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PhilB

WW1 photos

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Ribble

Anne001

The original book I refered to will be long out of print, I'm afraid. There is a tiny reprint of the still on page 62 of Paul Reed's 'Walking the Somme' (Pen & Sword).

In the meantime I have been scouring the internet trying to find it - this is the best I could come up with but it has been very tightly (and poorly) cropped and is either earlier or later in the film sequence than the frame I'm referring to and doesn't have the same impact.

post-8-1110924323.jpg

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Guest TanyBryn

Photographs of the desolate battlefields, without soldiers or the dead. Showing just the destruction and the terrible conditions that these poor men saw, lived in and fought over everyday.

They speak silently of the utter destruction man can inflict.

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AndyMacdonald
A "larrikin" in NZ is a bit different,

more disapproving- a child who is "a bit of a brat" often grows up to be a larrikin, who does things that sober sedate people disapprove of, things verging on criminal.

I think Aussies admire this free-spirited type of person more than NZers do

I never believed the NZ meaning larakin to be any different to the Australian. This after growing up in NZ. I always understood the the Australians embraced the characteristic as part of their culture, whereas it was just another noun in NZ. Certainly, it has no correlation with 'a bit of a brat' whatsoever. I don't even believe it has any negative connotations in NZ. But there you go, we all have our opinions, for what it's worth.

Andy M

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Ozzie

A larrikin is a name I would wear with some weird sort of pride.

Someone who pushes the envelope with humour and good nature, who doesn't quite follow the norm, but searches out their own way.

The larrikin in the group is the one, who when the chips are down, will bring up marale, put a smile on the face of the most dour, and pull the most outrageuos stunts and get away with it.

There is one in every crowd.

Cheers

Kim

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Stephanie

There is one picture that I saw in the Sanctuary Woods museum, in a little box, of a nearly skeletal horse stuck in a tree..

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Arras100

Thought I would add to this collection, a picture that has always haunted me.

hellerp25.jpg

It evokes the words...

"Does it matter?—losing your sight?...

There’s such splendid work for the blind;

And people will always be kind,

As you sit on the terrace remembering

And turning your face to the light."

~ S. Sassoon

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Malte Znaniecki

After the german gas-attack of April 22nd 1915

040811162740nj3.jpg

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PhilB

Just a thought, S. The gassed soldiers seem to have very pale boots. Photographic effect or did gas discolour leather? Phil B

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Arras100

QUOTE (Phil_B @ Mar 3 2007, 08:13 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Just a thought, S. The gassed soldiers seem to have very pale boots. Photographic effect or did gas discolour leather? Phil B

Very interesting question...and since I'm no expert on photographs or gas, my educated guess would be it's the way the photograph was taken...perhaps the lighting? What do you think?

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Bryn

Photo captioned "Dead Turks one year after Romani"

post-854-1173184224.jpg

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Arras100

Bryn, this is a very disturbing photograph to look at.

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Bryn

It certainly is. Not much romance about being left to rot in the desert.

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AJP1963
G'day

This particular photo 'spooks' me. It seems to be featured in almost every book and exhibition of 'general' 1st AIF involvement. It is included in the "stills" video at the Hooge Crater Museum, and is actually the overprinted background to a travel brochure for an official Flanders booklet. I had been familiar with it for many years before becoming aware that Jackie would have been processed at that spot at about the time the photo was taken. Most reproductions of the picture spare us the haunting statement. "Shortly after this photo was taken a shell exploded killing most of those on stretchers".

ooRoo

Pat

The AWM reference is B4260.1

Location is variously shown as Hooge, Birr Cross Roads or The Culvert

Battle of The Menin Rd

20/09/1917

This photo made me cry as it was taken on the very same day my great uncle died

thankyou though for giving me another link to him

Regards Andy

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John Rice

After looking at the photo's, is it any wonder that most returned soldiers didn't wish to speak about the sights that they had seen during the war

The soldier with the smile on his face in death was very moving.

John

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auchonvillerssomme

Lots of comments about how we feel when we see these pictures of 90 years ago. Are they any more thought provoking and horrific than the ones we see every day in the media?

Mick

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