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centurion

Knock knock

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centurion

Found this labelled as being during the Easter Rising! The tank is a Mk V and the date will be mid 1918 or later.

post-9885-1273684980.jpg

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Sidearm

This illustrates the use of tanks in Ireland to force entry to buildings as I described in another thread.

Gwyn

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centurion
This illustrates the use of tanks in Ireland to force entry to buildings as I described in another thread.

Gwyn

Hence the title I gave this thread

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Martin Bennitt

I'd be surprised if it was Knock, though. More like Dublin

cheers Martin B

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Sidearm
Hence the title I gave this thread

And I thought it was a pun on Knock too! :lol:

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archangel9

They only wanted a fresh loaf.....

http://www.jmob.ie/

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BrendanLee

They are not knocking down the door, that's the days bread ration being passed into the tank and as we all know real men don't eat sliced pan.

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corisande

They probably though that they could get more than the two loaves allowed

During the week of the Easter Rising, food shortages became a major problem in the city. Bread was in short supply, especially with Boland's mill in the hands of the rebels. However, the bakery of Johnston Mooney & O'Brien was still operating, and according to The Irish Times, "persons were supplied with only two loaves each, at the ordinary price, and there was a good deal of humour in the spectacle of staid and important professional men walking home with loaves in their arms. At times there was a good deal of mischievous crushing at the bakery door, and some persons suffered from it."

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west coast

flour and bread rations.

mike.

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Steven Broomfield

Typical. There are always a couple of loafers on the street corner.

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Paddy 60th
This illustrates the use of tanks in Ireland to force entry to buildings as I described in another thread.

Gwyn

So thats where 'ram raiders ' got the idea from !!

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johnny_doyle

Paul Walsh seems to write a bit on armoured cars and tanks in Ireland and indicates on another forum that the 17th (Armoured Car) Battalion, Tank Corps was stationed in Dublin (with a foray to Limerick). C Company appears to have been equipped with Mark IVs and later Mark Vs.

http://www.dorsetrarebooks.co.uk/genealogy/17th-tank.htm

In Fighting for Dublin by Martin Sheehan, giving the British side of activities during the War of Independence, there's a note to say that

"one section of 4 male Mark V Star Tanks were available throughout 1920 and 1921...... On several occasions tanks were used in support to Infantry and armoured cars.....The majority of bridges in and about Dublin will not carry heavy tanks."

In the composition of DUblin District Dec 1920 to July 1921, Sheehan records the following under Tanks :

No 5 Armoured Car Company (less 2 Brigade Peerless sections) - Marlborough Barracks

1 "RR" Section - Dublin Castle

1 "P" Section, RASC - Royal Barracks

but no mention of the 17th Battn. There is a nice section re "Battalion Standing Orders for Armoured Cars in Ireland"

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Ken Devitt

153 Capel Street, Dublin circa 1920. The building is still there and is now a bistro. The building to the right (Murphy's) is gone.

Ken

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tipperary

Today

post-23909-0-22239600-1336671222.jpg

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