Jump to content
Free downloads from TNA ×
The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Remembered Today:

Solway works Zeebrugge


nils d

Recommended Posts

lve read about the Solway works down in Zeebrugge docks for a long time but have never come across an explaination for why an English/Scottish works was in a Belgan harbour being operated by Germans.lts not as if its a British firm lve heard of before.

The place was a regular bomb target for the British airmen so mustve fulfilled an important function.At a guess ld say it was a power station but what exactly was it and how did it come to be there? Can anyone enlighten me?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi,

Solvay sold the plant at Zeebrugge before WWI to the German Rombacher Hüttenwerke

They produced cokes from coal imported from England

regards,

Cnock

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you gents thats a big help

So its actually SOLVAY not solway .l guess the British misread /mispronounced the word , or if the company had plants in Britian they changed it themselves which does happen.

l did google the word before asking here but l wasnt spelling it right , nor did l think of trying a rival site!

l thought it was ironic that the British were bombing a British company when in fact it was German owned! if only l knew the Latin for "silly chumps" eh Terry?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Thank you gents thats a big help

So its actually SOLVAY not solway .l guess the British misread /mispronounced the word , or if the company had plants in Britian they changed it themselves which does happen.

There is a "Solvay Works" in the area of Syracuse, New York State, USA, or at least there was one say 45 years ago when I was at university in nearby Ithaca, NY. Had the impression that it was important and big, but not sure what went on there. Anyone interested enough for me to look into it? Don't think that the Brits were bombing upstate New York during the Great War.

Bob Lembke

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The coke ovens at Zeebrugge was a regular target for the RAF during World War 2.Coke is essential to the production of steel and coking coal itself,although not rare, required a regular and reliable sourcing if steel production was not to be adversely effected.

It would not matter whose ownership was involved.The industry would be contributing to the enemy war economy and would be regarded as a legal target.Having said that,it has been said that there was some concern expressed by Kingsley Wood at the start of the WW2 air offences against Germany industry when the giant plants of I G Farben were being considered as bombing targets.We cannot possibly attack these targets as they are private property,it was claimed,he said.

Enemy industrial concerns were normally requisitioned by either side.The auto producing US subsidiaries of German Ford and Adam Opel(General Motors) were harnessed to the German war effort and were looked on as German industrial assets and were bombed.

Incidentally Fairey had an aircraft production facility at Ghent in Belgium from 1930,which folded when the Germans invaded in May 1940.No doubt the Germans requisitioned the facility for their own use and as such,would have been subject to RAF air attack.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...

thanks gents

Bob lf its only been 45 years the Solvay works should still be in Syracuse. Isnt this Rip Van Winkle `s neck of the woods?

Frank lm not well up on coke plants but dont they have big flaming vents that burn 24/7? A bit of a giveaway to the night bomber.

l hope Kingsley Wood was moved out of his job if he had that poor a grasp on things.

Terry thank you for your classical contribution . From now on when ever l see the word "inepta" l`ll think of you.;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...