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Remembered Today:

Austro-Hungarian Observer's photos


varifleman

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Here are several photos from the photo-diaries of Austro-Hungarian Hauptmann Ernst August von Mandelsloh who was an observer assigned to Flik 15 (Fliegerkompanie 15). He flew missions over the Russian, Serbian and Balkan fronts and included many aerial photos and location photos and maps/descriptions in his diaries. After the war he became a landscape artist. Any comments or additional information about Von Mandelsloh would be appreciated.

: War Photos 1914-15, 23 August 15 V. Mandelsloh

: Krakau-Limonova Battle, Russian Positions under fire north of Krakau, Russian infantry shelters.

: Battle on the Dunajec, Dec 1914-early Jan 1915

: Russian batteries (B) and infantry dug-outs by Zglobice s/w of Tarnow.

And a few more.:Campaign against Serbia and Montenegro Oct 1915 til Feb 1916 north (below) Vojusa; Map area south of Belgrade; crashed aeroplane; Naval aeroplane in the Bocche; Lt Bratmann and I ready for take-off

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Thanks for posting these photos. It seems he was active in the early part of the war.

I think the landplane in the bottom photo is an Aviatik B.II, and the seaplane is a Lohner, probably the L version.

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Thanks you very much for sharing the photos with us. I agree with Adrian that the landplane looks like an Aviatik B.II (Austro-Hungarian series number 32) with what looks like an additional gravity fuel tank above the upper wing, and the seaplane is a Lohner L series.

As is so often the case with photographs of Great War aeroplanes, identification would be much easier if they were taken from an angle which shows the serial number.

Gareth

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Thanks Adrian and Gareth for identifying the aircraft. Von Mandelsloh also flew missions over Serbia, Albania and Montenegro. I'll post more interesting photos soon. Seaplane is Lohner Nr M31 powered by Mercedes 100 HP engine.

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Thanks Adrian and Gareth for identifying the aircraft. Von Mandelsloh also flew missions over Serbia, Albania and Montenegro. I'll post more interesting photos soon. Seaplane is Lohrer Nr M31 powered by Mercedes 100 HP engine.

Well, the M series were ten L series boats to be built by the Naval Dockyard at Pola [M31 was the first, and it's not certain that all ten were constructed] so Adrian and I weren't very far off the mark. There's a photograph of M31 in Heinz Nowarra's Marine Aircraft of the 1914-1918 War.

We look forward to seeing more photographs.

Gareth

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I've posted several more loose photos from the diary for your enjoyment.

A few more photos:

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more photos added

Kirol Balzareno and Robert Medinger recorded 1 victory each according to Jan Safirik's listing of Austro-Hungarian Aces and aviators. Capt (later Major) Stohanzl (right) is shown conversing with Gen-Col Kovess (middle) by what looks like an Austrian-built Albatross D-III. Any other information or comments welcomed.

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The Albatros is a D.III, and one of the very early ones built by the Austro-Hungarians. If the men weren't in the way, we could see the serial, starting with 53, on the fuselage side. It's unusual to see an A-H D.III with a fuselage cross. However, it was applied, and then later removed, from early 53 series machines.

Gareth

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  • 1 month later...

Here are several photos from the photo-diaries of Austro-Hungarian Hauptmann Ernst August von Mandelsloh who was an observer assigned to Flik 15 (Fliegerkompanie 15). He flew missions over the Russian, Serbian and Balkan fronts and included many aerial photos and location photos and maps/descriptions in his diaries. After the war he became a landscape artist. Any comments or additional information about Von Mandelsloh would be appreciated.

: War Photos 1914-15, 23 August 15 V. Mandelsloh

: Krakau-Limonova Battle, Russian Positions under fire north of Krakau, Russian infantry shelters.

: Battle on the Dunajec, Dec 1914-early Jan 1915

: Russian batteries (B) and infantry dug-outs by Zglobice s/w of Tarnow.

