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Remembered Today:

S9365 David Elder Robertson 8th Batt Black Watch


Lachlan

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Dear All

Whilst I was at my father's house to clear it out before handing back to the local council, I literally had to go through mounds of old correspondence, various documents, artifacts and photos etc. I came across old photos and documents from the First World War, of various relatives on both sides of my family. I have for some time taken an interest in my Mum's uncle David, who was killed in 1917. Whilst I was previously able to piece together various pieces of information on him (some definite and some circumstantial) via the internet and my retention of family memory, I now have in my possession a number of letters and postcards he wrote between 1915 and the end of 1916 during his army service .

What I knew already is that he was David Elder Robertson, of Bush Terrace, Musselburgh. He was either 25 or 27 when he died (according to whether you use CWGC data or the record of his volunteering). He was married (to Margaret, perhaps with a child called Janet). He was a Lance-Corporal in the 8th Btn, Black Watch, 9th (Scottish) Division. His service number was S9365. He was killed during the assault on Greenland Hill, Roeux, during the 3rd Battle of the Scarpe, Arras, on 3rd May 1917.

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Transcript of Letter No 1 – written in dark "school-coloured ink" with ink-nib or fountain pen on unlined thin paper (the writing is very clear and neat, each line is precise as if written on lined paper). This letter was written while David was at Bordon Camp, Aldershot. Having joined up on 2 June 1915 (according to available signing-up data), he was not yet part his parent battalion, 8th Black Watch, which left the UK for the Western Front in May 1915, as part of 9th Scottish Division, one of Kitchener's New Army formations of wartime volunteers. David trained with a recruit-training company for the battalion in England and later went to join the battalion on the Western Front as a replacement in late 1915.

Note the date of this letter – while David was now trained (note joined June and considered trained by late September)and was made up to Lance-Corporal to help train recruits at Bordon, that very day he wrote, the main battalion was meanwhile going into action with 9th Scottish Division in Kitchener's Army's first battle – the Battle of Loos, where many men lost their lives. David's move to the Western Front became more urgent after the battle losses became apparent over the next days, though, as this letter was written before any casualties were suffered, he was keen to go to the Front anyway.

Please note, I have not changed or altered the text or punctuation of the letter in any way.

26/9/15

Dear Father & Mother

Just a few lines to you. Well you would be disappointed at my non-arrival again. Well we were told plainly by the SM in front of the officers that we get our pass on Friday sure after the manouvres. Well after the manouvres were all past Captain Hamilton Johnston paraded us all in front of him and told us that the adjutant had given him orders that no man was to get a pass until he was under orders for the front, and that we were to thank the last training company for keeping us back because they didn't come back to time. Well I am very downhearted for I could have done fine with a week at home. I am fairly done up with the cold and I am feeling very miserable. We had very bad weather for manouvres and we lay for 20 nights out in the open with 1 blanket for a covering. It was no joke I had charge of a section so I got very little sleep I had to see that they took their turn on guard and I had to be ready for messages at any time. Well it was a great display. There were 5 Batts – the Camerons, the Seaforths, the Scottish Rifles and the RFA you can bet there was some noise from the big guns and all the rest it was the same as real warfare only no casualties for a wonder. After it was all over you could see nothing but soldiers rising from everywhere. There were a good crowd watching and we were a hungry and tired lot after it was all over. We were expecting some real fighting with the Camerons for the Black Watch and them are great enemies they don't like us but we were warned about it. Of course you will know that. You could see nothing but motor bikes tearing along the road keeping up a correspondence they had free scope. Well I was glad when it was over for I was a tired one without sleep. If I had not had a stripe I would have got a sleep all right but I had to look after a section. Well I told them I was handing in my stripe and I was paraded in front of the Captain, and I was fairly put through the mill and asked my reason for it I made the excuse I had no notion of it and he told me I was foolish. He said I was picked out as qualified for the job and that if I changed my mind I would not be long in getting another but I stuck to my decision so he said he would see about it. I am still wearing the stripe till I am told to hand it in but I have heard no more about it. You see they have picked me out to drill recruits on the square. I was to do a parade at night under the SM for advanced drill, and after I came back of my pass I was to be on the square drilling recruits for good. Well my intentions are to get my pass as quick as possible and get out to the front for my heart is set on it. I want to be able to say I have been at the front and done my bit.

