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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Remembered Today:

the brooding soldier


jwp2007

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took this pic during a visit in glorious weather on the 20th may,when i returned home bought this old post card of the unveiling, thought it may be of interest.

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2.

regards,

john.

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John

Thanks for posting the photo. I see the image came from the Antony photographic studio in Ypres. I have a recollection there may be a set of photos from the unveiling ceremony. Is there anything on the back of the photo?

Chris

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no, just the normal postcard divided back chris,unwritten,

john

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ah my favorite memorial in the whole of the western front,what year would the photo have been taken

Biff

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Have these photos by Anthony of Ypres ever appeared in a book dedicated solely to this photographer? if not it seems like an opportunity missed. Excellent old photo of the memorial.

Regards

Norman

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biff,date of unveiling was on July 8 1923,norman, sure i saw a reference to a book with anthony's pictures in some time ago but can't seem to find any info on it now,

regards,

john.

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The book is :

"Godenschemering over Ieper"

Ieper gezien door de fotografen Léontine, Maurice en Robert Antony 1893 - 1930"

by Jan Dewilde

2007

240 pages

24 x 33.5 cm

D/2007/6486/2

ISBN: 9789076991115

Of course only a 'small' (?) selection of the whole Antony collection.

Mind you, only Ypres, and also family photos, and pre-war Ypres.

I would say : maybe approx half of the photos related to WW1 (and shortly after).

Total number of photos ? I haven't counted them, but as there are 1 or 2 photos on most pages ...

Aurel

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aurel, many thanks for that useful information,

kind regards,

john.

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Perhaps an English version will be produced in time for the 2014 commemorations using the WW1 photos. I think that such a book would make a valuable contribution to our understanding of the period. In case such a book is printed in the Then & Now format here is my contribution to the Now bit.

5777494561_6cdee6b226_z.jpg

Regards

Norman

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John

Thanks for looking.

I went back to my files and found the reference to other photos. The Cambridge University Library has an album of 12 photos taken at the unveiling ceremony. The content of this album is described as:

An album of photographs showing various stages of the ceremony (with blank pages following). All, save 2 and 7, have handwritten captions. Only three of the photographs (1, 6 and 10) have an identified photographer - 'Antony d'Ypres'.

And then I found a film compilation of the ceremony which runs for about 6 minutes 30 seconds. This film can be seen on the British Pathe website here.

The photo shown at post 1 was taken from an angle which corresponds with the view shown at around 2 min 40 sec into the film. It's also possible to see stills of the film. The stills at 3.50 to 3.54 show a photographer with a hand held camera. This chap also appears at 4.05. As I can't find a photo of Mr Antony, it's not possible to confirm whether he is the photographer in the film. Perhaps the book Aurel mentioned has a photo.

Chris

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Had a look at the Pathe video, well when I say had a look what I really mean is the moment a crass advert started I switched it off. What a stupid idea! Anyway thanks for posting. On the subject of the photographer does anyone know where the archive of glass plates, negatives etc are and whether there is any chance that a selection of these will be placed on the internet? It seems as though this valuable source is failing to reach a wider audience and I am surprised that the WW1 photos are not more widely available. Perhaps the "In Flanders Fields" museum can throw some light on this subject.

Regards

Norman

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Chris,

No, there is no Brooding Soldier photo in the Antony book. (As a matter of fact, the selection focuses on Ypres).

To make up for it, here is another historical photo of the Monument. Taken some 20 years after the unveiling. In different company ...

Aurel

post-92-0-43390100-1307003999.jpg

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biff,date of unveiling was on July 8 1923,norman, sure i saw a reference to a book with anthony's pictures in some time ago but can't seem to find any info on it now,

regards,

john.

Good man :thumbsup:

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And then I found a film compilation of the ceremony which runs for about 6 minutes 30 seconds. This film can be seen on the British Pathe website here.

thanks chris, thats a most interesting clip,

regards,

john.

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great photo aurel, many thanks for posting,

regards,

john.

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Aurel

Interesting photo.

