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Jacky Platteeuw

Rugby men

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Jacky Platteeuw

Has anyone some more information about following entries in Menin Gate register possibly when they played on what position and other statistical things.

MOBBS, Lieutenant Colonel, EDGAR ROBERTS, D S O, 7th Bn. Northamptonshire Regiment. Killed in action at Zillebeke 31st July 1917. Age 37. Son of Oliver L. and Elizabeth Anne Mobbs, of Northampton. Former England International Rugby Football player. Panel 43 and 45

MILNE-HENDERSON, Lieutenant, JAMES YOUNG, Mentioned in Despatches, 11th Bn. Highland Light Infantry. 31st July 1917. Age 26. Son of John and Ina Young Milne-Henderson, of 15, Merchiston Park, Edinburgh. A Watsonian and an International Rugby Footballer and member of the Madras Rugby team. Junior, East of Scotland Swimming Champion. Works Manager to McVitie and Price, Ltd., Willesden, London. His brother, John also fell. Panel 38

Thanks

Jacky

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Guest Hill 60
MOBBS, Lieutenant Colonel, EDGAR ROBERTS, D S O, 7th Bn. Northamptonshire Regiment.

Jacky - I suggest you contact Kate & Martin Wills, they're a mine of info when it comes to the Northants :D

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Dolphin

Lee

I've been collecting information of Rugby internationals who served in the War for some time now. Summaries of the careers of the two men you mentioned follow.

James Young Milne Henderson (sometimes Milne-Henderson) played as a scrum-half from Watsonians RFC for Scotland v England at Twickenham in 1911. (England won 13-8).

He was killed in action as a Lieutenant in the 10th/11th Battalion, Highland Light Infantry [46th Brigade, 15th (Scottish) Division] on the opening day of the Third Battle of Ypres. An Irish international player, Capt A S Taylor, RAMC attached to the 10th/11th HLI, was killed on the same day.

Edgar Roberts Mobbs DSO played as a wing and centre from Northampton RFC for England in 7 Internationals: v Australia, Wales, France, Ireland and Scotland in 1909 and v Ireland and France in 1910. He scored tries in his first, third, fourth and fifth matches.

In 1914 he was refused a commission due to his age (32) but enlisted as a private and went on to raise his own unit - 'D' Company of the 7th Northamptonshire Regiment. By July 1917 he had been promoted to Lieutenant Colonel and commanded the 7th Northamptons [73rd Bde, 24th Division]. He had been awarded the DSO, as well as being wounded and mentioned in despatches.

Lt Col Mobbs was killed in action on 29 July 1917 at Zillebeke, while attempting to bomb a machine gun that had trapped a detachment of his battalion.

I hope this helps.

Dolphin

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Conor Dodd

Are there any photos of rugby internationals who served in the war around ???

Conor

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Guest Hill 60

Dolphin - Thanks for the info (although it was Jacky who wanted it :rolleyes:).

Wasn't there a memorial to Mobbs somewhere in Northants? And did I read somewhere (maybe one of Kate's postings on the old WFA Forum?) that there is still a rugby match played in his honour?

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Conor Dodd
An Irish international player, Capt A S Taylor, RAMC attached to the 10th/11th HLI, was killed on the same day.

There is an Irish paper of the time that gives alot about Rugby players it could be useful for him.

Conor

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Terry_Reeves

The Museum of Rugby in conjunction with the CWGC are staging an exhibition at Twickenham called "Gone But Not Forgotten -Rugby's War Dead" which remembers the sacrifice of players during the two world wars. The exhibition closes on April 27th.

The Rugby Football Union web site also has an interesting introduction to the exhibition. Of the players who took part in the last Scotland/ England match before the outbreak of war, it notes that " both captains, a number of forwards and the majority of backs never returned from WW!."

Terry Reeves

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CROONAERT

The CWGC has published an information sheet (free) entitled "Commemoration of Commonwealth - Sportsmen and Women". This gives a potted biography of two international rugby players - Jacky Morkel (Springboks) ,died 1916 and David Gallaher (All Blacks), DOW 1917.It also mentions John Raphael (England).There is also a photo of four members of the present All Blacks visiting David Gallaher's grave.

Dave.

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Raster Scanning

Jacky.

There is a paperback book called "Mobbs Own" (I think). It describes Mobbs life and goes on the provide info on the formation and subsequent military service of the unit raised in his name. I do have a copy but not here in Brunei.

John.

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Dolphin

Lee (this time it is you - sorry for the error last time)

The commemorative Mobbs Memorial match between East Midland and the Barbarians has been played in Northampton since 1921*, becoming an annual fixture in 1923. In 1924 a bust of Edgar Mobbs was unveiled at the north end of Northampton's Market Square.

* The 1921 match was refereed by former England International A D Stoop [15 caps] who had served as a Captain in Mesopotamia with the Queen's (Royal West Surrey) Regiment. He mistakenly blew for full time after only 68 minutes. After spectator protests, the teams returned to the field for the Barbarians to win 19-14.

Dolphin

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Jacky Platteeuw

Youre just GREAT mates. Simply the best.

Jacky

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Guest Hill 60

Dolphin - Many thanks for the info. It's only a short drive from MK to Northampton so I'll have to pop over and see this memorial.

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Paul Reed

Jacky - our mate John has the Mobbs book in the Shell Hole. The Mobbs family came to the reading of his name at the Gate last July; they were staying the Novotel with us while we were walking the Salient.