(letter ends – final page / pages are missing).

As he was a lance-corporal when he was killed in 1917, it seems that he never got that chance to get rid of his stripe.

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David at Bordon Camp 1915. He is marked with an X (by a family member)

post-60205-0-02513300-1300868982.jpg

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This letter of late 1915 is to his sister Annie (Robertson) Montgomery, back in Musselburgh. David is now on the Western Front. The letter is written in pencil on plain, rough quality paper. It is hard to decipher some of the writing as the pencil text has become very faint in some areas of the letter and is actually unreadable in places. The handwriting is now something of a scrawl, not nearly so neat as it was back in Bordon training camp.

Peter is Annie's husband, Peter Montgomery (my Granddad) who was in the UK as a piper with 2/7th Royal Scots. Wee Davie is Peter and Annie's son and Jessie, their daughter (my Auntie Jessie).

25/10/15 8th B Watch

B Coy

No 5 Platoon

BEF France

B E F means British Expeditionary Force

Dear Annie

Just a few lines to you hoping you and Peter and Wee Davie and Jessie are all well. Well Annie the weather is very bad cold and wet. Well we are out of the trenches for a rest …(unreadable)... for you are not long in getting lousy. Well it was a great experience being into the ……….. for the first time ……………… I got my first sleep last night after being in the trench for about 8 days. We will be in again in about 2 days. The rest of the Battalion was in for about 2 weeks before we reinforced them. Some were lucky getting out with them. Everything is leveled to the ground here there is nothing but german …..to see. I have seen some so bad sights here but I am getting used to it. But I am sorry to tell you that I am suffering from the old pains I used to have but I will have to stick it. I could hardly walk for pains after coming out of the trenches rumatics is no joke. But never mind we will trust in God to see us through it. I seen one of my mates blown to bits with an aerial torpedo. I was one of the lucky ones but believe me it was nothing to what the Huns were getting they were getting shelled like hell. I have been in what you call a sap that is a sort of ….. trench to the German trench you can hear them talking quite plainly for you are quite close to them. That is what the sap is for listening first and you are not sorry when you get out of it. I am listening to the guns now it is a constant bang bang night and day. It is a fine sight at night when we send up the star shells it lights up the whole place and you can see if the enemy is coming over. The bayonet charges are the worst here but you just have to put your mind to it and go into it like hell. I will close now. Your loving Bro Davie. See and write often. God bless you all and I hope it will be my luck to meet you all again. Goodnight

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A photo showing Annie, David's married sister, as a war worker at the Aero Division of Bruntons, Musselburgh. As we look it it, she is back row far right.

post-60205-0-97523300-1300874972.jpg

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YMCA "On Active Service" standardized postcard addressed to David's father, Mr David Robertson, 40 Campie Road, Musselburgh, Scotland. It is stamped by Field Post Office 26 dated 4 No 15 (ie 4/11/15). A triangular censor stamp reads Passed By Censor No 1624.

The message side has the YMCA triangle logo. It is written in purple indelible pencil and reads:-

ON ACTIVE SERVICE

Address Reply to L David E Robertson No S9365 3/11/15 Section B Company 8th Battalion B Watch Regt France

THE BRITISH EXPEDITIONARY FORCE

c/o GENERAL POST OFFICE, LONDON

I will see you at Christmas I hope.

Well we will trust to luck

Dear F & Mother

Just a few lines to you I see by your letter dated the 19th that you have never got the letter in answer to your parcel. Well I have wrote about 50 letters to you. You must not be getting them. It is not for the want of writing. I see you are sending on another parcel. Well it wont half be welcome and thank you. I have written to your every day. Goodnight and God bless you. Your loving son Dave

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A French plain "Carte Postale" addressed to his Dad, Mr David Robertson with Field Post Office stamp dated 8 No 15 (8/11/15) and triangular red censor stamp PASSED BY CENSOR No 2343.

6/11/15 S9365 David E Robertson

8th B Watch B Coy

BEF France

Dear Father & Mother

Jock was wounded through the chest last night. I received your parcel all right and I can assure you I was thankful for it. It was a nice frosty morning and I was doing listening post at the time. We are getting long boots and fur jackets so they will help to keep the cold out. I am listening to the shells tearing over the trenches. I am only 25 yards of the Huns. Hoping you get the pipe all right and thanking Mrs Little for her kindness. Hoping David is all right and keeping well. Well I will close now hoping you are all well. Goodnight and God bless you. Your loving son Dave Love to all. Tell Mrs Little I won't forget her.

