Jump to content
Great War Forum

Remembered Today:

geraint

Film 'Gallipoli'

Recommended Posts

stevebecker

Mate,

 

I did see an interview that other night about Peter Weir and the so called "British Drinking tea" comment in the movie.

 

He wanted to put the blame on the British and not the true reasons like the failure of the Kiwis at Chunak Bair and the leader ship in the 3 LH Bde. Even the main officer ordering the charges was to sound British and not Aussie, as he was. (even as a senior officer he may have sound British as many well eductated men in Australia did back then) .

 

S.B

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
brianmorris547

And we should be reminded of what Robert Rhodes James wrote in the preface to the 1989 edition of his book "Gallipoli".

"Public interest in Gallipoli has never really faltered, but was certainly given an immense boost by Peter Weir's beautiful and brilliant film, Gallipoli. Sadly, the film was badly marred by an anti - British streak, culminating in a total distortion of the causes of the disastrous attack by the Ligh (sic) Horse at The Nek - a travesty that would have shocked Charles Bean as much as it did me, and which has recently been corrected in a fine documentary film on the campaign by the Australian Broadcasting Corporation. It is melancholy when so many myths of the campaign - especially in Australia - are perpetuated in this manner, especially as the heroism of the Anzacs requires no mythology".

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
stevebecker

Mate,

 

This so call anti British feeling went on with other Australian films at that time, like the Breaker Morant Movie

 

Where all the blame was put on the British criminal system, not the murder of unarmed Boers by Morant


S.B

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hyacinth1326
Posted (edited)

In fairness a number of lesser Australian television products have echoed the same anti British themes over the years, 'ANZACS', '1915', 'Deadline Gallipoli'  'The Sullivans' had a  few crude tilts too.   The British functioned as an obstacle to the hero finding his son in 'The Water Diviner'.

Edited by Hyacinth1326

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Gunner Bailey

Casualty Figures from Gallipoli:

 

GB & Ireland 21,255 Killed 52,230 Wounded

France  10,000 Killed 17,000 Wounded

Australia 8,709 Killed 19,441 Wounded

New Zealand 2,779 Killed 5212 Wounded

 

Ottoman Empire 86,692 Killed 164,617 Wounded

 

I think the facts speak for themselves. The French seem to be written out of the history of the campaign despite having more people killed than Australia.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
stevebecker

Mate,

 

You should also know these films were ment for a local audience. But they had a life of there own and went all over the world.

 

I don't know if Weir and the destribitors, was after that but it happened.

 

Gallipoli like Breaker Morant were Australians looking at Australians, and attacking the British was always good to stir the pot in Australia.

 

The old hate of the Ashes will continue for ever

 

So I wouldn't worry about the lack of British or other nations, as the same goes for other nations movies on battles, you don't see Aussies being there.

 

Cheers

 

S.B

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hyacinth1326

Morant was born in Britain.  Edward Woodward was cast presumably because he was British and bore a striking resemblance to Morant.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
phil andrade
On 15/05/2019 at 09:08, Gunner Bailey said:

Casualty Figures from Gallipoli:

 

GB & Ireland 21,255 Killed 52,230 Wounded

France  10,000 Killed 17,000 Wounded

Australia 8,709 Killed 19,441 Wounded

New Zealand 2,779 Killed 5212 Wounded

 

Ottoman Empire 86,692 Killed 164,617 Wounded

 

I think the facts speak for themselves. The French seem to be written out of the history of the campaign despite having more people killed than Australia.

 

 

The Kiwis took the heaviest punishment, per capita of population, but they don’t show the same grudge, do they ?

 

Neither do the Canadians, who had their big baptism of fire at almost exactly the same time -  when they were holding the line at Ypres - as the Aussies were landing at Gallipoli.

 

In fact, I think that more Canadians died in a week of fighting in late April 1915 in Belgium than Australians who fell at Gallipoli in the same period.