And a few more.:Campaign against Serbia and Montenegro Oct 1915 til Feb 1916 north (below) Vojusa; Map area south of Belgrade; crashed aeroplane; Naval aeroplane in the Bocche; Lt Bratmann and I ready for take-off

Dear varifleman,

Lt Bratmann is my greatuncle. Do you have more photos from him? Enclosed please find a picture from his gravestone.

http://www.viennatouristguide.at/Friedhoefe/Grinzing/pers_grinzing/bratmann.htm.

Best whishes from vienna, Matthias

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Dear varifleman,

Lt Bratmann is my greatuncle. Do you have more photos from him? Enclosed please find a picture from his gravestone.

http://www.viennatouristguide.at/Friedhoefe/Grinzing/pers_grinzing/bratmann.htm.

Best whishes from vienna, Matthias

Hi Matthias: Wonderful news to hear that Lt Bratmann is your great uncle. Yhanks for photo of his grave site. My home was badly damaged by the tornadoes that blew through Glade Spring last month but all the diaries etc survived. As soon as I can get to them again (they are in storage now) I'll see if there are more photos of Lt Bratmann. Cheers, George

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Matthias and George;

Very interesting. I have to do a bit of research before I can respond intelligently. I am interested in the actions involved in the Germans and Austro-Hungarian forces crossing the Danube at and south of Beograd. I gather that Hauptmann von Mandelsloh flew observation there. The Central Powers had brought 42 cm howitzers and 30.5 cm mortars to cover the crossings.

Bob Lembke

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George;

You certainly have my sympathy and best wishes re: your storm situation, especially in sight of the recent tragedy in Joplin.

Please don't be offended by my mentioning it, but you have some material quite mis-identified, re: campaigns, place-names, etc. The albums are fascinating and valuable historical source material. I am not an authority on the campaigns in the East in WW I (not many are), but am knowledgable about some of it, and for one would be happy to work with you to identify some of the material better. I am working on a couple of books in part centered on some of those campaigns, and both my father and grand-father fought in some of those Eastern theatres. I have also spent a fair bit of time in some of those areas, especially in "ex=Jugoslavija". The fighting along the Danube, at Beograd and south of it, was very interesting and not well known. (note: Belgrade = Belgrad = Beograd) For example, the Brit Royal Navy, the French Navy, and the Russian Navy all had task forces and weaponry at Beograd fighting the Austro-Hungarian river flotillas on the Danube, which were attempting to force their way south down the Danube, for an extended period of time. You would find a visit to the Serbian fortress of Kalamagden on the Danube at Beograd fascinating, they have (or had; haven't seen it in decades) an interesting military museum there, with WW I material. I believe the fortress (or at least its predecessors) was already 700 years old when the Romans got there!

This topic and your wonderful materials could be the basis of a really great thread exploring these matters. (Certainly what has already unfolded is very interesting and useful.)

Bob Lembke

PS: Obtaining and preserving diaries, albums, etc. of the time is fascinating and can preserve irreplacable historic evidence. It is great that you (and the previous owners) have not torn up these albums to sell them piecemeal, destroying much of the historical context. I hope that you and yours "land on your feet" soon.

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Bob, thanks for your observations. As soon as I'm in permanent quarters and get the albums out of storage I'd be more than happy to work with you in using and identifying the photos etc in the diaries. I also am glad to keep these rare WWI albums intact and not parse them out so we can retain them for historical research. My grandfather was from Apatin Hungary and served as an infantrymen in the Markgraf von Baben IR No 23 just prior to emigrating to mthe US in 1913 (I have his Militaerpass with all his info) and thus missed out on WWI; although he reported to the KuK Consulate in Cleveland for possible mobilization and even registered for the draft in 1917 even though not yet a US citizen! I have several more extremely interesting KuK and German photo albums and diaries concerning campaigns on the Italian, balkan and Eastern Fronts which I'd be happy to share with you. My uncle from my Mom's Irish side of the family served in WWI as a company commander in the 306th Regt/77th NY Irish Division and fought in all the major Western Front battles and was gassed and shell-shocked but survived the war. I also have his US Army records which are very interesting. Cheers, George

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