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Huddersfield Roll of Honour Plaque


P. J. Clarke
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Some time back (2006-2008) i sought information on a Sergt. James Convey (Convoy) who captured a German flag (banner) and hoped to display it in Huddersfield where he lived (native of Ballina, Co. Mayo). On November 2nd, 1918, a memorial ceremony was held to inaugurate a Roll of Honour Plaque fixed to the wall on Dock Steet at Turnbridge, Huddersfield. This named 82 surviving men who had enlisted plus a further 16 who had been killed. The organisers were Sergt. Harry Convey, DCM, possibly his brother, John Convey, and a Luke Galvin. This memorial was removed when the area was demolished and has since disappeared. I intend to go to Huddersfield around St. Patrick's Day and would love to visit the grave of Henry Convey; to visit Dock Street and look at the photographs in the Drill Hall, plus a visit to the Huddersfield Examiner. Can anybody help locate Harry's grave? Here's hoping. PJC.

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P,

May be something you have already considered, but what about contacting the local cemeteries office for the area of Huddersfield where you believe this man to have lived? I have found these bodies (no pun intended) to be enormously helpful.

It is reasonable to assume that he will have been interred close to his place of residence.

Just an idea.

Good luck,

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Just a little extra info...

I could only find one death in the name of 'Henry Convoy' (could find nothing for Convey), and this occurred in 1926 (age 47) and was registered in the district of Huddersfield. Likely to be the right chap, and therefore Huddersfield seems the most likely place of burial - unless he was cremated. But then again, cremations were not as common in 1926 as they are today, of course.

I would imagine tracking down somebody with this reasonably unusual name won't be too tricky.

Cheers,

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Just a little extra info...

I could only find one death in the name of 'Henry Convoy' (could find nothing for Convey), and this occurred in 1926 (age 47) and was registered in the district of Huddersfield. Likely to be the right chap, and therefore Huddersfield seems the most likely place of burial - unless he was cremated. But then again, cremations were not as common in 1926 as they are today, of course.

I would imagine tracking down somebody with this reasonably unusual name won't be too tricky.

Cheers,

His name is Henry Convey who was born in Shamble Street, Ballina, the same street, and probably a next door neighbour of James Moyles, grandfather of Chris Moyles. I would like to point out that James Moyles had a brother-in-law called John Flynn who, along with his five brothers all fought and returned home after the Great War ended. There was a photo of William Flynn snr., ex-Connaught Ranger and his six sons, all in uniform, in the Daily Sketch. It was a unique photo, now lost here in Ballina. I would like to point out that through the courtesy of the late Jackie Clarke, Ballina, that it was he who gave me James Moyles' Memorial Plaque for an exhibition of World War 1 documents that I was putting on in Ballina. As Jackie said: "I have a present for you" and handed me the plaque -- the first I'd ever seen or handled. While researching "Mayo Comrades of The Great War" I got to know James Moyles daughter, and on her birthday I presented her with her father's plaque, which she idolised until her death. I'd also like to point out that James Moyles' son, William, also took part in the Great War, but this was not mentioned in the programme. James' three medals are with another grandson in England. I checked the 1901 and 1911 Census here but I can't find Henry's name, so maybe he was in England then. If what you say that he died in 1926, aged 47, would he have served in the Boer War and returned to Ireland? PJC

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In 1901 Henry ConvOy is a Private in the Irish Guards based at The Guards Depot The Barracks, Caterham

Born 1879 (= 47 in 1926) in Ireland.

In 1911 Henry ConvOy in married to a Mary Ann (1876, Huddersfield, Yorks) with two children, Thomas (1907) and Catherine (1908) - both born in Huddersfield - and is employed as a Mason Labourer, living at 2 Dock St Huddersfield. Dob is now 1876, Mayo Ballina Resident.

in 1911 there is also a John ConvEy, a Widower employed as a Filler at a colliery lodging at 14 Annerby St Denaby Rotherham with the Dagnell family. He was born 1862 in Mayo, Ireland.

Hth

Grant

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In 1901 Henry ConvOy is a Private in the Irish Guards based at The Guards Depot The Barracks, Caterham

Born 1879 (= 47 in 1926) in Ireland.

In 1911 Henry ConvOy in married to a Mary Ann (1876, Huddersfield, Yorks) with two children, Thomas (1907) and Catherine (1908) - both born in Huddersfield - and is employed as a Mason Labourer, living at 2 Dock St Huddersfield. Dob is now 1876, Mayo Ballina Resident.

in 1911 there is also a John ConvEy, a Widower employed as a Filler at a colliery lodging at 14 Annerby St Denaby Rotherham with the Dagnell family. He was born 1862 in Mayo, Ireland.

Hth

Grant

Thanks Grant, I appreciate your fine effort. PJC.

