heavier on a couple of particular parts of the country, once the men had actually signed up. So there was a lot of to-ing and fro-ing between the local and central governments and the Russian government, with dependants basically looked after for a little while but relief ending in September 1919.

A couple of other interesting tidbits.

There was a case brought against Yonas Salavicius of Carfin for registering but not going. Let's face it, by the time he went to court the whole point of sending the Russians back had ended. So he only got a £2 fine or alternatively 10 days in jail.

During all the chaos a couple of Lithuanians (from Glasgow I think) did a brilliant thing. They took the Convention to the Court of Session, claiming it was breaching an earlier treaty not to conscript Russians. It ultimately failed on a point of law but good try - and probably saved their lives.

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wolf1

All

My name is also Frances, so I'm sure that won't get confusing at all(!)

I am chipping away at the brick wall and right now am basically researching anyone of sufficiently similar names to my family's, to see where Scottish transcriptions have been the root of the problem.

Here's the story of my family. Names are obviously up for debate!!

My great-grandmother was Magdalena Jewarauskiute (Jevarauskiute?), born December 1882 in Lithuania. No idea where except she used to wash her hair in a river (yep, there are loads).

Her parents were Antonas Jewarauskas and Wikorija Mazejiute (both died between 1912 and 1919). Oddly, Wikorija's name is mixed up in all Magdalena's Scottish certificates so that her first name is her second name and vice versa.

Magdalena left Lithuania with her two brothers (names unknown) to travel to America. When they were somewhere in Eurpoe (possibly Rotterdam I was told), they were struggling to get the fare for all three of them, so the brothers told Magdalena they'd go ahead first and send for her. She never heard from them again. She eventually got enough money together for the passage, and boarded a ship to America. As I think is getting to be more well known now, it was pretty common for the ships to let their Lithuanian passengers off in the UK and tell them they'd arrived in America. That's what happened to Magdalena. She worked somewhere (Ayrshire possibly) for a bit then arrived in Bellshill.

I have tried every possible incarnation of 1911 census searching and cannot for the life of me find her anywhere.

On 20 Jan 1912 Magdalena married Josas Paplauskas (born c.1882 Lithuania) in St Bride's, Bothwell. Josas' parents were [ib?]ineas Paplauskas (certificates not legible, by deduction maybe Vincas?) and Marie Cinikute.

Magdalena and Josas had three children in Bellshill - Albenia (1913-2006, married John Murphy), Adelia (1915-1916) and my gran Anele (1917-1998, married John Teevan).

Josas' youngest daughter Anele was born on 18 February 1917. Our whole family believed until I checked dates, that he had been conscripted back to Russia before she was born, but clearly it was a few months later. Magdalena was told he died before fighting (either at a rail station or a port), and so the story goes, she didn't get any widow's pension.

On 23 August 1919 Magdalena married a widower - a marriage of convenience of course - Tomoszas Strogaitis, born 1975 Lithuania to Euzus Strogaitis and Mare Saukizicute (first wife Agota Kasparckute). They both had their own children when they married, and then had a few more. He was not a nice man and she eventually lived with the Teevan's in later life, but went back to nurse Mr Strogaitis when he was dying (they were only sort of separated, not divorced).

The Strogaitis family called themselves Smith. One of the Strogaitis family married into the Belkiawicus family, who took the name Dobbs.

I have no-one left in my family to ask anything of. However I have a couple of photos and momentos, including:

(a) One of two men who I'd have thought were the two brothers, but I'd swear it was a Bellshill style studio photo on the same cardboard backing that I have for Magdalena's wedding photo;

( B) One of a small blonde boy in Lithuania (he's the same height as the greyhound next to him!) - very cute photo and clearly showing deprivation but I'll never be able to ID him - it's on a carte postale from Lithuania (no handwriting);

© A (rare I believe) death photo of a Lithuanian woman laid out with eyes open (I didn't realise it was a death photo till my aunt - now gone - told me). Again this was on a carte postale (same type as before). It does have handwriting on the back, which is in Lithuanian and which I've translated as something like "in memory of my sister Agota Gurnevic[ior], 33.IX.4d, Graziskai". In other words, this Agota was someone's sister and died in 1933 in Graziskai.

