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Beau Geste

He must have been some guy

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Beau Geste

This photopgraph was taken recently in Nettleham Village church near Lincoln. I've only ever seen one other original marker (in the museum in Manchester). He must have been quite a guy for his men to inscribe it as they did. He was one of three brothers - all killed in the Great War. The other two were the Reverend (Chaplain 4th class) Charles Ivo Sinclair Hood and Martin Arthur Frankland Hood. I have traced the first two on the CWGC's website but haven't been able to find anything on M A F Hood. Any information on this trio would be appreciated.

Sorry about the size of the photo and the difficulty reading the inscription. In essence it says " In memory of a great colonel. Died of Wounds 15th May 1918".

Kind regards,

Harry

post-18180-0-16847100-1312357936.jpg

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jdoyle

M A F Hood :

http://www.cwgc.org/...casualty=380898

some info on the Nettleham Roll of Honour page :

http://www.roll-of-h.../Nettleham.html

http://www.masonicgr...php?string=1521

He appears to have been on the Bluebell at the time of the Aud gun running/Roger Casement landing

http://1914-1918.inv...showtopic=89914

Alban John Frankland Hood appears to have been another brother. Commissioned 3rd KOSB Jan 1915. Medal card has Allan John Frankland, 2nd KOSB attached Ministry of Munitions.

The father was a bit of a cricketer

http://www.cricketar...970/445970.html

with a small link to Oscar Wilde

http://www.freemason...beresiner8.html

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Beau Geste

M A F Hood :

http://www.cwgc.org/...casualty=380898

some info on the Nettleham Roll of Honour page :

http://www.roll-of-h.../Nettleham.html

http://www.masonicgr...php?string=1521

He appears to have been on the Bluebell at the time of the Aud gun running/Roger Casement landing

http://1914-1918.inv...showtopic=89914

Alban John Frankland Hood appears to have been another brother. Commissioned 3rd KOSB Jan 1915. Medal card has Allan John Frankland, 2nd KOSB attached Ministry of Munitions.

The father was a bit of a cricketer

http://www.cricketar...970/445970.html

with a small link to Oscar Wilde

http://www.freemason...beresiner8.html

Thank you J. At the moment I'm wrestling with a hedge that requires a hefty trim.When I'm finished I've now got something to look forward to reading

Yours aye

Harry

Harry

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Beau Geste

Hello J

Thanks for the attachments. They answered just about all the questions I had about this amazing family.

This is another plaque we looked at in the church in Nettleham. One doesn't normally come across lists of those who fought and survived to return home and I must say I felt that it said something positive about the people of that small Lincolnshire village.

Kind regards,

Harry

post-18180-0-67672700-1312458075.jpg

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Matthew

What an elegant turn of phrase. :poppy:

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Beau Geste

What an elegant turn of phrase. :poppy:

Pardon !!!!

As a scouse, I've never before been accused of elegant speech ! Please explain.

Mind you I am an Everton supporter and we are known to be somewhat more "elegant" in the way we express our ideas than those on the other side of Stanley Park. :closedeyes:

Harry

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seaJane

My guess is that Matthew means, on the memorial. In which case I'd agree.

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jdoyle

Hello J

Thanks for the attachments. They answered just about all the questions I had about this amazing family.

This is another plaque we looked at in the church in Nettleham. One doesn't normally come across lists of those who fought and survived to return home and I must say I felt that it said something positive about the people of that small Lincolnshire village.

Kind regards,

Harry

glad to have been able to help. An interesting family for sure.

Wheelock in Cheshire has a similar memorial in one of the churches though not as ornate (or elegantly phrased) listing those who died as well as those who served.

John

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Old Owl

The original wooden crosses are indeed quite rare--I think that I have seen probably around 15 in twice as many years. On the other hand lists of those who served and returned are pretty common and are to be found in many churches up and down the country.

I have to admit that I am a bit of a 'memorial addict' and I have to visit any church which happens to cross our path whilst out walking or whilst visiting other parts of the UK. I have found quite a number of individual memorials to men whose medals I have in my collection. These can be found in the form of marble or brass plaques, sometimes as stained glass windows, inscribed pews, lecterns or chancel screens etc., etc. It is well worth a look if a church is open :thumbsup:

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Beau Geste

The original wooden crosses are indeed quite rare--I think that I have seen probably around 15 in twice as many years. On the other hand lists of those who served and returned are pretty common and are to be found in many churches up and down the country.

I have to admit that I am a bit of a 'memorial addict' and I have to visit any church which happens to cross our path whilst out walking or whilst visiting other parts of the UK. I have found quite a number of individual memorials to men whose medals I have in my collection. These can be found in the form of marble or brass plaques, sometimes as stained glass windows, inscribed pews, lecterns or chancel screens etc., etc. It is well worth a look if a church is open :thumbsup:

Thank you Old Owl,

Your "success rate" is most impressive. As I said in an earlier posting it was my first "Mercifully Spared" list and yet

I too have similar interests. My wife and I are caravanners and never miss the chance of visiting churches in the places

we pass through. I also have a habit of searching for CWGC grave markers in cemeteries we pass.