Does the book have a photo of either Robert or Maurice Antony? My curiosity is sparked having seen a photographer in several of the stills from the film.

Chris

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Email sent to "In Flanders Fields" museum, Ypres. It will be interesting to see if a reply is forthcoming.

Ref : Anthony of Ypres Photographic Studio

I am looking for information concerning the above immediately prior to, during and immediately after the Great War. I am of course familiar with the excellent photos produced by the studio in this period but I am unable to find any information concerning the business and photographers or indeed where the archive of glass plates, negatives and photos are at this time if in fact they have survived. I understand that there is a book on the general subject which is only available in Flemish and covers a wider time-span than the conflict.Perhaps you will be kind enough to respond to my request for information and in particular whether if the collection exists as a single entity the museum or anyone else is considering making the photos available on the internet or indeed publishing a book in English covering the Great War years.

Regsrds

Norman

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Chris,

Photo taken in 1918.

Left : Robert, next to him Maurice, and their parents.

Aurel

post-92-0-35920700-1307119514.jpg

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Norman,

I'm afraid I owe you an apology.

My posting # 7 was not complete.

Yes, the book is in Dutch, but at the end there is a translation in English (*) and French. Of the main part of the book : the biography of the photographers :

Twilight over Ypres - Ypres as seen by the photographers Léontine, Maurice and Robert Antony (1893-1930) - the Ypres Photographer's Family Antony - A biographical sketch

(*) pages 232-235

3 1/2 large pages, small font. Not a summary, but a complete translation of the Dutch text.

So I don't think there will be an English translation, as strictly spoken this is not necessary.

The "Verantwoording" of the book (Kind of "Preface", "Introduction", p. 7-8) is not translated. In it I read :

The Ypres IFFMuseum Documentation Centre has many prints. And that (it seems to me) the original photos are still in the possession of the heirs (the Ladies Antony). Copyright till 2036. But all (all ? or only the photos in the book ? I'm not sure) photos have been digitized.

The author Jan Dewilde asks the question : Important decisions will have to be taken in the near future regarding this enormous legacy. For this heritage contains many hidden treasures, belongs to our community, and has to be cherished. Maybe we urgently have to consider a "Foundation Antony" ?"

Aurel

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Great photo's, can anyone tell me what the 'bronze plaque' on the side is? it does not seem to be there in the early photographs.

thanks

khaki

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From www.wo1.be

On the monument’s right side is written: “This column marks the battlefield where 18,000 Canadians on the British left withstood the first German gas attacks on the 22-24 April 1915. 2,000 fell and lie buried nearby”.

(The French version of the inscription may be found on the monumentís left side).

Aurel

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Great photo's, can anyone tell me what the 'bronze plaque' on the side is? it does not seem to be there in the early photographs.

thanks

khaki

Here is a picture of the plaque.

Cheers

Billy

post-21580-0-12219800-1307122845.jpg

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Incidentally, the English Language plaque used to have slightly different wording at the end of the inscription. It used to say, "2,000 fell and here lie buried". This was causing some confusion as visitor numbers increased in the 70s and 80s. People took the inscription to mean that the little memorial park was the burial-ground for the 2,000 Canadians mentioned on the plaque, and wanted to know why there were no gravestones. Of course, the Canadian casualties from 22nd - 24th April 1915 are buried in various cemeteries in the area. The original plaques were removed and replaced by the ones we see today, saying, "2,000 fell and lie buried nearby".

Tom

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Thanks for the information Aurel, there is no need for any apology whatsoever. The archive must contain many gems of images taken in and around Ypres and I for one cannot see the point of not sharing this, certainly in the case of the WW1 images with a wider audience after all it is almost 100 years since the events portrayed. I cannot see any significant monetary value in a collection which is not used to its best purpose and if not already done so a nice gesture would be for the custodians of the originals to donate these to the IFF Museum or the City of Ypres with perhaps a stipulation that any profits made from the publication of same is donated to a delegated charity. Theses are of course only my thoughts on the subject and perhaps with some more facts things will become clearer. One thing I am sure of however is that images are meant to be seen and not hidden away as perhaps these are.

Regards

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