I would love to piece together some of the puzzles here, there are so many of them:

1. Where did my Paplauskas and Jevarauskas families come from? Maybe Graziskai - and I'll work out how to follow that up - but that might be a red herring.

2. Where was Magdalena in 1911? She should have been in Scotland as she was married in Jan 1912. All the wildcard searches in the world have turned up nothing.

3. Who are the two men in the photo? I see some resemblances to Josas so perhaps his family - I don't know after all anything about the Paplauskas line since he died so early on.

4. What happened to Magdalena's two brothers?

5. How and when and where did Josas die? There must have been specific trains etc out there during those couple of months so hopefully I can pinpoint that - mind you, it's been so hard finding anything out about the Convention.

6. Who is Agota?

7. Who is the little boy?

So many questions and so little likelihood of answers... it's been driving me up the wall so all and any thoughts are welcome! Well done everyone by the way, it's by far the most useful I've come across in 10+ years of research.

i can tell you that the Bothwell Papaluskas (Teevan , smith ) are not related to mossend Papaluskas(miller) and the other mossend Papaluskas (who also called themselves Miller)and they are also not related to each other from extensive research of births deaths marriages, war records etc

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TeevanTree

There are Miller witnesses at weddings of "Bothwell" ones. (Not really Bothwell BTW. Viewpark/Bellshill.) I know that says little since there are so many Miller's, of course. I'm not ruling out cousins till I know another generation back from what we can ascertain for both lines in Scotland.

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TeevanTree

Also just to help anyone who doesn't know this - I know many of you will - two of the main miners' rows were Bothwellpark and Muirpark. Bothwellpark isn't in Bothwell (though once upon a time in that Parish I suppose). It's at the boundary of Uddingston and Viewpark, around Bothwellpark Cemetery. Muirpark Rows were at Old Edinburgh Road, Viewpark. The two rows are literally about 2 - 5 mins walk from each other.

To help picture it: Go North from Bothwell and you hit Uddingston; North from Uddingston is Viewpark; and East from Viewpark is Bellshill. None of these villages is huge (Bothwell and Uddingston together have about 6000 people now I think but there are lots of houses and flats nowadays. Viewpark's address is Viewpark, Uddingston.)

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Tom Lang

There are Miller witnesses at weddings of "Bothwell" ones. (Not really Bothwell BTW. Viewpark/Bellshill.) I know that says little since there are so many Miller's, of course. I'm not ruling out cousins till I know another generation back from what we can ascertain for both lines in Scotland.

Also just to help anyone who doesn't know this - I know many of you will - two of the main miners' rows were Bothwellpark and Muirpark. Bothwellpark isn't in Bothwell (though once upon a time in that Parish I suppose). It's at the boundary of Uddingston and Viewpark, around Bothwellpark Cemetery. Muirpark Rows were at Old Edinburgh Road, Viewpark. The two rows are literally about 2 - 5 mins walk from each other.

To help picture it: Go North from Bothwell and you hit Uddingston; North from Uddingston is Viewpark; and East from Viewpark is Bellshill. None of these villages is huge (Bothwell and Uddingston together have about 6000 people now I think but there are lots of houses and flats nowadays. Viewpark's address is Viewpark, Uddingston.)

The National Library of Scotland (in Edinburgh) have a great resource of old Scottish maps.

Using these, I combined a side-by-side map with a 1944-50 Air Photo to show the Bothwell area.

In earlier times, Scottish records always referred to the Parish or District.

This is confusing now, as the small village of Bothwell (as an example) is now swamped by many surrounding towns and villages - but they all remain within The Parish of Bothwell for records purposes.

Hope this helps.

http://maps.nls.uk/geo/explore/sidebyside.cfm#zoom=14&lat=55.8079&lon=-4.0608&layers=9&right=BingHyb

I have also attached a Parish Map of the County of Lanark.

Kindest Regards,

Tom Lang.

post-87018-0-61036500-1440016561_thumb.j

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frances togneri

Hi to all

I have not visited this forum for some time because the participants (myself included) were unable to proceed further with the original discussion.  However, I note you are discussing some points I have already experienced.

