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johnewright

No 6 MAC

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johnewright

I am looking for information on No 6 Motor Ambulance Convoy, which I understand that this was part of 324 (?)

My Grandfather served in this unit in France from March 1915 until August 1917, so any help on where it served and/or which units it was attached to would be useful.

Thanks,

John

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themonsstar

324 Company ASC, Formed 9th March 1915,Disbanded 2nd July 1919, theatre of war ,Western front, 3rd Army, role in war 6th Motor Ambulance Convoy (MT) War Office file number at the NA Kew= WO95/410

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johnewright
324 Company ASC, Formed 9th March 1915,Disbanded 2nd July 1919, theatre of war ,Western front, 3rd Army, role in war 6th Motor Ambulance Convoy (MT) War Office file number at the NA Kew= WO95/410

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johnewright
324 Company ASC, Formed 9th March 1915,Disbanded 2nd July 1919, theatre of war ,Western front, 3rd Army, role in war 6th Motor Ambulance Convoy (MT) War Office file number at the NA Kew= WO95/410

Thanks for your help. Sorry about the previous slip, I am still getting the hang of this!!

John

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r larkin

6 MAC/324 Coy ASC was formed following the offer by Arthur du Cros MP of an ambulance convoy to the Secretary of State for India on 7 October 1914. The establishment of the company was completed on 29 December 1914 but due to illness didn't depart Grove Park until 5 February 1915 and sailed from Avonmouth on ss Twickenham for Rouen on 6 February. It arrived at Rouen on 10 February and immediately moved to Hazebrouck and Bailleul. At the end of July 1915 it was based at Corbie and moved to Les Alencon in February 1915. In May 1916 it moved to Leavillers in readiness for the Somme, where Beauval seems to have been the base after July. During July 1916, it carried 11834 patients. On 17 June the company moved to Wippenhoek and then became part of the 'Pool' based Red Farm, Vlamertinghe

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johnewright

Thanks for your responses - Grandfather IGW joined up in January 1915 and the crossing to Rouen ties up with his records. We know that he was part of a group that published a unit newsletter 'The Jackdaw', copies of which we got from the British Museum.

His record card and the London Gazette confirm that he was awarded the Military Medal - but we do not know why. Can anyone point me in the direction of where I may be able to get this information?

Thanks,

John

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Ron Clifton

Hello John

As you have probably already found out, the London Gazette does not give any citations for MM awards, but there may be a reference to it in the War Diary, in file WO95/410 at the National Archives (see an earlier post). War Diaries rarely mention men by name other than officers, but sometimes there are references to men winning the MM or other awards, especially in smaller units, which includes MACs.

You should be ready to go back around three months (or perhaps even more if it is an award from 1918) from the date of the Gazette entry.

Gook luck!

Ron

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Judy S

I am also trying to trace My Granddad Charles H Hicks RASC M2/031800 enlisted WW1 23rd Dec for duration of the war. Granddad was sent to France early 1915, was a driver for the 6th Motor Ambulance Convoy, I never met my Granddad he passed away 2 years before I was born. I am trying to trace Granddads path. I have acquired some of his papers via Ancestry when I was a member.

Can anyone please advise/direct me on how I can buy a diary which im hoping will trace his divisions movements please.  I am in Australia & have no idea as to what im to ask for nor who im to request for a copy from..........

Would so appreciate if someone out there can advise me on my next steps. PLEASE

 

Oh Yes & Thank You for the information already up on this page re 6th Motor Ambulance Convoy............So helpful to me..........

Cheers Judy S 

Edited by Judy S
missed some info..........

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Ron Clifton

Hello Judy S, and welcome to the Forum!

 

I think that the War Diary of 6 MAC, file WO95/410, is now available to download online from www.nationalarchives.gov.uk for about £3.50. I don't know if you can pay via PayPal or similar but the website should tell you more about this.

 

Good luck,

 

Ron

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Judy S

Thank You Ron Clifton, 

 

Im not computer savvy however my granddaughter is so I will gat her to help me.

 

I appreciate your information

 

Cheers Judy S

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TEW

There are two diaries for 6MAC;

 

Here

 

and here

 

£3.45 each

 

TEW

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Ron Clifton

Judy

 

TEW's links both seem to lead to the same section, Jan 1915 to March 1917. According to the full catalogue, the full diary covers the period to June 1919, so I suspect WO95/410/2 may cover the period from April 1917 onwards.

