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Remembered Today:

PTE A Loosemore VC winner West Riding Regt


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Pals

Another Picture from The Great War Mag.

Regards

Simon

PteALoosemoreWestRReg.jpg

Arnold Loosemore VC DCM (7 June 1896, Sheffield, England - 10 April 1924)

He was 21 years old, and a private in the 8th Battalion, The Duke of Wellington's (West Riding) Regiment during the First World War when the following deed took place for which he was awarded the VC.

On 11 August 1917 south of Langemarck, Belgium, during the attack on a strongly held enemy position and his platoon having been held up by heavy machine-gun fire, Private Loosemore crawled through partially cut wire, dragging his Lewis gun with him and single-handed dealt with a strong party of the enemy, killing about 20 of them. Immediately afterwards his Lewis gun was destroyed and three of the enemy rushed at him, but he shot them with his revolver. Later he shot several enemy snipers, and on returning to the original post he brought back a wounded comrade under heavy fire.

On the 18th of October 1918 he was badly wounded by machine gun fire near Villiers-en-Cauchies and eventually had his left leg amputated. He died on the 10th of April 1924 from tuberculosis.

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This webpage tells the whole story of a man who had returned to "A Land Fit For Heroes"

http://www.chrishobbs.com/arnoldloosemore1917.htm

On 18th October 1918 he was badly wounded in both legs by machine gun fire in an attack on a ridge near Villers-en-Cauchies. Such were the extent of the injuries he was eventually to have his left leg amputated. After demobilisation Arnold returned to Sheffield and married Amy Morton on 24th August 1920 at St Andrews Church. Sharrow Sheffield His occupation is given as "poultry farmer". They were to have a son the following year who was named after his father.

Douglas Lamb in his book "Lest We Forget" details what happened to the family after the war. Disabled through the loss of a leg, the Sheffield Rotary Club provided Arnold and his family with a bungalow and pony and trap. Sadly the long term effect of the wounds led to his early death at the age of 27 on 10th April 1924. Max Arthur in his recently published book on VC holders gives Arnold's home as being in Stannington, and ascribes his death as being due to contracting tuberculosis. Arnold was buried five days later on 15th April 1924 in the new churchyard of All Saints Churchyard in Ecclesall. It appears that the grave was purchased by a relative who had died a few days earlier

His bereaved wife Amy and three year old son were left without financial resources when the British government refused to pay her a War Widows pension on the grounds that she was aware of his injuries when she married him and as he was no longer a serving soldier at the time of marriage in 1920, she was not entitled to any monies. The government\army did not even ensure that Arnold had a grave to himself for the one in the churchyard in Ecclesall, is a shared one. Lloyd George's cry of "a country fit for heroes" has never sounded so abject and hollow.

The final part of the story.

He (Arnold Loosemore) was given a fitting funeral organised by the City Council, procession from Hillsborough to Ecclesall with crowds lining the streets, service by the Bishop etc. Then his penniless widow was sent a bill for the whole thing by the Council !

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There is a useful six page write up on Sgt Arnold LOOSEMORE V.C., D.C.M. in VCs of The First World War: Passchendale by Stephen Snelling.

His D.C.M. is for the night raid in the Zillebeke Sector of the 19-20 June, 1918 when more than 350 men attacked the enemy positions, capturing eleven prisoners and a light machine gun. At this juncture LOOSEMORE was serving with the 1/4th West Ridings - they lost 3 killed, 17 men wounded and 1 man missing - this night raid resulted in twenty one gallantry awards, including a D.C.M. for LOOSEMORE the D.C.M. citation is printed in full with a host of supporting details.

He had previously served with the York and Lancasters seeing action at Suvla Bay during the Gallipoli Campaign and remained until the evacuation from the Peninsula in December 1915, later transferring to the 8th West Ridings before going to France in 1916.

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Then his penniless widow was sent a bill for the whole thing by the Council !

Peter

A terrible way to repay a hero and his widow.

im shocked.

Simon

There is a useful six page write up on Sgt Arnold LOOSEMORE V.C., D.C.M. in VCs of The First World War: Passchendale by Stephen Snelling.

His D.C.M. is for the night raid in the Zillebeke Sector of the 19-20 June, 1918 when more than 350 men attacked the enemy positions, capturing eleven prisoners and a light machine gun. At this juncture LOOSEMORE was serving with the 1/4th West Ridings - they lost 3 killed, 17 men wounded and 1 man missing - this night raid resulted in twenty one gallantry awards, including a D.C.M. for LOOSEMORE the D.C.M. citation is printed in full with a host of supporting details.

He had previously served with the York and Lancasters seeing action at Suvla Bay during the Gallipoli Campaign and remained until the evacuation from the Peninsula in December 1915, later transferring to the 8th West Ridings before going to France in 1916.

Philip

Many Thanks. Puts some more meat on the bone.

Simon

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  • 1 year later...

To anybody who is interested in contacting me by email ( yikes_it_sykes@optusnet.com.au ) regarding my Great Uncle Arnold Loosemoore . Who I discovered in November 2011. I have found a lot of info from this site, but more would be great.

My Mother Selina ( nee Loosemoore ) was Arnolds niece. Regards Bill Sykes

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  • 3 weeks later...
  • 4 weeks later...

Having done some more searching I realize I have put the wrong name and Death date for Ernest, he has no middle name and he died in 1955 making him 56 years of age.

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