Jump to content
The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Remembered Today:

Postcards


trenchtrotter
 Share

Recommended Posts

I am saying

1. that the badges appear to be WO I, and

2. that this is compatible with being a RSM and

3. that you appeared to think not.

Sorry if I misunderstood.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am saying

1. that the badges appear to be WO I, and

2. that this is compatible with being a RSM and

3. that you appeared to think not.

Sorry if I misunderstood.

Ah ok - I was going by the earlier identification of the chap in question whilst in ordinary SD as a Sergeant Major as likely being indicative of his (then) lower status, the change to Officer quality SD and Sam Browne is usually quite suggestive of being a cut above the rest!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

John,

Fantastic images of men from 74th Yeomanry Div. Middle East till May 1918 then France. Will check the cap badges. Only other image I have ever seen of this patch. I have a PC of a MGC chap with badge.

TT

1/12 Loyal North Lancs....pioneers.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Mounted MGC 74th Yeomanry Div.

TT

post-15846-022084900 1287332246.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Can anyone tell me what the pin is above the pocket button? I see the same on a group photo of my GF's battery but only one man has one. I can't seem to reduce the size of my photographs to only 100kb in order to post them - is there a magic trick I'm unaware of?

Harry's brother. Pte John Irvine Hargraves 7th Bn West Yorks.

Died of pneumonia from the result of being gassed 15/11/18. Etaples .

Jack_Hargraves_04-h.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

At a guess I'd say it was the end of a fob watch chain. Is it me, or does his pocket seem to have a lump in it?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Its alovely image of a West Yorks. Nice waterproff top to cap. The pin will be a fob chain for watch, whistle, locket, keepsake. Remember the wrist watch did not exist before WW1.

TT

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Can anyone tell me what the pin is above the pocket button? I see the same on a group photo of my GF's battery but only one man has one. I can't seem to reduce the size of my photographs to only 100kb in order to post them - is there a magic trick I'm unaware of?

Most likely a pocket watch or a locket on a chain.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Snap,snap,snap.....

TT

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A few more to add - again forum members may remember these from previous posts of mine!

Firstly my gg uncle Horace George Parnell, who served as Gunner 97820 in the Royal Field Artillery during the First World War until his death on 27th June 1916. He served on the Western Front with 5 Battery, 45 Brigade RFA, 8th Division (he had previously served with the RFA from 1893 to 1911).

This photo was taken in High Wycombe, sometime between September 1914 and the end of August 1915. (To my knowledge the only RFA units there at the time were batteries of the newly formed 21st Division.)

post-2839-0-31290600-1407091761_thumb.jp


All the best

Steve

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My late stepmum's uncle Launcelot Charles Victor Andrews, who served as Private 45052 in 11th Battalion Suffolk Regiment; he died of wounds at 61st Casualty Clearing Station on 17th October 1917 (see my recent post here).

In this photo of Launcelot in uniform, curiously his cap badge is that of the Bedfordshire Regiment. After helpful suggestions from fellow forum members (and a lot of digging!), it seems likely that here Launcelot is in training with 52nd (Graduated) Battalion Bedfordshire Regiment in early 1917.

post-2839-035603000 1287348205.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My late stepmum's dad Robert George Andrews. Robert served as Private 49149 with 3rd Battalion Rifle Brigade from July 1918 till early 1919. Here we see him in the latter part of 1919, wearing his BWM and VM ribbons, serving as Private 64767 in 16th Battalion King's Royal Rifle Corps. (You can just about make out his two[?] overseas service chevrons on his right forearm.)

post-2839-068038400 1287348620.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

One of Robert's chums (I have no name for him unfortunately), presumably also of the 16th Battalion KRRC. This chap has two(?) overseas service chevrons and a single wound stripe.

post-2839-097425900 1287349146.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Another one of Robert's pals (again sadly I don't have a name for him), this time a young Lance Corporal of the KRRC (possibly either 25th or 16th Battalion).

post-2839-055700200 1287349430.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Frank Treen, a Keighley lad, sadly KIA.

Lance Corporal, 8th Bn., Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment). Service No: 12013.

Age: 26. Date of Death: 21st August 1915.

Son of Edward and Mary Elizabeth Treen, of 12, Pickles St., Keighley, Yorks.

HELLES MEMORIAL, Panel 117 to 119.

Treen_Frank-front-small.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Remember the wrist watch did not exist before WW1.

Not true I'm afraid - I've seen an advert from 1912 for wristwatchs. And in searching Wikipedia, it would appear a chap called Patek Philippe was making wistwatches as early as 1868. They were by no means as popular as pocket watches for men (being considered effeminate) until the war years proved their worth, but they certainly existed:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Watch#1920.E2.80.931950_Wristwatches_become_popular

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patek_Phillipe

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Anonymous group - but a nice title.

They all seem to be wearing GS buttons as badges except the Sgt who has a badge - it appears to be a rearing horse - perhaps Royal West Kents or Kings (Liverpool)? but the scroll doesn't look correct for either.

post-14525-070364000 1287365296.jpg

Chris

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Anonymous, damaged but every time I look at this picture I wonder....

post-14525-021924900 1287365747.jpg

:poppy:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not true I'm afraid - I've seen an advert from 1912 for wristwatchs. And in searching Wikipedia, it would appear a chap called Patek Philippe was making wistwatches as early as 1868. They were by no means as popular as pocket watches for men (being considered effeminate) until the war years proved their worth, but they certainly existed:

http://en.wikipedia...._become_popular

http://en.wikipedia..../Patek_Phillipe

have a look at post #212, appears to be wearing watch & dated photo

regards

Bob R.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

have a look at post #212, appears to be wearing watch & dated photo

further the post "A Few of the Best' , fellow sitting in middle with no great coat appears to be wearing a watch also??

regards

Bob R.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Another of the 13th batt.west yorkshire regiment at Rugeley camp in 1916. grandfather first on the left,front row.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...