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Kirklees Bereavement Services(Huddersfields Local Authority) are based at Riverbank Court Aspley Huddersfield.They have all the registers there am not sure if its a free look up service though although you have narrowed it down and hopefully have the right guy.

http://www.kirklees.gov.uk/answers/deathandbereavement/bereavementService.shtml#gravesearch

Unbelievable £21.00 ! To search.

Ady

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Thanks Grant, I appreciate your fine effort. PJC.

Reading a newspaper Item in the Huddersfield Examiner from 8th February, 2008, (which is online) I came across this interesting item: "New Home for Plaque Honouring the Dead". A memorial plaque honouring First World War dead from Paddock is to have a new home. The ceramic plaque is to be displayed in the Army Drill Hall on St. Paul's Street next to Huddersfield University and close to the town centre. The Paddock Memorial had always been at All Saints Church on Church Street and remained there when the church was bought as a home by David Aveyard in 1985. A Mr. John Shaw, whose grandfather got killed at the Somme on 1st July, 1916, in conjunction with Dorothy Firth or Mirfield and Geoff Ashton from Salendine Nook (also grandchildren) organised the move to the drill hall. It cost £500 to renovate the plaque." There is more on this story by Andrew Hirst of the Huddersfield Examiner, and I was wondering if this is the same plaque that Father McCartney paid 25 shillings for? From what I can gather from the story there is a list of names on it. Any good soul from Huddersfield would have a peek and tell us on the Forum about it. Best wishes to all. PJC.

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Paddock is on the other side of town from Dock Street. The little church at Paddock was turned into a house and the memorial from there moved to the Drill Hall.

There is - or used to be - a Mr. John Rumsby working at Tolson Museum who had some sort of responsibility for the memorials in the councils care in this area. He is also involved with the Huddersfield Military History Society. So far as I know, the Dock Street Memorial disappeared from the Flint Street Depot, but I have no other details.

Huddersfield Military History Society

Tolson Museum

Tony.

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Paddock is on the other side of town from Dock Street. The little church at Paddock was turned into a house and the memorial from there moved to the Drill Hall.

There is - or used to be - a Mr. John Rumsby working at Tolson Museum who had some sort of responsibility for the memorials in the councils care in this area. He is also involved with the Huddersfield Military History Society. So far as I know, the Dock Street Memorial disappeared from the Flint Street Depot, but I have no other details.

Huddersfield Military History Society

Tolson Museum

Tony.

Thanks Tony: Will email both organisations with my query, and you never know . . . . PJC

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Some time back (2006-2008) i sought information on a Sergt. James Convey (Convoy) who captured a German flag (banner) and hoped to display it in Huddersfield where he lived (native of Ballina, Co. Mayo). On November 2nd, 1918, a memorial ceremony was held to inaugurate a Roll of Honour Plaque fixed to the wall on Dock Steet at Turnbridge, Huddersfield. This named 82 surviving men who had enlisted plus a further 16 who had been killed. The organisers were Sergt. Harry Convey, DCM, possibly his brother, John Convey, and a Luke Galvin. This memorial was removed when the area was demolished and has since disappeared. I intend to go to Huddersfield around St. Patrick's Day and would love to visit the grave of Henry Convey; to visit Dock Street and look at the photographs in the Drill Hall, plus a visit to the Huddersfield Examiner. Can anybody help locate Harry's grave? Here's hoping. PJC.

Hi everybody

Just a bit more info on Sgt James Convey *Convoy)

Included in the list of Military appointments published in the supplement to the “London Gazette,” on Wednesday evening is the following:-

Sergeant H. Convoy, 1/5th Battalion. Lives 2, Dock Street, Huddersfield. He is a married man and has served 3 years in the Irish Guards. In August 1914 he applied to rejoin his old regiment, but at the request of the military authorities he join the Huddersfield Territorials. In November last he was over in Huddersfield on leave and left for the front again on November 15th. He was wounded in the side by a shell whilst on his way back to the trenches and he is now in hospital at Downhill, Harlow, Essex. (Awarded the D. C. M.)

(The Huddersfield Examiner Friday 14/01/1916)

Hope it's of some use. Kindest Rgards DaveC

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Hi everybody

Just a bit more info on Sgt James Convey *Convoy)

Included in the list of Military appointments published in the supplement to the "London Gazette," on Wednesday evening is the following:-

Sergeant H. Convoy, 1/5th Battalion. Lives 2, Dock Street, Huddersfield. He is a married man and has served 3 years in the Irish Guards. In August 1914 he applied to rejoin his old regiment, but at the request of the military authorities he join the Huddersfield Territorials. In November last he was over in Huddersfield on leave and left for the front again on November 15th. He was wounded in the side by a shell whilst on his way back to the trenches and he is now in hospital at Downhill, Harlow, Essex. (Awarded the D. C. M.)

(The Huddersfield Examiner Friday 14/01/1916)

Hope it's of some use. Kindest Rgards DaveC

Nice one, Dave C. The puzzle is coming together. PJC.