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A French plain "Carte Postale" addressed to his sister Annie, Mrs Peter Montgomery, 38 Campie Road, Musselburgh, Scotland with Field Post Office stamp dated 13 No 15 (13/11/15) and triangular red censor stamp PASSED BY CENSOR No 1624.

10/11/15 S9365 David E Robertson

8th B Watch B Coy

BEF France

Love to all

xxxxxx Wee Davie & Jessie and Wee Janet

Dear Sister

I received parcel all right and believe me it was welcome. The pants will keep me warm. Everything was complete in the parcel. Well I am just doing away and trying my best to do my bit. But I miss Jock very much. We used to have our little cracks about home. He got it a little above the heart. I don't know if he got home to Blighty that's Scotland. Well good night and God bless you all your loving bro Dave. I am always thinking about you all.

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A British plain "POST CARD" addressed to his sister Annie, Mrs Peter Montgomery, 38 Campie Road, Musselburgh, Scotland with Field Post Office stamp dated 12 De 15 (12/12/15) and triangular red censor stamp PASSED BY CENSOR No 1624.

Peter is Annie's husband, Peter Montgomery. Jock is David's wounded pal (with the chest wound).

11/12/15 S9365 David E Robertson

8th B Watch B Coy

BEF France

Hoping David Little is keeping well.

Dear Sister

Just a few lines to you hoping you are all well and Mrs Little too and hoping Mother is keeping well and not worrying herself too much. If it is God's will I will come through it all right and see you all again. I wrote to Peter yesterday. It is not easy for me to write to you all hoping you will excuse me. I wish Father would write and tell Jock I got his PC as I have lost his address. He says he is getting on all right and suffering no pain and enjoying himself well. Well I got the two parcels all right and believe me they were welcome. I am always looking forward to a parcel and you have not forgot me. It was very good of George to think of me and I only wish I could get home for Christmas to see him after coming all the way from Canada. Well Annie, I will close now hoping you are all well. I am feeling my back very bad it is very discouraging as we are up to the waist in mud. Well Good night and God bless you all. Love and kisses to Wee Jessie and Davie. God bless them. Your loving brother Davie.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx Wee Janet

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Middle part of letter written on flimsy plain paper, written in pencil. Written to parents Possibly New Year 1915/16 ?

Things have been very lively here. Well I may tell you my back is a little better. Don't worry for I may tell you we are all suffering more or less. I could tell you a lot if I was allowed how we are getting on. I see you had a crack with Jock and he let you see his wound. Well good luck to him that he is better. I miss Jock now although we were never together in the trenches. Jock was never in the firing line yet he never fired a shot yet. He was up to the firing line that night on fatigue when he got it. Well I see you are sending on another parcel and some money. Well I must say I have a good father and Mother. I hope Peter was pleased with his plunge bath he will get one every day if he is spared to come out here. We are in a barn at the time of writing. Well and feeling very warm among the straw thank God for that. But outside on the roads well I am not telling any lies for we are using punts (?) as boats to go along the roads in. They are all flooded. It has rained every day since I came out. There don't seem to be any system of drainage here. It did not stop us from marching through it today up to the waist. The Jocks again they will tackle anything even a pint of beer. Well I may tell you there is one Andrew Ellis. He is going on pass shortly. He will perhaps pay you a visit. He volunteered. I did not ask him so you will get all the news. I wish to God it was me for the sake of seeing George and you all. He will have been about 3 (?) (or 9 ?) years away. Well I will close now wishing you a happy………..

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A French decorated cardboard postcard, the front is delicate chiffon/gauze designed like an envelope with a flap. The flap and envelope are embroidered with brightly coloured silk thread flowers and patriotic flags and bears the legend in light blue embroidery "TO MY DEAR SISTER". Inside is a small card with printed flowers and allied flags with the words "Not absent in thoughts". It is un-addressed and was probably sent in an official envelope. The back of the card has a message in pencil.

It reads:-

To my dear sister not forgetting the bairns wishing you all a Merry Christmas

Dave

For Auld Lang Syne

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Letter written in March 1916 to David's parents on plain paper in pencil. I presume Meg is Margaret, David's wife. Note he now refers to himself as Pte = Private. Did he lose his stripe after all for a while ?