 

First: Regarding the Paplauckas name variations and in particular Magdalena.  I found her marriage certificate early in my seach and quickly found she is not connected to my family, according to someone (originally) of that name I traced in Bothwell. His family had lived in the area of Mariampole, once part of the oblast of Suwalki, from where most of the Scottish Lithuanians seem to have come from.  I may have seen the gravestone for the children mentioned.  Unfortunately I now have only one copy of my correspondence and the names of his ancestors are not mentioned.  However, the Paplauckas stone is in Bothwell Park Cemetery, just the Bellshill side of Viewpark.  It is easy to spot and not far into the graveyard, sort of central.  I have been told Paplauckas is a separate name from that of my own family.  My family name is Papilauskas, although I recently discovered this is an error carried forward from their time in Lithuania.  Interestingly, it was only by finding a birth entry for another family member and advice from people who know about these names, I discovered the family name was originally Papiliauskas (only one additional letter!), and through this discovery I have documents for people who are probably my ancestors.  Unfortunaly there are gaps in the records available so I can't confirm this.  I am fortunate this is a rare name in Lithuania.

 

Second - Miller: How nice it would be to find connections here!  Unfortunately, Miller was one of the most common names adopted by Lithuanians.  The person mentioned above from the Paplauckas family is named Miller.  My own family took this name because my gran had a child with a Joseph Miller who I have been unable to trace but who I suspect appears in the 1911 census in Edinburgh as part of a 'Russian' family.  I think he may have been a lodger while my grandfather was fighting in Russia 1917 - 1919.  My uncles and mother took his name.  I don't know where his family found the name.

 

I had an email from Frances Tevan and I made several attempts to respond but the 'Teevan Tree' email address informed me my email would be forwarded.  I didn't hear anything after that.  Not sure if the email actually went anywhere.

 

Finally: Neither I nor Paul Lucas were able to find the names of the men who went to Russia in 1917 and North Lanarkshire Archives could not locate forther parish records for me.  I was only looking at the parish of Bothwellhaugh which took the biggest hit for poor relief, so I had some names from Uddingston and Bothwell.  The parish is now under water in Strathclyde Park.

 

Frances

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mysie

Is there not a big Lithuanian club in Mossend. My husband was sure he saw one there a few years ago.

 

                                                                    Mary.

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frances togneri

Hi

Yes and No!  There was a club, very well used by Lithuanians from miles around.  I have photos of my parents attending dances there and I vaguely remember being taken to some dances when children were allowed to attend.  These were very busy events and I remember a number of children there, though I did not know any so they could not have been at my school.  In my teens I began to realise I had this Lithuanian link and asked more questions.  I didn't know any others at secordary school (Bellshill Academy) who had a Lithuanian name although one boy in my class listened to me telling a friend that my gran had been telling me where she was from and told me his family was Lithuanian but had changed their name.  They chose Malone simply because they liked the sound on the name when they heard it!  He didn't know much about his family's past. This would be the early part of the 1970s so even then the Lithuanians were becoming well integrated into the local community.  I remember my mother stopped attending the dances and I think this was the point when the older Lithuanians became infirm or died.

 

Two years ago I was in contact with a professor from Kaunas university.  His speciality was the diaspora of the Lithuanian people.  He was in Glasgow for a week and I managed to meet him.  As I had little knowledge of the Mossend Lithuanians I contacted the priest at the Holy Family Church, Mossend, and was given a contact who knew the history.  We visited the church at the priest's invitation to see the portrait of the Black Madonna and the stained glass window commissioned to remember the Lithuanian population.  Worth a visit if you are in the area.  The old club, 'the tin hut', used to be located on the corner opposite the church but is long since gone.  The replacement social club, about 300 yards away, could not survive as a Lithuanian club after most of the original people had died but it is still in use and managed by the sons of one of the original members. Most of the original photos and other items have been lost.

 

Many of today's Lithuanian descendents do not know about their past.  Sad.

 

Frances

Edited by frances togneri

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On 06/10/2012 at 23:41, silvestris said:

This is really great information. My great-grandfather (Kazimiras Kisielius) must have been one of the ones who did not remain in Archangel. He wasn't allowed back to Scotland after the war. My great-grandmother and their infant son eventually left Glasgow and they reunited in Lithuania (Kaunas, I believe). My grandmother was born there soon after.

