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Remembered Today:

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trenchtrotter
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23 minutes ago, ALAN MCMAHON said:

   But the problem with that  is that  the war  clamped down on the activities of UK photographers as many of the chemical products needed came from Germany and disappeared  in 1914 under the terms of the trading with the enemy legislation. There was some respite because enemy property confiscated included German patents, which enabled some replacements. through home production.

     I mention this only because the photographic materials supplier, Ilford Limited, laid off a number of women and youth employees in 1914 due to shortages of chemicals- and a significant misjudgment that the war would depress the market for photographs.  Among the lads laid off was one named John Travers Cornwell..........

That’s very interesting Alan, it’s amazing then just how many photos still managed to get taken.  Of all the things I might guess that John Cornwell did a photographer’s assistant wouldn’t have been one of them.

Edited by FROGSMILE
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Hi,

in Germany it was common to have a photo taken when released from active service. The local photographers had especially made cardboards to address the occassion. Photos were also taken during exercises or manoeuvres at their special maneuvre-facilities that every Armeekorps had and of which some still exist today, like Munster. Photographers liked to open studios in close vicinity to the barracks, as the soldiers were bound to be potential customers. On the CDVs back you quite often find mention of the proximity to barracks. And then there where photographers who specialised in photographing large manoeuvres likev the Tellgmann familiy who catered for the officers class, mainly. They were appointed photographers to the court of Wilhelm II because of their pictures.

GreyC

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30 minutes ago, ALAN MCMAHON said:

  I believe he was actually a delivery boy for Ilford Limited.  He must have worked subsequently, as his RN record card has him as a "brewer's boy", though I cannot recall seeing reference to which brewery.

     It seems a pity that more enquiries have not been made to trace the glass plate stocks of High Street photographers.  And the more so when the plates have a number and the print is now of an unknown-as with Ebay  all day every day.   It makes the loss of identity  of these prints all the more poignant when they have that tantalising plate number on them.

Yes what a treasure trove of information that  would have been.  What with that and the loss of the Arnside Street records it’s amazing that anything at all can sometimes be uncovered.

There was the amazing find a few years back of the hundreds of glass plates in an old French farmhouse attic that by some miracle survived two world wars.  As they were a local endeavour by an amateur making money as a sideline, there was no organised serial numbering, but they have provided a fantastic visual record of faces of British and Dominion soldiers.  The results have been published in a large table book and since then have been the source of focus for various enthusiasts of computer based digital colourisation.  An amazing melding of old and new visual technology. 

Edited by FROGSMILE
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6 minutes ago, ALAN MCMAHON said:

 It makes the loss of identity  of these prints all the more poignant when they have that tantalising plate number on them.

Maybe a soothing thought, that most negatives were only kept between 1/2 year and two years and then discarded or recycled (the chemicals were washed off and the glassplate reused either for photographic purposes or as glass-tile in greenhouses. Only few studios had the capacity to store the negatives 5-10yrs, especially the busy ones.

GreyC

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4 minutes ago, GreyC said:

Hi,

in Germany it was common to have a photo taken when released from active service. The local photographers had especially made cardboards to address the occassion. Photos were also taken during exercises or manoeuvres at their special maneuvre-facilities that every Armeekorps had and of which some still exist today, like Munster. Photographers liked to open studios in close vicinity to the barracks, as the soldiers were bound to be potential customers. On the CDVs back you quite often find mention of the proximity to barracks. And then there where photographers who specialised in photographing large manoeuvres likev the Tellgmann familiy who catered for the officers class, mainly. They were appointed photographers to the court of Wilhelm II because of their pictures.

GreyC

That’s interesting GreyC and it demonstrates how international the business of photography was and is.  Germany was so much a leader with the development of chemicals for so many emerging modern processes like photography and dyeing.  I recall those large training areas that you describe very well and can imagine the photographers who must have operated around Munster, Soltau, Sennelager and suchlike.

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55 minutes ago, charlie962 said:

We could do with an update on the project re this Lewes Sussex photographic archive. They have the ledgers as well. 

https://www.greatwarforum.org/topic/232867-portrait-photographs-then-and-now/#comment-2321411

Yes that would be great Charlie, there doesn’t seem to have been anything heard since. 

