Jump to content
The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

A Bunch Of Likely Lads! The Wreckers


HarryBettsMCDCM
 Share

Recommended Posts

I am just wondering if any Pal has come across this RAF sub~Unit Before~Taken by a Photographer:A.Gazard,2 Shayer Road;Shirley,Southampton,They all appear to be in post 1918 RAF Uniform,but it is the moniker that intrigues me? what or who were "The Wreckers",They do look a likely lot! & most have WW1 Ribbons up,any suggestions would be helpful? :blink:

The Wreckers

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Pete Wood

In my day, a 'wrecker' was a vehicle used by Recovery Mechanics (Recce Mecs) to tow broken-down heavy vehicles and plant machinery.

The term wrecker, as used by the post-war forces, was obviously derived from an earlier time.

So I wonder if these chaps were 'breakers' who were in the salvage/recovery business....??

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In my day, a 'wrecker' was a vehicle used by Recovery Mechanics (Recce Mecs) to tow broken-down heavy vehicles and plant machinery.

The term wrecker, as used by the post-war forces, was obviously derived from an earlier time.

So I wonder if these chaps were 'breakers' who were in the salvage/recovery business....??

Thanks RT Sounds very plausible,I note one is wearing Overalls,so I would imagine its something in that area .

Cheers Roger.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

OK, shoot me down for proposing this, but:

In 1906 Dame Ethel Smythe (a composer remembered more for her militant Suffragette activities than her music) wrote an opera called The Wreckers, which was first produced in Liepzig, then received an number of concert and staged performances in England before the war. The story concerns a group of villagers in Cornwall who lure ships onto the rocks to plunder the cargoes.

OK, I said it was fanciful...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

OK, shoot me down for proposing this, but:

In 1906 Dame Ethel Smythe (a composer remembered more for her militant Suffragette activities than her music) wrote an opera called The Wreckers, which was first produced in Liepzig, then received an number of concert and staged performances in England before the war. The story concerns a group of villagers in Cornwall who lure ships onto the rocks to plunder the cargoes.

OK, I said it was fanciful...

Sounds wonderful a bunch of RAF "Erks" acting like Sirens a luring the Navy onto the Rocks @ Lee On Solent,to plunder the vessels ~ I Like It! :lol:

It could well be where the name came from though,thank You Kate

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just a guess, but I think RT might be on the right track.

Massive amounts of equipment, including brand-new aircraft, were reduced to scrap after the War, ie they were wrecked. Someone had to do it, and perhaps those people were known as 'Wreckers'.

A post-War photograph of DH-9s awaiting possible sale, or probable destruction, is below.

Cheers

post-2-1086638199.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...