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Casualty Clearing Station at Ailly?


LEUZEWOOD

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Evening all,

I have just been reading a transcript of the journals of 3438 Cpl. Reginald Oliver Gunton of the LRB (on the Turner Donovan website) in which he refers to being admitted to a CCS at Ailly (I presume 'Ailly-sur-Somme' near Amiens). Having looked at the lists on the LLT I can't see any reference to a CCS in this location - can anybody enlighten me please? Is it more likely a typo in the transcript?

The reason for my enquiry is that this man was wounded at Leuze Wood on 9.9.16, around the same time and location as my great grandfather, and I'm trying to establish (if it's possible) what route of evacuation he may have taken from the field via CCS etc. to base hospital.

Cheers

T-O-T-S

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Dear Tom

Could this be Heilly? The French seem to miss off the H, and so he would have heard the name as Ailly.

There were two CCS at Heilly Station. It is worth a visit. The road from the front runs through the village, over the railway line on which there is a small rual halt, and within a humdred yards of the main road. The two CCS were either side of the road that continued from the village, over the railway, up to the main road. The cemetery is just up the hill. Such were the numbers of casualties brought there after July 1st that a number of the headstones have three names upon them. There is thus no room for cap badges on the headstones. uniquely, there is a loggia, in which the brickwork incorporates stones engraved with the relevant badges. Just up the hill is the field upon which Richthofen landed for the last time.

Hope this helps

Bruce

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Dear Tom

Could this be Heilly? The French seem to miss off the H, and so he would have heard the name as Ailly.

There were two CCS at Heilly Station. It is worth a visit. The road from the front runs through the village, over the railway line on which there is a small rual halt, and within a humdred yards of the main road. The two CCS were either side of the road that continued from the village, over the railway, up to the main road. The cemetery is just up the hill. Such were the numbers of casualties brought there after July 1st that a number of the headstones have three names upon them. There is thus no room for cap badges on the headstones. uniquely, there is a loggia, in which the brickwork incorporates stones engraved with the relevant badges. Just up the hill is the field upon which Richthofen landed for the last time.

Hope this helps

Bruce

Great bit of info, thanks very much Bruce. I've just checked on the map and the location seems to fit - not that far from the front at Leuze Wood. LLT has this down as CCS 36 which was in Heilly in September and there seem to be some records for it on the NA (to add to my ever increasing list). I guess there were so many CCS clustered in the Somme region at that time that this could be a needle in a haystack affair, but it's a start!

I'm visiting the Somme in November so will pay a visit to Heilly on your advice.

Thanks again.

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You can park alongside the entrance. If you then go through the loggia and stand at the wall, looking downhill, you can easily visualise exactly what it was like in September 1916. You will notice that the German section of graves have been lifted and reburied elsewhere, and that the ranks of headstones are interrupted by a marble column. This was a grave marker to an Australian killed in an accident, and his mates clubbed together to get the grave marker made, and then petitioned the IWGC for it to remain.

Enjoy your visit.

Bruce

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Tom,

On the 6th September 1916 1/7th King’s Liverpool Regiment was in action at Tea Trench which is about 3 miles north west of Leuze Wood the other side of Delville in fact, a good proportion of the men who died of wounds related to that action are buried at Heilly Station Cemetery so it was a well established evacuation route.

All the best,

Paul.

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Thanks again guys.

After a bit more digging it seems that No.s 36, 38 and 2/2 London CCS were at Heilly in 1916. After a quick look on the NA website nothing was jumping out at me - I don't suppose if anyone knows to what extent if at all any operational records, admission registers etc. still exist for them?

Cheers

Tom

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