 

Never mind the Turkish MGs at Gallipoli : it’s the Aussie /yank MG - Mel Gibson - that’s done the British the most damage !😂

 

Phil

Edited by phil andrade

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MikeMeech
On 15/05/2019 at 09:08, Gunner Bailey said:

Casualty Figures from Gallipoli:

 

GB & Ireland 21,255 Killed 52,230 Wounded

France  10,000 Killed 17,000 Wounded

Australia 8,709 Killed 19,441 Wounded

New Zealand 2,779 Killed 5212 Wounded

 

Ottoman Empire 86,692 Killed 164,617 Wounded

 

I think the facts speak for themselves. The French seem to be written out of the history of the campaign despite having more people killed than Australia.

Hi

 

I don't think we should forget Indian Troops, about 1,358 Killed and 3,421 wounded.

 

Mike

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
phil andrade

Yes...and that GB & Ireland figure for deaths is understated by several thousand.

 

The Turkish figure for wounded includes about 64,000 evacuated sick.

 

But Gunner Bailey makes the point well, especially regarding the French.

 

Phil

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Gunner Bailey
12 hours ago, phil andrade said:

Never mind the Turkish MGs at Gallipoli : it’s the Aussie /yank MG - Mel Gibson - that’s done the British the most damage !😂

 

Phil

 

He has a habit of doing that - 'Braveheart'

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
phil andrade

And to make the cup run over, let’s not forget “ The Patriot “.

 

Phil

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Gunner Bailey
On 15/05/2019 at 23:27, stevebecker said:

Mate,

 

You should also know these films were ment for a local audience. But they had a life of there own and went all over the world.

 

I don't know if Weir and the destribitors, was after that but it happened.

 

Gallipoli like Breaker Morant were Australians looking at Australians, and attacking the British was always good to stir the pot in Australia.

 

The old hate of the Ashes will continue for ever

 

So I wouldn't worry about the lack of British or other nations, as the same goes for other nations movies on battles, you don't see Aussies being there.

 

Cheers

 

S.B

 

I don't care if you think the film was made for a local audience. That's a cop out. It had the biggest budget for any Australian film for years. Murdoch involved as well. Murdoch would not have got involved if the film was for local consumption only.

 

Essentially films like Gallipoli steal history from the countries that really own it and then try to spin it so that they (the makers) look good. The heroic cobber farm workers batting against the Toffs of England. Pile on the sympathy? It's just like Hollywood would like to convince Americans that D Day was an American operation, that they fought alone in the Pacific and far east. Ignore the fact that the little old UK had more deaths from WW2 (military and civilian) than the rather larger USA.

 

"The old hate of the Ashes will continue for ever" The Australians may hate but I can assure you the English just see them as old rivals.

 

You can't sandpaper over the differences there....

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hyacinth1326

'The old hate'     It's just cultural immaturity.  Let's just regard it with the pathos it truly deserves.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
phil andrade

Does anyone here know how many of the Australian soldiers at Gallipoli had been born in the UK ?

 

A significant number, I would have thought....in the case of New Zealand, perhaps more so.

 

My good friend’s uncle was born and raised in East London and emigrated to New Zealand in 1910.   He enlisted and served with a New Zealand infantry regiment, and was mortally wounded shortly after his arrival on the peninsula  , shot  in the head by a sniper in May 1915, and dying from his wound whilst being shipped to Alexandria, Egypt, where he is buried.

 

Private George Tuckwell, Canterbury Regiment , born in Walthamstow, died of wounds 20 May 1915, aged 28.

 

My pal was born on Anzac Day in 1940 ; his uncle died almost exactly a quarter of a century before he was born, but every birthday he reflects on the connection and was himself invited to attend a special event in Westminster Abbey to commemorate the  Gallipoli centennial, on account of his family link  and coincidental birthday. I think that the NZ government was keen to press the invitation.

 

I don’t think I’ve seen any screen depictions of Australians in the Great War which show this kind of folklore, which surely merits more acknowledgement .  

 

Mel Gibson syndrome forbids it .

 

Phil

Edited by phil andrade

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...