 

Apart from 6 MAC, the file also seems to contain the diary of 16 MAC (569 Company ASC). I don't want to raise your hopes too much, but this suggests that the diaries may be fairly comprehensive.

 

Ron

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Judy S

 TEW & RON,

 

THANK YOU both ever so much I will try to the full diary. So nice of you both, Appreciate your assistance.

 

I will start delving into the information.

 

Granddad Hicks was sent to France 10th Feb 1915 so want to track his path.

 

Thank You AGAIN

 

Judy S

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Wswilly3

My grandfather JAMES GANT (born 1889, Altrincham, Cheshire) was a driver in 6 Motor Ambulance Convoy and his number was M2-021182 and he was a private and his commanding officer was Colonel Eliot W Skinner. He was a chauffeur driving a Rolls Royce near Altrincham, Cheshire before WWI and enlisted on 2/12/1914 and after training at Grove Park, London embarked from Avonmouth aboard the Twickenham on 6/2/1915.

 

I have his original diary of the voyage and his initial service but it is relatively short, as he was himself gassed on 1/5/1915 at the 2nd Battle of Ypres and was hospitalized in Belgium and then England before being discharged from the Army on 31/5/1915. He never fully recovered from the gassing and was always an invalid and died in 1925 aged 36 years old.

Extracts from the diary of James Gant : February to March 1915 on travelling to and then serving on the Western Front

 

Enlisted Dec 2 1914.

 

Left Grove Park 5 Feb 1915. Stayed night at Marlborough, had to sleep in cars, poured rain all night. Had no rations all day. Left Marlborough for Avonmouth at 6am on Feb 6th. Had no breakfast and feeling very cold and hungry. Arrived at Avonmouth at midday in a drizzle rain. Got our cars on board the SS Twickenham and left at 9 pm Saturday 6th Feb for Havre.

 

Sunday 7th at daybreak we were off Lundy Island. Rough sea and most of our men sick, me as well. Sailed down coast of Devon and Cornwall, rather misty and could not see land very well. 

 

Monday 8th Feb 1915. Sailed round by Lands End and reached Lizard about dark.

 

Tuesday 9th. Arrived at Havre, had to be put all night, no berth for boat, pretty town, several gunboats in harbour. Saw a steamer sunk which had been torpedoed.

 

Left Havre Wednesday 10th for Rouen, sailed up the River Seine. Scenery was magnificent villages all the way up, everybody waving flags, quite pleased with our reception on French soil. Reached Rouen at 3pm same day. Had to sleep on board as our cars were not unshipped.

 

Thursday 11th. Cars all taken of ship to a long avenue lined with trees on the banks of the river. Slept in the cars, could do with my own bed but getting used to roughing it. No bread only biscuits . I bought bread off Chinese crew on board, a lot of thieves and rouges. Meet several of the Indian troops in Rouen. Very poor opinion of French army but think a lot of our Tommies. They were just leaving again for the front. Beautiful cathedral at Rouen. France seems very quiet you cannot think you are as near to the war. Very few men anywhere. Had no wash for 2 days.

 

Friday 12th Feb. Good rations today, first since left Grove Park. Cars inspected by Col Skinner, chief of Ambulance staff. Hospital train arrived loaded up with wounded. Afternoon lovely, got leave today visited cathedral, street very narrow and dirty. A lot of widows going about.

 

Saturday 13th.  Pouring down with rain.

 

Sunday another wet day, nothing to do, still stuck on the banks of the river.

 

Feb 19th left Rouen pouring down with rain for Blangy. Camped on Market Square. Over boot tops in mud.

 

Feb 20th. Left Blagny for Abbeville. Stopped for dinner lined up in Market Square. More mud, stayed the night.

 

Feb 21st. Left Abbeville for St Omer, stopped at Fronges for lunch, passed Flying Corps base on estuary. St Omer also British soldier’s graves.

 

Monday left St Omer at 2-30 for Hazebrook, arrived at 5pm. Had to go on guard. Heard the guns for first time, bitter cold night.