I would really love to know what happened to him from late 1917 to 1920. Do you think those who left Archangel would have gone to join the Tsar's White Army? Or might they have joined the Bolshevik Red Army? There were a lot of socialists in Lithuanian community in Glasgow (being that they were largely exploited miners!). My great-aunt recently told me that several of my great-grand-uncles fled to the United States in 1917 "because they didn't want to fight against their brothers". I suspect that she might be translating it as "brothers" but actually they didn't want to fight against their "comrades". If they were sympathetic to the Bolsheviks, they certainly wouldn't want to go join the White Army. Do you think this is possible? I'm not sure why they wouldn't have chosen to go to the Western Front instead though (other than just trying to avoid fighting altogether, of course!). Any suggestions for how I might confirm this?

Perhaps those of us who are in Scotland (I'm in Edinburgh) should get together to compare notes. Maybe we can come up with a plan for tracking down some of this information.

Silvestris the expression of fighting “against their own brothers” was not a new one at the time and was also used later during WWI. 

Lithuania being at an historically inconvenient junction it’s men were often conscripted into the forces they had no desire to support. There were Lithuanians in German army during WWI because some got caught up escaping the Russian invasions. There were also Lithuanians in the Russian army. Thus fighting on the British or the Russian side would have meant literally fighting against your brothers (or relatives). 

The same happened during WWII. 

There is some information about this in an article here:

http://www.draugas.org/news/the-great-war-in-lithuania-1914-1918/

 

Furthermore the word in comrade is barely ever used by Lithuanians even socialists used the word friend (draugas). Brother on the other hand is either a strong term of endearment or actually meaning some sort of relation or strong bond equal to brotherhood. 

 

If you need more information please get in touch. I am bilingual. Travel to Lithuania frequently and have friends in archives. 

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Hello to all on this forum!

 

My name is Skirmante Cairns. I was actually born in Lithuanian SSR. I am bilingual and have a MA Literature degree. I have been Interpreter, Translator and researcher by trade for a few years now. The topic of Lithuanians in Scotland is of great interest to me. I presently live in Southend-on-Sea in Essex and ideally would like to come and meet some of you amazing people in Scotland have a chat, conduct interviews if possible, acquire new friends.  

 

Essentially as I have already been doing on other topics in relation to Lithuanian heritage I collect stories. Will I ever write something about it? Maybe. But I will most certainly make the information accessible regardless. 

 

I have a very wide network of connections in Lithuania amongst historians and archivers thus if I can help I will. Also being bilingual I can help you with understanding things that are available only in Lithuanian. 

 

Please feel fee free to message me if you wish. I want these stories collected so that they don’t get lost in personal archives. Lithuania is small. The history of its people was rewritten many times. If I can reduce the chances of this story being forgotten I will. 

Sincerely,

Skirmante Cairns

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frances togneri

Hi Skirmante

I am the only person in Scotland, to my knowledge.  Since my last message here, I have had my DNA tested and found a little more information on Lithuanian relatives/ancestors.  I found a 2nd cousin (died last year, sadly) in Carfin who was able to fill in a few gaps from what he remembered about his father's and my grandfather's time in Russia.  I traced a living member of his family in Virbalis and, with help from a local person, was able to add her family into my tree.  I also found the location of my grandmother's estate, though there is only a small farmhouse there now and no roads - only tracks.  I think my grandfather was from Kybartai and I think I have a death record for his mother.  All a bit uncertain with no way to verify!  I would be pleased to discuss further.  frances.togneri@gmail.com  

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Tuinkol
On 05/08/2015 at 01:01, TeevanTree said:

All

My name is also Frances, so I'm sure that won't get confusing at all(!)

I am chipping away at the brick wall and right now am basically researching anyone of sufficiently similar names to my family's, to see where Scottish transcriptions have been the root of the problem.

Here's the story of my family. Names are obviously up for debate!!

My great-grandmother was Magdalena Jewarauskiute (Jevarauskiute?), born December 1882 in Lithuania. No idea where except she used to wash her hair in a river (yep, there are loads).

Her parents were Antonas Jewarauskas and Wikorija Mazejiute (both died between 1912 and 1919). Oddly, Wikorija's name is mixed up in all Magdalena's Scottish certificates so that her first name is her second name and vice versa.

