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Remembered Today:

9th Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers


jainvince

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One of our local soldiers fell on the 25th October, 2011 whilst serving with the 9 Northumberland Fusiliers. Can any pal tell me where that Regiment were on that date as I may get the chance to visit the location next week. He is buried in Bermerain Comm Cemetery. The CWGC indicates that they were buried by their mates which would indicate fighting close by. Any assistance would be appreciated.

Bernard

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Hi,

Heres three pages from the battalion history, hope they help.Hope they are big enough to read

regards

John

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John

Ctrl+ does wonders for small objects so yes could read them with ease. And they gave me all I needed to know. Many thanks for the speedy reply as I can now go and visit next week when I am travelling from mons to Le Cateau.

Bernard

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Hi

I have the WD up to 24 October 1918 which seems to cover it

“23 October 1918 - Battalion paraded at 8.45am and marched to St. Aubert pending active operations to be carried out during night 23/24 October. Battalion left St. Aubert about 8pm and relieved 8th Gloucestershire Regiment (19 Division) about 11.45pm.

24 October 1918 - In the line. The 183 Infantry Brigade (11th Battalion Suffolks Regiment on the left and 9th Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers on the right) with 4th Division on the left attacked at 4am. The battalion made good progress and captured the villages of St. Martin and Bermerain and capturing 6 officers and 150 other ranks, 4 trench mortars and 43 machine guns.

“A” and “D” Companies were in the front line with “C” and “B” Companies in support.

The battalion reached its final objective, being the high ground 1,500 yards north east of Bermerain but had to withdraw slightly owing to the battalion on its left being held up by strong resistance of the enemy in the village of Vendegies. The 1st Battalion, East Lancs Regiment who were in support came up and reinforced the two line battalions, and 184 Brigade came into support.

The enemy made a counter attack about 3pm but were repulsed.

Battalion HQ moved forward about 5pm to cellars in the village of St. Martin. Orders were received about 10.30pm to withdraw battalion and to be in reserve. Companies ordered to withdraw and arrived in billets during the early hours of 25th, “D” Company being last to arrive about 6am.

The casualties in the battalion were heavy especially in the case of the NCOs whom it appears they having charged the enemy posts and at the same time encouraging and urging on the men under them.”

Graeme

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  • 9 months later...

My Grand Uncle served in the 9th Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers. His name was Lieutenant Eric Bernard Lewis Piggott. Lt. Piggott was wounded 3 times (27-4-15, 6-7-16, 16-4-18) during his service and was awarded the Military Cross for his actions. The MC award was gazetted on 16 September 1918. I would appreciate any suggestions for finding out more about the circumstances of the award of his MC as well as his time with this unit.

The records I have show that he was with the 9th Battalion overseas (France and Belgium) from 14-6-16 to 11-3-17 and then again from 12-11-17 to 30-4-18. Previously he served overseas with the 5th Battalion London Regiment from 4-11-14 to 9-5-15.

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  • 2 months later...

My Grand Uncle served in the 9th Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers. His name was Lieutenant Eric Bernard Lewis Piggott. Lt. Piggott was wounded 3 times (27-4-15, 6-7-16, 16-4-18) during his service and was awarded the Military Cross for his actions. The MC award was gazetted on 16 September 1918. I would appreciate any suggestions for finding out more about the circumstances of the award of his MC as well as his time with this unit.

The records I have show that he was with the 9th Battalion overseas (France and Belgium) from 14-6-16 to 11-3-17 and then again from 12-11-17 to 30-4-18. Previously he served overseas with the 5th Battalion London Regiment from 4-11-14 to 9-5-15.

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Hi

Came across this search and it is also for my Great Uncle Eric ,I have only joined the site today and do not seem to have access to members details so cannot get hold of your email address. My name is William John Brand so you may know me already.Eric was the uncle of my late father, Stanley Brand and the brother of Stanley's mother Dorothy -but I would think you know this already. Some research I have done identifies his commanding officer as Lt Col.Vignoles and there are several references to him and therefore to the actions of the battalion in a book available on Amazon called The Battle for Flanders -German defeat on the Lys 1918 by Chris Baker.I do know he was in D company of the Battalion and presume he was wounded in the fighting around Keersebrom to the northeast of Bailleul on the 16 April 1918.

Erics commanding officer has also deposited his own diaries at the National records office and at some time when I have retired I will hunt them out.

Please get in touch.

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there are several references to him and therefore to the actions of the battalion in a book available on Amazon called The Battle for Flanders -German defeat on the Lys 1918 by Chris Baker

:thumbsup:

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Hi

Came across this search and it is also for my Great Uncle Eric ,I have only joined the site today and do not seem to have access to members details so cannot get hold of your email address. My name is William John Brand so you may know me already.Eric was the uncle of my late father, Stanley Brand and the brother of Stanley's mother Dorothy -but I would think you know this already. Some research I have done identifies his commanding officer as Lt Col.Vignoles and there are several references to him and therefore to the actions of the battalion in a book available on Amazon called The Battle for Flanders -German defeat on the Lys 1918 by Chris Baker.I do know he was in D company of the Battalion and presume he was wounded in the fighting around Keersebrom to the northeast of Bailleul on the 16 April 1918.

Erics commanding officer has also deposited his own diaries at the National records office and at some time when I have retired I will hunt them out.

Please get in touch.

William I tried to send you an email to an address that I had received from a family member recently but got a delviery failure :mellow: . You can contact me at my email Email me

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