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Hi: While searching through my records I came across, and how I overlooked this, mystifies me, the death of Pte. Michael Convey, No. 4179, 2nd Battn. Connaught Rangers, aged 19, son of James and Sarah Convey, Shambles Street, Ballina, Co. Mayo. Michael died of wounds on the 28/10/1914. He is Remembered with Honour in Ypres Town Cemetery. Grave ref.: H.A. 53. He was a brother of Henry Convey.

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  • 1 year later...

Reading a newspaper Item in the Huddersfield Examiner from 8th February, 2008, (which is online) I came across this interesting item: "New Home for Plaque Honouring the Dead". A memorial plaque honouring First World War dead from Paddock is to have a new home. The ceramic plaque is to be displayed in the Army Drill Hall on St. Paul's Street next to Huddersfield University and close to the town centre. The Paddock Memorial had always been at All Saints Church on Church Street and remained there when the church was bought as a home by David Aveyard in 1985. A Mr. John Shaw, whose grandfather got killed at the Somme on 1st July, 1916, in conjunction with Dorothy Firth or Mirfield and Geoff Ashton from Salendine Nook (also grandchildren) organised the move to the drill hall. It cost £500 to renovate the plaque." There is more on this story by Andrew Hirst of the Huddersfield Examiner, and I was wondering if this is the same plaque that Father McCartney paid 25 shillings for? From what I can gather from the story there is a list of names on it. Any good soul from Huddersfield would have a peek and tell us on the Forum about it. Best wishes to all. PJC.

The Geoff Ashton you quote could have been my uncle by marriage. He was a very keen family researcher and lived at Quarmby.

On the topic of the Examiner. I am trying to see if they have any archived records of local men taken POW, but it look like they only have on line stuff from 1970 onwards.

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  • 1 year later...
Guest ginaogorman

With regard to the relationship between sergeant Henry convey DCM and pet Michael convey - Michael was Harry's nephew , his father James and Harry were brothers. If anyone has discovered where Harry is buried I'd appreciate the info .

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In 2008/2010, I was allowed entry into the Drill Hall at Queen Street and met up with the Adjutant of the of the Drill Hall which was the spiritual home of the 5th Battalion.

He allowed me to take photo's of the Roll of Honour of the 5th, he mentioned to me that in the near future they where installing the Roll from a defunct building I thought he said it was from the 2nd Battalion.

Cheers Roger.

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  • 5 months later...

There is an H Convoy on the Roll of Honour in the Irish Club Fitzwilliam St Huddersfield. This commemorates all the members of the Club who served in either WW1 or WW2. In 1916, the log book of St Patrick's school records that Sgt H Convoy DCM visited the school and heard the children sing. Other log book entries refer to Old Boys visiting the school so possibly he too was an ex-pupil.

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  • 7 years later...
On 07/12/2010 at 20:28, P. J. Clarke said:

His name is Henry Convey who was born in Shamble Street, Ballina, the same street, and probably a next door neighbour of James Moyles, grandfather of Chris Moyles. I would like to point out that James Moyles had a brother-in-law called John Flynn who, along with his five brothers all fought and returned home after the Great War ended. There was a photo of William Flynn snr., ex-Connaught Ranger and his six sons, all in uniform, in the Daily Sketch. It was a unique photo, now lost here in Ballina. I would like to point out that through the courtesy of the late Jackie Clarke, Ballina, that it was he who gave me James Moyles' Memorial Plaque for an exhibition of World War 1 documents that I was putting on in Ballina. As Jackie said: "I have a present for you" and handed me the plaque -- the first I'd ever seen or handled. While researching "Mayo Comrades of The Great War" I got to know James Moyles daughter, and on her birthday I presented her with her father's plaque, which she idolised until her death. I'd also like to point out that James Moyles' son, William, also took part in the Great War, but this was not mentioned in the programme. James' three medals are with another grandson in England. I checked the 1901 and 1911 Census here but I can't find Henry's name, so maybe he was in England then. If what you say that he died in 1926, aged 47, would he have served in the Boer War and returned to Ireland? PJC

I can confirm that the Flynn family lived on Shamble St., as the brothers  sent postcards to their father William at this address. I have a marriage cert for Annie Kate, John's daughter marrying Thomas Moyles, son of James in 1930.

AnthonyIMG_20210831_133519.jpg.22a35bfc2145defec9cb72f6a7bee600.jpg

Edited by Anthony466
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Sgt. Henry CONVOY, 242027, 2/5th Leicestershire Regt. - 2 Dock St, Huddersfield, discharged 31.12.17 - Widow: Mary Ann at same address [looks like he died first half of 1926, potentially April]

From disability and widow's Pension Cards at WFA/Fold3

:-) M

Edit: This rather look like his death registration at GRO

Name:                                     Age at Death (in years):  

CONVOY, HENRY                    47  

GRO Reference: 1926  J Quarter in HUDDERSFIELD  Volume 09A  Page 379

Edited by Matlock1418
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