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reuchlin09

Military training of 1916 leaders

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reuchlin09

A question which has always interested me is where did the leaders of the Rising such as Countess Markievicz, P. Pearse, J. Connolly, E. de Valera etc. receive their military training and who provided them with their officer uniforms? I wonder does anyone have information on this.

DanielO

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BrendanLee

James Connolly served in the British Army for nearly 7 years, served most of his time in Ireland with a short spell in India. Constance Markiewicz was the daughter of an Anglo-Irish family and was an excellent shot, recognized as one of the best snipers during the Rising.

The Irish Citizen Army (ICA) had been in existence since 1913 and the Irish Volunteers (IV) also formed in 1913 were both uniformed organizations. There was no official uniform for the Rebels during the Rising, uniform ranged from none to ICA, IV, or a combination of ICA mixed with IV and also British Army uniform which was readily available. Officers who could afford it would have their own uniforms made by one of the many Dublin tailors that is why many of the uniforms varied in style.

Many of the leaders such as de Valera and Pearse had no formal military training, Many of the Rebels received training while members of Fiann Eireann which was founded in 1909 and although described as Boy Scouts they did receive training in 'Musketry' which involved rifle drill and shooting.

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reuchlin09
James Connolly served in the British Army for nearly 7 years, served most of his time in Ireland with a short spell in India. Constance Markiewicz was the daughter of an Anglo-Irish family and was an excellent shot, recognized as one of the best snipers during the Rising.

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The Irish Citizen Army (ICA) had been in existence since 1913 and the Irish Volunteers (IV) also formed in 1913 were both uniformed organizations. There was no official uniform for the Rebels during the Rising, uniform ranged from none to ICA, IV, or a combination of ICA mixed with IV and also British Army uniform which was readily available. Officers who could afford it would have their own uniforms made by one of the many Dublin tailors that is why many of the uniforms varied in style.

Many of the leaders such as de Valera and Pearse had no formal military training, Many of the Rebels received training while members of Fiann Eireann which was founded in 1909 and although described as Boy Scouts they did receive training in 'Musketry' which involved rifle drill and shooting.

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reuchlin09

Thanks for the information. I really wondered how these leaders mangaged to conduct their siege operations with so little training.

Daniel0

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kildaremark

"I really wondered how these leaders managed to conduct their siege operations with so little training."

Many would argue that they didn't - they seized the wrong buildings, poor tactics and would probably have gone down in history as another failed event except that the British executed them and sent the prisoners off to a concentration camp for 2 years indoctrination and training. The mobilization order got messed up with the result that most Irish Volunteer units throughout the country did not come out. If the mobilization had gone correctly, someone had thought to blow up train lines to slow troop movements, blow bridges etc, the Rising would have lasted a signifcantly longer length of time.

The only real "success" was at Mount St. Bridge where a poorly trained or lead Sherwood Forest unit demonstrated what a few well placed snipers can do.

Mark

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irishmen1916

As far as I know McBride, Mallin and Connolly all had some training, Mallin and Connolly in the BA, and McBride with the Boers in S.Africa.

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centurion
As far as I know McBride, Mallin and Connolly all had some training, Mallin and Connolly in the BA, and McBride with the Boars in S.Africa.

That explains any incompetence - they should have trained with the Boers

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centurion

Just a bit of a side step

My grandfather knew the Gore Booths well having been brought up by his grandfather who was the C of I minister at Lissadell. His views were the diametric opposite of the Countesses' but she still sent him a wedding present!

It was not unusual for Anglo Irish upper crust ladies to shoot as a sport (much as archery was also a popular ladies' sport).

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