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Remembered Today:

Lithuanians sent from Scotland to Russia


paullucas01

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Hi Kim,

TeevanTree/Frances hasn't been on the board since august 2015 I'm afraid.

But I've sent her a PM to advise that there has been a reply to the message.

I sincerely hope that PM reaches its destination, and that you two can connect and swap family-stories!

 

This whole thread has been an eye-opener for me. Never knew of any link between Lithuania and Scotland, but I know now!

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  • 1 year later...
On 06/10/2012 at 23:41, silvestris said:

This is really great information. My great-grandfather (Kazimiras Kisielius) must have been one of the ones who did not remain in Archangel. He wasn't allowed back to Scotland after the war. My great-grandmother and their infant son eventually left Glasgow and they reunited in Lithuania (Kaunas, I believe). My grandmother was born there soon after.

I would really love to know what happened to him from late 1917 to 1920. Do you think those who left Archangel would have gone to join the Tsar's White Army? Or might they have joined the Bolshevik Red Army? There were a lot of socialists in Lithuanian community in Glasgow (being that they were largely exploited miners!). My great-aunt recently told me that several of my great-grand-uncles fled to the United States in 1917 "because they didn't want to fight against their brothers". I suspect that she might be translating it as "brothers" but actually they didn't want to fight against their "comrades". If they were sympathetic to the Bolsheviks, they certainly wouldn't want to go join the White Army. Do you think this is possible? I'm not sure why they wouldn't have chosen to go to the Western Front instead though (other than just trying to avoid fighting altogether, of course!). Any suggestions for how I might confirm this?

Perhaps those of us who are in Scotland (I'm in Edinburgh) should get together to compare notes. Maybe we can come up with a plan for tracking down some of this information.

 

On 06/10/2012 at 23:41, silvestris said:

This is really great information. My great-grandfather (Kazimiras Kisielius) must have been one of the ones who did not remain in Archangel. He wasn't allowed back to Scotland after the war. My great-grandmother and their infant son eventually left Glasgow and they reunited in Lithuania (Kaunas, I believe). My grandmother was born there soon after.

I would really love to know what happened to him from late 1917 to 1920. Do you think those who left Archangel would have gone to join the Tsar's White Army? Or might they have joined the Bolshevik Red Army? There were a lot of socialists in Lithuanian community in Glasgow (being that they were largely exploited miners!). My great-aunt recently told me that several of my great-grand-uncles fled to the United States in 1917 "because they didn't want to fight against their brothers". I suspect that she might be translating it as "brothers" but actually they didn't want to fight against their "comrades". If they were sympathetic to the Bolsheviks, they certainly wouldn't want to go join the White Army. Do you think this is possible? I'm not sure why they wouldn't have chosen to go to the Western Front instead though (other than just trying to avoid fighting altogether, of course!). Any suggestions for how I might confirm this?

Perhaps those of us who are in Scotland (I'm in Edinburgh) should get together to compare notes. Maybe we can come up with a plan for tracking down some of this information.

 

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  • 7 months later...

Paul Lucus and Dubbs, you mentioned a link to the 1100 Lithuanians list, back in 2013 and something about a link. I then cannot see any reference to such link. I am looking for the passenger deportation list in 1917 and information as to where I could find this. Any clues please ? Thanks in advance 

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  • 2 months later...
paullucas01

I have not been able to find any lists of deportees in 1917 or later, up to 1920 for the women and children.

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