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On 14/10/2022 at 13:36, FROGSMILE said:

 The demand became prolific and a lot more photographic studios set up to meet that.  Especially given conscription and the largest army that Britain has ever put into the field.

Aldershot Photographers in 1911.

I've looked through Kelly's Directory for Hampshire & Isle of Wight, 1911 & found these photographers in Aldershot.

See attached file.

I've added names found on the backs of some photos.

Kath.

More from Backs of photos.

Broadway Studio, Gordon Rd, Aldershot.

 Imperial Studios, 47 Union St.,Aldershot.

Union Jack Studio Aldershot
 

ALDERSHOT photographers 1911.jpg

Edited by Kath
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57 minutes ago, Kath said:

Aldershot Photographers in 1911.

I've looked through Kelly's Directory for Hampshire & Isle of Wight, 1911 & found these photographers in Aldershot.

See attached file.

I've added names found on the backs of some photos.

Kath.

ALDERSHOT photographers 1911.jpg

That’s a big list from just one garrison town Kath. Imagine how many there must have been in London!

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Captioned Signals Day, Haynes Park and appears to show some men dressed in captured German uniforms along with fake wounds and exaggerated 'German' features. Possibly some sort of mock show battle? Haynes Park was a Royal Engineers Signal Training Camp half way between Bedford and Luton in Bedfordshire.

 

91531233_2629142544020612_210134268549005312_n.jpg

Edited by Raster Scanning
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Lt Hett sits with his 7th Bedfordshire Regiment men, under training in Spring 1915. Haslemere.

68556257_2423573387910863_1203476542445846528_n.jpg

Company Quarter Master Sergeant J Davies 551st Field Company, Royal Engineers at Bedford, April 1917. Note the horse has been branded with the Government Property arrow

54435221_2318999691701567_7774730360197218304_n.jpg

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Unveiling the War Memorial at Ampthill, here is The Princess Beatrice, Queen Victoria's youngest child, who was guest of honour. Interesting to see an early news reel cameraman was present.

49212581_2274032362864967_5954178695055802368_n.jpg

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Research reveals this was Pte. 152 William Gillibrand of the 1/4th Battalion (TF) who died 30th April 1915. He was from Chorley. His coffin is escorted to Bedford Station on his way home. His Death Certificate shows he died from a perforated ulcer.

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23549943_2011481752453364_8782293001488399896_o.jpg

23800314_2017711958497010_1935505217616122970_o.jpg

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8 minutes ago, Raster Scanning said:

Lt Hett sits with his 7th Bedfordshire Regiment men, under training in Spring 1915. Haslemere.

68556257_2423573387910863_1203476542445846528_n.jpg

Company Quarter Master Sergeant J Davies 551st Field Company, Royal Engineers at Bedford, April 1917. Note the horse has been branded with the Government Property arrow

54435221_2318999691701567_7774730360197218304_n.jpg

Super photos, thank you for sharing them.  I especially like the group.  It’s relatively unusual to see drab puttees worn with scarlet home service frocks.  There’s a shortage of insignia with only a few wearing collar badges and several without cap badges too.  Also the front row are showing their military inexperience by folding their arms, something that in a regular army unit would generally only be done by sports teams.

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21 hours ago, Kath said:

Aldershot Photographers in 1911.

I've looked through Kelly's Directory for Hampshire & Isle of Wight, 1911 & found these photographers in Aldershot.

See attached file.

I've added names found on the backs of some photos.

Kath.

More from Backs of photos.

Broadway Studio, Gordon Rd, Aldershot.

 Imperial Studios, 47 Union St.,Aldershot.

Union Jack Studio Aldershot
 

ALDERSHOT photographers 1911.jpg

Here is one by Scovell

33637120_2107727982828740_2625782811084193792_n.jpg

Edited by Raster Scanning
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In photographs such as the 6th Bedfords platoon, above, I always enjoy the evident pride some men took in their badges of rank or skill - the sergeant seated second left is clearly pleased with his stripes. They appear to be on his right arm only - a result of initial shortages amongst the Service battalions battalions? Or a standard practice? In this case the stripes look rather new maybe it was a hasty recognition of a new promotion. Anyway, a great snapshot - I wonder how the men portrayed fared in the years to come.