6/3/16 Pte David E Robertson S9365

8th B Batt B Watch B Coy BEF France

Dear Father & Mother

Just a few lines to you hoping you got my last letter all right in the green envelope. I have taken a notion of a pipe any kind will do. There is many a time when you feel hungry and a smoke at the pipe …………. I had a letter from Meg and she was telling me about your kindness to Wee Janet. You and Wee Janet I see are great pals. I wish to God I had the pleasure of seeing her just now. But the time will come round too, if I am spared to see it. And take you my tip I will be a different chap when it is all over. Well I have managed to keep out of the way of the shells and bullets so far and I hope it will be my luck to come through it all safely. But it's a gamble for you can be laughing the one minute and dead the next. I know it is just as bad for you at home for you will always be worrying about me as any good Father and Mother will be. I am always thinking of you. When on sentry at night your thoughts wander home and it makes you think of the past, and what you will do to make up for it when this is all over. Well I met Peter Clarke in the trenches. I have been passing him all the time and didn't know it was him till the other day. You know Peter him that used to be on the beaters (?). He has been out here since the beginning so he has seen something. He is looking well on it too. We were proud to meet each other and we had a chat about old times. He was asking very kindly for Tom. Well Father if you send me any tobacco make it thick black as we can get any amount of the other stuff out here but its no good theres nothing beats thick black. Well we are out here and we don't know as much about it as you know at home about it, but I don't wish to see any more than what we are seeing but everything comes to an end and the time will come when justice will be done. Well I think I will close now thanking you for your kindness to me and not forgetting Annie for she has been good to me and Mother of course. Well Good night and God bless you all Love to Mother keep the home fires burning till the boys come home. From your loving Son Davie.

Davie

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

more barbed wire

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

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Letter written in March 1916 to David's sister on plain paper in pencil. Is is possible atht the "waggity wa" clock referred to is a pendulum wall clock ?

6/3/16 Pte David E Robertson S9365

8th B Batt B Watch B Coy BEF France

Dear Sister

Just a few lines to let you know that I got your letter dated Sunday the 5th and also one from Peter and they were both very welcome. Well Annie I had to sit down. I was laughing that much to myself. You were talking about the changes in George and my memory was going back to the old times when George sat down to dinner of 5 courses and ate none and you used to poke in your nose. Well you know the result. Well these were old times and hope George will not be ill pleased when he reads this. Well Annie it doesn't take much to make me laugh when I look back. Well I was pleased to hear George was attested but I hope the war will be finished before he is ready to come out. It will be good for him and for me also. I wouldn't half worry if he was out here just now. I would be always wondering if he was all right. You were saying Jock was home on Saturday. Well some people are lucky and no mistake. Take it from me Jock did not mean what he said. He never saw any fighting anyway, but good luck to him all the same. We would all be glad of the same chance any time. I got the papers all right and I wish you would send me the Evening Dispatch regular. Its one of the papers I never see. I can get a glance at the other papers but the evening dispatch is better for me. You were saying I will be getting quite an old soldier. Yes Annie I feel quite a Crimean veteran we are all that weary of it. But stick it Jock everything comes to an end. I laughed when you told me about George writing a letter, he used to eat by instalments too. You remember the time when he took back the wagity wa clock. It changed hands a few times. Well Annie I hope I get the parcel all right and I hope there will be some Blighty fags in it if I am spared to get it. If not some other body will. Peter sent me quite a nice letter and I will answer it as soon as possible. Peter is one of the best. Well Annie when you are out on listening post here you can lie and listen to the Germans whistling all the tunes Scotch ones at that and one of them plays a clarinet regular. He will stop playing some of these times in a hurry if things land in the right place. Well Goodnight and God bless you all. Love to Father and Mother. Kisses to the bairns.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

barbed wire

xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

your loving Bro Dave

write often even if I don't write back because we cant always find time so just keep on writing . We have had a few days snow and it is a fine scene.

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George Robertson, David brother, who came back from Canada to join up. He joined the RAMC and is seated front left (as you view it).

post-60205-0-94222200-1300883497.jpg

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Peter Montgomery - Peter in David's letter and Annie's husband. He was a piper in the 2/7th Batt Royal Scots (there is also a separate thread I posted on this battalion in the Units forum.

post-60205-0-81620900-1300883748.jpg

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Letter written undated to David's sister on plain paper, written in pencil. Probably early 1916.

