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Wendy Macpherson

~ Map question please ~

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Wendy Macpherson

Hello all

I've got another one for you! :blink:

This snippet I have here is from 'Special Map A' of the Ploegsteert area, not sure what date. Am I correct in assuming that the green line that happens to run the length of the map indicates the British front line. Can you also tell me what the little green wiggles by Au Chasseur Cab are for.

Thanks Wendy

post-49999-0-64990700-1310514389.jpg

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Khaki

Hi Wendy,

Had a look at a couple of books, the only thing I could see that was similar to the green diagonal lines, seems to interepreted as 'area of activity'and the small one's seem to be 'dugout's or covered trench'. There seems to be very little material on this subject, hopefully someone else can assist with idea's.

regards

khaki

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Wendy Macpherson

khaki

Thank you for having a look for me, I found out that it's called a situation map.

Still keen to confirm what the green squiggles are up at Au Chasseur Cab.

Also have another question.

This is a snippet from a German map that I think I found here on the forum. Can you please tell me what the markings represent in the pink box. Are they machine gun or artillery positions?

Thanks again, Wendy

post-49999-0-89830600-1310545972.jpg

Edited by Wendy Mac...

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jacksdad

Hi Wendy

i agree, based on pure stab in the dark guess work, with Kharki.

What i do know is that the Germans had been mostly pushed back over the river all along the southern area, but held onto la Basse Ville in force. The New Zealanders (2nd Well & 1st Auck) crossed over the railway line here in an attempt to take the village ruins on the 21/22 and 22/23 June 1917. But could not hold the ground and withdrew.

so the map must date to this period.

Au Chasseur Caberet was captured a week before this on the 14/15 June and held from then on. it stood 'on a slight rise' the only rise on this small plain - other then the railway line, i wonder then if the green marks infer that this was considered an area of importance and a very important strong point? therefore considered as strategically as important as the front line and therefore got the once over with the green pen as well??

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tim_oz

Wendy

On the German map those would be British Artillery positions. Ive seen the green line on other situation maps particulary from the retreat to the Hindenburg line in 1917 and they would seem to mark the approximate location of a still mobile front. Not sure what the squiggles are.

Tim B

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Khaki

Hi Wendy,

The open 'staple' shaped markings usually indicate a gun emplacement, whether or not the Germans used the same or similar markings I don't know.

khaki

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Khaki

By gun emplacement, I meant artillery

khaki

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Wendy Macpherson

Ok thanks again for that Khaki ~ It's all starting to make sense to me now.

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Wendy Macpherson

Wendy

On the German map those would be British Artillery positions. Ive seen the green line on other situation maps particularly from the retreat to the Hindenburg line in 1917 and they would seem to mark the approximate location of a still mobile front. Not sure what the squiggles are.

Tim B

Thanks tim

That green line (mobile front) would tie in with the dates Roger mentions and with some other information I have just been reading. Is the term 'mobile front' the same or similar to a 'active front'

Wendy

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Khaki

Excuse my jumping in, but in my opinion, a 'mobile front' would suggest a 'fluid' front probably consisting the identified movement of troops that were no longer using fixed lineal positions (trench) as a permanent defence line, including the transfer in and out of units, the shortening of the line, and also retreat with rearguard actions. An area of activity would to me indicate an area of movement reported by Intelligence that the immediate purpose of which had not yet been confirmed.

khaki

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connaughtranger

Hi

Do you know if the green lines were manuscript or printed?

Regards

Martin

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Wendy Macpherson

Ok thanks for that everyone, thanks Khaki for explaining 'mobile front' for me. After countless hours searching I have found the special map 'A' on the Western Front CD ROM it is dated 15.6.17 so right on the date that Roger mentioned. The green line runs for about 2000 yards from Burnt out Farm down by Ploegsteert Wood to Sunken Farm up towards Warneton, so there is defiant movement towards La Basse-Ville.

I hadn't realised that Au Chasseur Cab was up on a rise but have also found a map that shows the height as 30 feet. Forum member Frederick has been and taken some photos of the area for me.

Thanks for helping me

Wendy

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Wendy Macpherson

Hi

Do you know if the green lines were manuscript or printed?

Regards

Martin

I think it's printed Martin, the green strokes are all exactly the same length and spacing looks to perfect for it to be hand done.

Wendy

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connaughtranger

I think it's printed Martin, the green strokes are all exactly the same length and spacing looks to perfect for it to be hand done.

Wendy

Hi

The reason I asked about the lines being manuscript is that green was a colour used sometimes by artillery for standing barrages or specific targets by a certain calibre gun

post-24996-0-04307100-1310815697.jpg

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connaughtranger

This section is also of Ploegsteert but from 1918

post-24996-0-50221900-1310815840.jpg

Finally on the Somme:

post-24996-0-42772500-1310815916.jpg

Regards

Martin

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connaughtranger

It is possible that these additions were manuscript. The very straight hatching that appears on your map could perhaps be the impression of the cloth backing on the map coming through. If you look at the blobs of colour on the post above you can see that effect quite clearly

Regards

Martin

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Wendy Macpherson

Yes that could be a possibility. The map is from around the time the Kiwis were pushing the Germans back over the river Lys.

The green line in post one looks like ink rather than colour pencil.

Wendy

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