Magdalena left Lithuania with her two brothers (names unknown) to travel to America. When they were somewhere in Eurpoe (possibly Rotterdam I was told), they were struggling to get the fare for all three of them, so the brothers told Magdalena they'd go ahead first and send for her. She never heard from them again. She eventually got enough money together for the passage, and boarded a ship to America. As I think is getting to be more well known now, it was pretty common for the ships to let their Lithuanian passengers off in the UK and tell them they'd arrived in America. That's what happened to Magdalena. She worked somewhere (Ayrshire possibly) for a bit then arrived in Bellshill.

I have tried every possible incarnation of 1911 census searching and cannot for the life of me find her anywhere.

On 20 Jan 1912 Magdalena married Josas Paplauskas (born c.1882 Lithuania) in St Bride's, Bothwell. Josas' parents were [ib?]ineas Paplauskas (certificates not legible, by deduction maybe Vincas?) and Marie Cinikute.

Magdalena and Josas had three children in Bellshill - Albenia (1913-2006, married John Murphy), Adelia (1915-1916) and my gran Anele (1917-1998, married John Teevan).

Josas' youngest daughter Anele was born on 18 February 1917. Our whole family believed until I checked dates, that he had been conscripted back to Russia before she was born, but clearly it was a few months later. Magdalena was told he died before fighting (either at a rail station or a port), and so the story goes, she didn't get any widow's pension.

On 23 August 1919 Magdalena married a widower - a marriage of convenience of course - Tomoszas Strogaitis, born 1975 Lithuania to Euzus Strogaitis and Mare Saukizicute (first wife Agota Kasparckute). They both had their own children when they married, and then had a few more. He was not a nice man and she eventually lived with the Teevan's in later life, but went back to nurse Mr Strogaitis when he was dying (they were only sort of separated, not divorced).

The Strogaitis family called themselves Smith. One of the Strogaitis family married into the Belkiawicus family, who took the name Dobbs.

I have no-one left in my family to ask anything of. However I have a couple of photos and momentos, including:

(a) One of two men who I'd have thought were the two brothers, but I'd swear it was a Bellshill style studio photo on the same cardboard backing that I have for Magdalena's wedding photo;

(B) One of a small blonde boy in Lithuania (he's the same height as the greyhound next to him!) - very cute photo and clearly showing deprivation but I'll never be able to ID him - it's on a carte postale from Lithuania (no handwriting);

© A (rare I believe) death photo of a Lithuanian woman laid out with eyes open (I didn't realise it was a death photo till my aunt - now gone - told me). Again this was on a carte postale (same type as before). It does have handwriting on the back, which is in Lithuanian and which I've translated as something like "in memory of my sister Agota Gurnevic[ior], 33.IX.4d, Graziskai". In other words, this Agota was someone's sister and died in 1933 in Graziskai.

I would love to piece together some of the puzzles here, there are so many of them:

1. Where did my Paplauskas and Jevarauskas families come from? Maybe Graziskai - and I'll work out how to follow that up - but that might be a red herring.

2. Where was Magdalena in 1911? She should have been in Scotland as she was married in Jan 1912. All the wildcard searches in the world have turned up nothing.

3. Who are the two men in the photo? I see some resemblances to Josas so perhaps his family - I don't know after all anything about the Paplauskas line since he died so early on.

4. What happened to Magdalena's two brothers?

5. How and when and where did Josas die? There must have been specific trains etc out there during those couple of months so hopefully I can pinpoint that - mind you, it's been so hard finding anything out about the Convention.

6. Who is Agota?

7. Who is the little boy?

So many questions and so little likelihood of answers... it's been driving me up the wall so all and any thoughts are welcome! Well done everyone by the way, it's by far the most useful I've come across in 10+ years of research.

Hello

 

I am the granddaughter of Urszule (Grace) Belkiawicus (step sister to Beanie and Nelly Smith). My mother is (Mare Belkiawicus (Dobbs)). She remembers Magdalena (Granny Smith) and Tomoszas (Granda Smith) but can't recall first wife Agota and her memory is failing . I may have the birth certificate for my Nanny - attic search! Magdalena and Tomoszas had a daughter together - my (great) Aunt Sarah who was a nun. I have a vague recollection of an uncle Johnny too.

 

Kim

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