My wife tells me that one of these days I'll run into a parked vehicle but I always try to keep one eye on thre road! :whistle:

Best wishes,

Harry

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elewis

I think it is good that those that served and survived were also recorded, as many could have been wounded and they all would have suffered the same horrors, I wish that they were recorded and honoured more frequently.

The church in Guiting Power, North Gloucestershire, actually takes this slightly further on its Roll of Honour. There are 4 sections -

- "These men made the extreme sacrifice"

- "Died on home service"

- "Returned from the war"

- "On home service"

This list actually covers Lower Guiting (the old name for Guiting Power), Farmcote (about 10 houses, located approx 5 miles away with a small church (probably better described as a chapel of ease to Guiting power) and the hamlets of Barton and Roel (again maximum of 10 houses each).

Interestingly, or more accurately confusingly!, Farmcote church also has a Roll of Honour covering the same area and names, but there are about 12 subtle differences on "Returned from the war", mainly with the initials T and J, but some A and D, it looks as if somebody created an original manuscript list which was then copied by different people to create the 2 Rolls of Honour one of which read the initials differently to the other.

The most significant differences are in 2 surnames - CHAMBERLAIN / CHAMBERLAND and BIRT / BERT, a given name of ALBERT / ALFRED, and one name only being on the one roll.

It had me confused enough to go back and double check my transcription of both lists!. But perhaps it should teach us all that sometimes errors were made on War Memorials / Rolls of Honour.

Evan

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jdoyle

I think it is good that those that served and survived were also recorded, as many could have been wounded and they all would have suffered the same horrors, I wish that they were recorded and honoured more frequently.

my Gt Grandfather being a case in point. Remembered on the Wheelock Memorial as one of those who served and survived but his death in 1943 was directly attributable to war wounds from Nov 1918. Sadly, no CWGC memorial.

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Beau Geste

my Gt Grandfather being a case in point. Remembered on the Wheelock Memorial as one of those who served and survived but his death in 1943 was directly attributable to war wounds from Nov 1918. Sadly, no CWGC memorial.

Thank you Evan and you too J,

I couldn't agree more. I know it's "off piste" but my father also died prematurely (in 1963) from treatment he received in a German POW camp (Stalag V111B) during WW2. On a slightly different note if those who fought and survived during the Great War had been commemorated like those from Nettleham and elsewhere, the search that I got involved in trying to prove that my grandfather served in the 15th Bn The Welch Regt might well have been a great deal easier.

Harry

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beresford69

I was leafing through some of my Great Aunt's old photos and memorabilia last week and came across this snapshot. Its quite hard to read the name on the cross but I'm fairly sure that it is Lt Col Edward Hood and therefore the same cross, now in the church in Lincolnshire as shown in photograph with the original post. I've tried to work out why my Aunt (who lived in Dublin) had it and it would seem the Hoods had some Irish connections. Three of her brothers served in the War and one of them may have taken it.



Geoff


post-59677-0-01354400-1384329782_thumb.j

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kenericm

I am a guide in Lincoln Cathedral.  On the altar within the Soldiers Chapel is a cross and candlesticks.  These were given by Mrs Grace Hood (mother of the 4 Hood sons).  Also, at the entrance to the South East Judgement porch doorway there is a statue of the virgin Mary and child, also given by Mrs Hood.  Another interesting snippet - their niece, Dorothy Hodgkin, won the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 1964.

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Ron Clifton

Hello Beau Geste

 

Many thanks for posting this reminder of a village I lived in for two years in the early 1970s. I'm afraid I cannot recall either the cross or the memorial - are they in the area under the tower, around the font?

 

It was a much larger village when I was there - a dormitory for Lincoln with a population of around 4,000 - but I remember those days with great fondness.

 

Ron

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Steven Broomfield

Mr C: Beua Geste (according to his profile information) has not visited the Forum for over 4 years (March 2015).

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JulianB

In the 1980s I spent a few years as an archaeologist in Jordan working in the Roman city of Gerasa (mod Jerash). 

One day we were delighted when Dorothy Hodgkin came to visit us. The daughter of the famous Crowfoots who did so much work there -  very high up in the heroes of archaeology!

Our delight was in her memories of Jerash in the 1930s  ........ only later did we realised / were told that she was a world famous nobel laureate !!!!

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Jim Clay
3 hours ago, Steven Broomfield said:

Mr C: Beua Geste (according to his profile information) has not visited the Forum for over 4 years (March 2015).

 

I recall Mr Geste as a quite prolific poster.  I may be misremembering and thereby unfairly maligning him (for which, if so, humble apologies) but wasn't he one of those (fortunately few) chaps who got upset at ... something ... and threw his toys out of t'pram?

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Steven Broomfield
26 minutes ago, Jim Clay said:

 

I recall Mr Geste as a quite prolific poster.  I may be misremembering and thereby unfairly maligning him (for which, if so, humble apologies) but wasn't he one of those (fortunately few) chaps who got upset at ... something ... and threw his toys out of t'pram?

 

You may be right, Mr C, but blessed if I can recall.

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