Pte David E Robertson S9365

Note the address

Dear Sis

Just a few lines to you while I have time to write. I may tell you I have never received the parcel you and Mother sent on yet. Well I have sent two letters to Peter I hope he got them all right. He sent me a very nice letter. I also sent one to Tom but he has never written yet. You never say in your letter how Wee Jessie and Davie are doing for I always thought a lot of them. I never forgot any of them they are always in my mind. You might send me on a photo or two if you can manage as I would like to see their faces. I wish George would write to me and send me one of his photos as I have little chance of seeing him otherwise. Well the weather is looking a little better thank God and you can hear the birds singing away. But the roar of the guns spoils the music. Well it's glorious to listen to all this uproar of guns and other weapons of war all day and all night continually but they have an awful meaning every time one of them speaks for you know what it means especially to the man in the trenches as the gunners a good bit behind stand a better chance than us. I expect David Little will be still safe. He is all right dont worry. Well I expect Peter wont be long in coming over now seeing he is in England now. Well I hope I will have the pleasure of meeting him if he comes here. You can let Father and Mother know about the parcel. Well I think I will close now. Love to all Goodnight. Your loving Bro Dave.

Kisses to the bairns

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx Jessie

barbed wire

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx Davie

Keep the home fires burning. Theres a silver lining in the dark cloud shining

Love to Mother

Write often Ta Ta

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Tom Robertson RE, David's brother

post-60205-0-26758100-1300884085.jpg

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Letter written in March 1916 to David's parents on plain paper in purple pencil. I'm confused about the sixpence and matchbox story. The "Musselburgh DCM" is presumably a Musselburgh man who won the DCM. I can't find reference to this award – it may stand for Distinguished Conduct Medal.

17/3/16 Pte David E Robertson S9365

Note the address

Dear Father & Mother

Just a few lines to let you know I got your kind and very welcome letter. Also the pipe and tobacco and handkerchief and also the lucky sixpence in the match box. I gave my mate the box with the sixpence but he returned it to me or I wouldn't have known. Well I don't know how to thank you for your kindness to me. I will never forget it. I may tell you the other parcel has never turned up yet. Well we cant help it. I have met Jamie Johnston here. He is in the RE's as a sapper. Well you and Wee Janet must be great pals. I would give the world to see you all just now. Wee Jessie will be a firm playmate for her. I will tell Peter Clarke you were asking for him very kindly. Well Mother you will be sorry about the parcel but we cant help it. Well I don't know if I will be spared to see this through but its not for the want of plenty good wishes from you all at home. I smiled when I read Maggies letter. She was telling me about the Musselburgh DCM and I am to try and be the next one. Well I may get one if I am lucky enough to get the chance of an opportunity. But I may tell you that there has been many a VC and DCM won that has never been noticed. There are things done here every night between the lines that are deserving of it any time, and it has to be done whether your nerve is good or not. It's the only way to put the fear of death in them, and the only way to end this war. It's a nerve racking business and we wonder when it will all end. I note what you say that it will be a happy home coming. I wish the time was here now it will be great. We will all go half mad. But it's a long way to look forward, but theres nothing like it for keeping up your heart. I am always looking to the bright side of things and hope for the best. We are fighting for a good cause and that gives you some fighting spirit. We can all see now what it would have been if they had gained a footing. They have used all the dirtiest methods of war fare unimaginable. The gas is the most fearful. Its something to dread I may tell you. But cheers it will end sometime. Well Good night and God bless you all for your kindness. Goodnight Mother Cheers Your loving Son Dave

Love to all

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx to the bairns

At night time when you show the last (?) light you get hell for your pains. My mate and me are doing cook this week for our platoon and we are making a good job of it too. Its not easy under shell fire you dare not show any smoke.

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Letter written in April 1916 to David's parents on YMCA paper headed "On Active Service WITH THE BRITISH EXPEDITIONARY FORCE" and written in purple pencil.