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2 hours ago, Pat Atkins said:

In photographs such as the 6th Bedfords platoon, above, I always enjoy the evident pride some men took in their badges of rank or skill - the sergeant seated second left is clearly pleased with his stripes. They appear to be on his right arm only - a result of initial shortages amongst the Service battalions battalions? Or a standard practice? In this case the stripes look rather new maybe it was a hasty recognition of a new promotion. Anyway, a great snapshot - I wonder how the men portrayed fared in the years to come.

Yes it’s noticeable how he’s self consciously positioned his right arm isn’t it.  A lot of soldiers tend(ed) to do that I have noticed.  In that fellow’s case it might be a shortage of stripes, but then I’d expect to see more than just him in that situation.  Regulation stated both arms on service dress.  One thought is that he might be a lance sergeant and the one arm intended to distinguish that status, but there was nothing in regulations to support that as a convention. 

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7th Bedfords in very informal attire in the summer of 1917. Even though this PC is badly damaged I love this picture. The man on the right in the middle is 33496 Pte. A E Harrison. He was killed in action on April 4th 1918. I include some of his papers as an example of why it is not a good idea to hold important documents together with sellotape or similar.

image.jpeg

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92660071_2637654769836056_3330861057760559104_n.jpg

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5 hours ago, FROGSMILE said:

.  One thought is that he might be a lance sergeant and the one arm intended to distinguish that status, but there was nothing in regulations to support that as a convention. 

That's an interesting possibility, Frogsmile - I do suspect the Service battalions were sometimes less scrupulous in their observances than Regular ones, so (if that's true) it's certainly plausible. It has the feel of a good workaround, at least.

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3 hours ago, Pat Atkins said:

That's an interesting possibility, Frogsmile - I do suspect the Service battalions were sometimes less scrupulous in their observances than Regular ones, so (if that's true) it's certainly plausible. It has the feel of a good workaround, at least.

Yes I think your assessment outlines the likely scenario.

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On 13/10/2022 at 10:22, Jerry B said:

1st Welsh RAMC T, sent by Private James Smethurst, 6/8/1911, includes some boxers.  Address to Mrs Smethurst whom he calls Dear Friend

welsh ramc f wm.jpg

 

as a follow on, a new card from 2nd WELSH RAMC, this time dated just after the start of the war.  Lots of interesting details, posted to Cardiff from Frank to his mum and dad

welsh ramc 2nd bn f wm.jpg

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On 17/10/2022 at 17:54, Jerry B said:

as a follow on, a new card from 2nd WELSH RAMC, this time dated just after the start of the war.  Lots of interesting details, posted to Cardiff from Frank to his mum and dad

Thanks for sharing. 

I see there are a couple of ASC (TF) men with bandoliers, presumably they are there for the horses. Although the RAMC were unarmed presumably the ASC men were, hence the bandoliers. 

I had previously posted about an ASC man in the 2nd Welsh FA RAMC here. I am the custodian of his Trio & TFEM. 

 

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On 20/10/2022 at 13:13, Alan24 said:

Thanks for sharing. 

I see there are a couple of ASC (TF) men with bandoliers, presumably they are there for the horses. Although the RAMC were unarmed presumably the ASC men were, hence the bandoliers. 

I had previously posted about an ASC man in the 2nd Welsh FA RAMC here. I am the custodian of his Trio & TFEM. 

 

thanks and thanks for sharing your insight and the medals

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On 17/10/2022 at 17:54, Jerry B said:

as a follow on, a new card from 2nd WELSH RAMC, this time dated just after the start of the war.  Lots of interesting details, posted to Cardiff from Frank to his mum and dad

welsh ramc 2nd bn f wm.jpg

Thank you for sharing such an excellent photo Jerry.  I think it shows especially well several features including the Red Cross arm badge of RAMC other ranks, several Imperial Service tablets, some grubby canvas fatigue suits intended for dirty work likely to soil uniforms, and even a soldier with a fixed collar shirt and braces kneeling in the centre.  As per usual a glass plate image that delivers great details.

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