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Kate Wills

Jacky

Edgar Mobbs’ is a local legend here in Northampton. Our population was around 95,000 in 1914, and of the many thousands who participated (3,000 never to return) Mobbs is far and away the most illustrious. Its is not simply his bravery (plenty of others displayed that) or his sporting achievements (including England captain), but his determination (from the initial ‘Thankyou, but no…’ to Lt Col no less) and the pride and care he displayed for ‘his’ men that marks his hero status here. He was a useful cricketer too, once being dubbed ‘The Olney Jessop’. It really is Boys’ Own stuff. Many’s the time I have heard the phrase “he was with Mobbs” uttered with great pride by relatives who served with him.

In 1914 he had recently retired from rugby and was working at the Market Harborough branch of the family firm The Pytchley Autocar Company. At his last Saints (Northampton RFC) dinner, the chairman made a speech in which he suggested that now Edgar had retired perhaps he could find time to produce another similarly talented generation for Franklin’s Gardens. Within a year the world had changed, and the chairman’s good-hearted hopes would be dashed at Passchendaele. Hearing of the loss of officers from the walking wounded, he decided to lead the battalion from the front, and left his HQ in Canada Street Tunnels to take charge in Shrewsbury Forest. In company with a runner, he located the position of a machine-gun at Lower Star Post, but was soon mortally wounded in the neck. Before dying he wrote a note and sent his runner back with instructions. To quote the battalion history “ The fact that his body could not be recovered and buried, as all ranks would have wished, was perhaps a good thing, as it helped keep alive his memory in the battalion, and inspired in everyone the resolve to avenge his death and to end the war that had already caused so much misery and suffering.”

The Mobbs memorial, which includes a bronze bust of our local hero, flanked by panels in which a rugby match transforms into a battle, was moved from the Market Square in the 30s, and Edgar Mobbs now fixes his gaze upon the names of the 3,000 other Northampton men on the town war memorial on Abington Square. This is the scene of a remembrance ceremony enacted every year, prior to the Mobbs Memorial Match, played between East Midlands and The Barbarians. Since its inception, and until recently this was one of the prime selection matches for international honours. Sadly, one of the downsides of the new professionalism is that the match has been downgraded, as so many players need resting after the Six Nations tournament and the arduous domestic season.

To close, Northampton’s bus fleet is named after local people and places, and Edgar's name is borne around town on one of our double-decker buses emblazoned ‘Lt.Col. Edgar Mobbs DSO’

Lee -

Mobbs Memorial is opposite the main war memorial in Abington Square. This is not to be confused with the Lutyens-designed Town & County Memorial Garden at the rear of All Saints Church, which due to its position near the Guildhall is the focus for civic ceremonies, such as the Remembrance parade. I wouldn’t want you wandering around Northampton on your own, talking to strangers!

You will find another thread called Rugby Players (December 2002) with a number of entries on Edgar.

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Kate Wills

I was going to suggest (and Jacky’s post gives us an ideal cue for doing so) that if anyone is interested in joining us for the next Mobbs Memorial Match, how about a Forum-users gathering? We could attend the wreath-laying at midday, amble down to The Fish for a good pub lunch and a dose of real ale, then go on to Franklin’s Gardens for the match.

EAST MIDLANDS v BARBARIANS

Wednesday 21st May 2003

at Franklins Gardens, Northampton

Kick off - 3.00 pm

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Guest Hill 60
Lee .... I wouldn’t want you wandering around Northampton on your own, talking to strangers!

Kate - That is exactly what the judge said at my last court appearance :D.

Seriously, thanks for the info. I would have gone to the other memorial (which is quite impressive) and missed Mobbs' memorial.

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Dolphin

Kate

I'd love to be at the wreath-laying, the pub and the match, but 17000 km is a long way to go, even for Rugby!

Please tender my apologies.

Dolphin

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Kate Wills

Dolphin

Convert it to good old imperial measurement and it won't seem so far!!

Hope to meet you sometime.

Kate

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Terry_Reeves

Kate

Are you sure a drink before the match for forum users is a good idea? I have this vision of the local nick being full of trench coats. Might just join you and Martin depending on commitments.

Terry Reeves

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MartinWills

Terry,

We were proposing a bite to eat as well!

Martin

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Terry_Reeves

Martin

Phew! Thank heavens for that.

Terry Reeves

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Roy Evans
There is a paperback book called "Mobbs Own" (I think). It describes Mobbs life and goes on the provide info on the formation and subsequent military service of the unit raised in his name.

Jacky

Ray Westlake Books have copies of this book @ £7.95

Roy

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Adrian

Player biographies may be found in The Complete Who's Who of England Rugby Union Internationals (Raymond Maule, 1992).

Don't forget either players like Ronnie Poulton Palmer, apparently one of England's best ever and related to the Palmer family of Huntley & Palmer biscuit fame.

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Kate Wills

Pals,

31st July 2007 marks the 90th anniversary of the opening of the Battle of Passendaele, and death in action of Lt Col Edgar Mobbs DSO. I am proud to announce that Northamptonshire WFA is staging the inaugural Edgar Mobbs Memorial Lecture this coming Thursday, 12th July, given by Jed Smith, curator of the Museum of Rugby at Twickenham. His subject is 'Rugby Players in the Great War'.

On Sunday 29th July, we will assemble at the Mobbs Memorial for a short ceremony of remembrance dedicated to Edgar and the men under his command who also lost their lives that day, whose names will be read by attendees.

All welcome to both events.

http://www.northamptonsaints.co.uk/32_4565...9f537df7a80040b

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Stebie9173

I will be there this time ! (for Thursday I mean).

I should also be available for early evening tiffin. Will it be at the usual establishment?

Steve.

P.S. Sorry, if you lugged the Jack Warner biography in last time for naught. Can you bring it in this time, pretty please?

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