 

Tuesday 23rd Feb . Got letter and box from home. How cheering for me to have some cigs.

 

Wednesday 24th . Received second letter with 5 shillings which was needed badly. Wrote home and to friends.

 

Feb 25th . Went on guard , poured all night.

 

Feb 26th Inspection of cars finished. Received letter from Mother, very cheering.

 

Feb 27th  Just been inoculated. Very painful.

 

Feb 28th. Nothing doing after inoculation.

 

March Ist  Kitchen fatigues getting the mess food ready. Nothing doing beautiful day.

 

March 2nd   Stand by waiting for cases.

 

March 3rd  Wet day. Nothing doing. One of our men died in hospital through night.

 

March 4th  Received one box and letter from Mary when I was on guard, rotten day.

 

March 5th Came off guard, asked for transfer , would not give it me. Went for our march

 

March 6th Getting ready for army up country. Wrote home and Mrs Richardson. Received box from home. Had to go up to the front quick way.

 

March 7th Ordered to Billiul, 4 miles of tunnels, very heavy firing all day shook all windows in the town. Went up to the firing line with two soldiers.

 

March 8th Went to Locre for six men, very bad cases. Locre is in Belgium.

 

March 9th Went to Nieppe and Armentieres for wounded and then to Dixdebusch

 

March 10th Went to Dixdebusch for wounded

 

March 12th To Dickebosch for more wounded.

 

March 14 Heavy shelling day and night. Fetching in the wounded all night. Some awful sights. Working in the region St Eloi and Neuve Chapelle where 17000 German were killed. 

 

March 15th   Came back for a rest.

 

March 16th   Nothing doing

 

March 17th.  Went on guard

 

March 18th. Nothing doing.

 

March 19th. General Porter came and inspected us. Met young Hocknull the taxi driver.

 

March 22nd  Three English men shot as spy.

 

March 28th  Two generals dismissed from army.

 

 

 

 

This was the last entry and he was gassed on 1/5/1915 at the 2nd Battle of Ypres and had to return to England.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

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DLT

Hi just read your post, how sad for your Grandfather, i notice his number was M2-021182, i am currently scanning old postcards that belonged to my grandmother and her sisters, i have one dated 02-05-1915 and was sent to her from "Shrimpey" he put his number on the card M2-021180, only 2 digits away from your Grandfather, could it be that they signed up at the same place to get these numbers or did the numbering not work like that? the return address on the card was for  No 6 Motor Ambulance Convoy, i wonder if any of your grandfathers letters mention anyone called Shrimpey? i would like to find out who he was and if he survived the war, have you any advice how to find out his real name from his Army number? i purchased the War Diary pt 1 but that just reports what they were doing not who was doing it, any help much appreciated.

1915-3-2a.JPEG

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Michelle Young

Hello DLT and welcome. The person who posted the message you replied to hasn't  been on forum for nearly two years. Once you have made two posts , you can try private messenger.

 

Michelle 

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pjwmacro
22 hours ago, DLT said:

have you any advice how to find out his real name from his Army number

 

Welcome to the forum DLT. Possibly private William H Gardiner Royal Army Ordnance Corps. Who I think survived the war.

 

Regards, Paul

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pjwmacro
On ‎05‎/‎04‎/‎2017 at 15:50, Wswilly3 said:

being discharged from the Army on 31/5/1915.

 Pension record for M2-021182 is avail on Fold 3 (I don't have) - but confirms James GANT b Altringham Cheshire in 1889 and gives discharge date as 19 Sep 1916.

Regards, Paul

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pjwmacro
On ‎13‎/‎02‎/‎2019 at 16:09, DLT said:

have you any advice how to find out his real name from his Army number?

 

@DLT Pretty sure that Private William H Gardiner Royal Army Ordnance Corps is NOT "Shrimpey". Gardiner's MIC is under the number 021180 (No M2/) and he did not qualify for a 1914-15 Star, so was not in France by Feb/Mar 15 - as Shrimpey was. Frustratingly I cannot find a MIC or an entry on the medal roll for M2/021180 of the Army Service Corps. You might wish to try starting a separate thread under the "Soldiers" topic - giving what you do know - and seeing if somebody with better search skills than mine can come up with something.

 

Regards, Paul

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