26/4/16 Pte David E Robertson S9365

8th Batt B Watch B Coy

BEF France

Note the address

Dear Father & Mother

I am sorry I could not write you sooner. We have been very busy. My hair has stood on end a few times these last few days. I would like to tell you my experiences these last few days. But I cant say any thing here. Some queer thoughts flash through your mind some times. This is a terrible experience to have. Well as you know by the papers there will be some terrible dirty work done this summer and the sooner the better for everybody concerned. I may tell you my nerves are a little unstrung. Its no joke to be knocked deaf for half an hour by a shell exploding near you. I got all your letters all right including one from George which I will answer if I am spared. Well you will perhaps not get a letter from me for a day or two so don't be surprised as the good weather is here now and the busy times. Well I will close now. Goodnight Give Mr Downie my kind regards. God bless you all. Love to Mother

Your loving Son

Dave

xxxxxxxxxxx to the bairns

Cheers

Have just received your photos my heart filled when I seen them.

The "terrible dirty work done this summer" is a reference to the impending Somme Offensive which began on 1st July 1916. The 9th Scottish Division, including the 8th Black Watch, took part in the First Battle of Albert in the first week of July 1916, though was not engaged in the disastrous 1st July attack. However, in the next phase, the Battle of Bazentin, 9th Scottish attacked and captured Longueval village, a key strongpoint, on 18th July.

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Letter written in December 1916 to David's parents on plain paper, written in pencil.

19/12/16 Pte David E Robertson S9365

8th Batt B Watch B Coy

Dear Father & Mother

Just a few lines in answer to your most welcome letter and I also received the fags and I may tell you they are splendid. You were saying Peter was home and expects to be out here shortly. Well I hope he will be spared to come through it all as I know if anything were to happen to him or George it would knock the heart out of me. George has no pinch of a job for the RAMC had their work cut out for them at the -------. I might meet him out here, but he might be sent some other where. Well I don't know when I will be home, there are about 12 in front of me and they are letting 2 away every four days perhaps sometimes so will have an idea when I will be home. I would have liked to have my leave at the New Year for the sake of seeing George as it is only a stroke of luck to meet him out here. I expect you will know where I am by now.Well I will close now. Good night and God bless you all. Your loving Son Dave

xxxxxxxxxx to the bairns

and a Happy New Year to you all. Hoping you get the Xmas cards all right. Ta Ta Cheers

The blanked reference in the RAMC sentence was made by David and no doubt refers to The Somme George was at that time with the RAMC based at Curragh Camp, Ireland. I don't know if he went to the Western Front.

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Latter part of letter written undated to David’s Mother & Father on flimsy plain paper, written in pencil. Probably December 1916 ?

I got the parcel with the scones today. -------unreadable sentence follows--------. New Year and see and enjoy yourselves and don’t worry about me. If its my turn to go under well I wont be the only one.Thousands of sons have went before. This country is just a fair grave yard. The Kaiser has a lot on his head. Well Goodnight and God bless you all and I hope Geordie you will enjoy yourself while you are home.I would like fine to see you. I am fair uplifted now that you have been home to see the old folks at a good old time. I wish I could drop in the same way at 12 on old years night. Well I am contented considering. All I can say is I am one of the boys Goodnight your loving Son Dave. Ive not got Mrs Littles letter yet.

Xxxxxxxxx to the bairns wishing them a happy New Year and Mrs Crandles.

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This is a photo of "Wee Davie" from the letters, David Montgomery, son of Annie (Robertson) and Pte Peter Montgomery (2/7th Royal Scots)

post-60205-0-45017700-1300905630.jpg

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This class photo shows "Wee Jessie", Jessie Montgomery, sister of David, daughter of Annie & Peter Montgomery, Davie Robertson's niece. In good old family tradition, Wee Jessie is marked with an "X" . This photo may have been taken a little after David Robertson's death.

post-60205-0-34779300-1300905793.jpg

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Postcard sent by David Robertson Snr (David's father) to Pte George Robertson RAMC (his son and David's brother) in July 1917, after David's death. He asked George to visit David's grave if he was to be sent to France. What Mr Robertson Snr couldn't have known was the David did not have a grave, other than a mass grave. He is mentioned on a panel of the Arras War Memorial.

post-60205-0-85204000-1300906170.jpg

post-60205-0-45114900-1300906186.jpg

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Thanks very much for sharing that Lachlan. Very interesting, and enjoyed reading it. Appreciate the effort you have put into the thread.

Cheers Mike

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