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corisande

Execution of Tomothy Quinlisk

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archangel9

Found another book in the local library that you might be interested in -

"A Military History of Ireland" by Bartlett and Jeffrey. The book itself seems to be very general in nature and doesn't go into specifics about the Irish Brigade but on page 14 it does have a photo of the Irish Brigade that you might not have. There are perhaps 30 men, two are posing as if they are about to have a bout of boxing. A man in the centre clutches a bottle of beer and might be Quinlisk. I didn't have an eyeglass with me and can't take the book out as it is reference only. Its on google books but of course page 14 is not part of the preview. I believe the photo is property on the National Museum of Ireland so they might agree to you using a copy.

The book is available from Amazon - $29.95

John

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corisande

Thanks for that reference

Quite amazing that there are other photos. I thought that there were only 2 - the NCO group, and the machine gunner group. Keogh got very iffy about people taking photos, as they got allowances stopped if the British could actually identify any of them

I have managed to track down a good second hand copy with your reference info

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archangel9

Good stuff. I would be interested to know how many of the men in the photo you can identify.

John

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corisande
I would be interested to know how many of the men in the photo you can identify.

Right now. I reckon I know most of them as well as my own family ;)

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thomas1

A photo I came across today in a book on Wexford. In the middle Michael Keogh with the shamrock of the Irish Brigade on his lapel.Right and left of him I have no idea.

Regards

Thomas :lol:

post-37411-1269201647.jpg

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corisande

Thomas I have this photo, but there seems to be no names with it.

The man in the centre is certainly Michael Keogh, I think that the one on the right of the photo is Michael O'callaghan, and the one on the left could be Kavanagh.. The two others are certainly in the Irish Brigade uniforms - you can compere it with the NCOs photo or the machine gunners one

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Soren

very interesting thread

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corisande

I have that photo now of the 30 or so men of the Irish Brigade, and am trying to make head or tail of it. It is taken without the NCOS and I would hazard a guess it is taken after the move to Danzig when numbers fell somewhat below the original 56, (which comprised 45 men plus 11 NCOs), take away the odd chap that was promoted to make up for the one that went off in the submarine, the odd one that died, the ones that opted out over this and that and asked to be returned to "normal" POWs and you get this group, in my opinion

One chap is wearing a cap with an odd badge (it is not the Irish Brigade cap badge)

irish-brigade-man-cap.jpg

apologies for photo, it is high res scan of the photo i the book, but you can see it has go right down to the printed dots.

It does not appear to be any of the Irish regiments, so anyone any idea. Cap badges are not something I would go on Mastermind to do!

Anybody help identify it?

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corisande

John

Thanks - going through all the WSs is on my list of things to do. I think that I am going to read the lot (I have read individual ones in the barracks in Dublin previously)

Looks like a long task!

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archangel9

The letter written to Dublin Castle by Quinlisk betraying Michael Collins will shortly come up for auction in Adams Auctioneers in Dublin.

https://www.adams.ie/800-Years-Irish-Political-Literary-Military-History/09-04-2013?view=landing

http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/frontpage/2013/0304/1224330755216.html

It featured yesterday evening on RTE news -

http://www.rte.ie/player/ie/show/10117517/

33.14 into the broadcast. I believe that they used shots of your website corisande.

John

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museumtom

A Remarkable Cork Tragedy.

“Mystery”Man.

Found Shot Near City.

Riddled With Nine Bullets.

Supposed Awful Death.

Extraordinary Story.

The “Freeman” of 19th, contained the following;--Cork was treated to a further sensation when a man was found shot dead on the outskirts of the city.

The body was that of a young and respectably dressed man and was discovered in a field close to the junction of Macroom and Bandon Railway. Bullet wounds were observed in the head and body, near which a cap and rosary beads were found.

Examination showed that the head and body were riddled with bullets, and the wounds were so situated as to indicate concentrated fire at close range.

The impression is that the victim was backed against the fence and shot by a number of men. There is nothing to indicate that a struggle of any kind had taken place, the ground and dykes showing no signs of having been disturbed.

In the pockets was found £1 15s 2d, but besides this was nothing, not even a handkerchief.

At the inquest subsequently, a railway night watchman said he heard shots fired in the vicinity of St Joseph’s Cemetery about 9 o’clock on Wednesday night.

Evidence was given that a man answering the description of deceased stayed at two city hotels and gave the name Quinn.

The body was dressed in an overcoat usually worn by artillerymen. A skull and cross bones was tattooed on one arm.

A Marvellous Story.

The “Evening Herald,” Dublin, of Monday last, has the following on the subject;--

In the article appended our special correspondent in Cork throws much light on the tragedy in Cork and the mystery surrounding the awful death meted out to the man whose bullet riddled body was found in a field near Cork on Thursday morning last.

There is a dismal, bleak bog of a place just outside the southern bounds of the city. Here, on Wednesday night last, was enacted a grim scene, the mystery of which is not yet cleared up.

Looking away over the stretch of bogland from either railroad there are two—nothing meets the eye but waste and stagnant pools, and a ruined lonely house standing in a corner of a field.

St Joseph’s Cemetery, the Glasnevin of Cork, lies in peaceful seclusion within a few hundred yards of the place where was found the bullet riddled body of the mystery man.

Why was he shot—done to death in this manner?

Did the police know at the inquest anything more than was divulged?

What brought him to the city?

These are the questions which time only can clear up, and it may be some years before the real secret of Quinlisk’s mission becomes public knowledge/

Quinlisk or Quinn, the latter name which he traded under for some months past, was a well set up young man. He must have been well known in Dublin. Neatly dressed, with a military British warmer, blue tie, soft collar, and particularly neat shoes and socks, he moved freely about in the Irish capital.

Corporal in Irish Regiment.

I will try to reconstruct the movements of Quinlisk since 1914. In August 4 war broke out and he was then a corporal in the Royal Irish Regiment. The Germans swept on to the Marne, and it is now a matter of history how they were turned back, and then began the run for the Belgian coast. There was severe fighting around Le Bassee, where the Irish Regiments suffered so badly, and Corporal Henry Timothy Quinlisk was captured and sent ot the prisoners camp at Limburg.

Sir Roger Casement arrived in Germany shortly after from America, and formed his Irish Brigade Corps. Quinlisk was one of the first to join, along with a number of other Irish prisoners of was, and was made a Sergeant Major on the Brigade.

Well Educated.

That is the first real important point of his career, so far as it concerns the present story, it is nor at all unlikely that he was selected for this post owing to his superior education. He was not of the ordinary type of man found in the army before the war, as Quinlisk could speak both French and German fluently.

The war ended on November 11th, 1918. The British prisoners of war were released in thousands and mane their way home, nut the men who preferred to join the Casement Brigade preferred toasty in Germany, fearing the consequences on their arrival at London.

Quinlisk knocked about Berlin for several months with little or nothing to do, but apparently continued to draw money from the German Government.

Early in 1919, just one year ago, came the rising in German of the extremists against the new People’s Government. It will be recalled now that a story filtered through from the special correspondents in Germany, how, when things looked all over with the Government troops, a group of Irishmen—men left behind from the Casement Brigade—mounted machine guns on the house tops and with the utmost courage and recklessness, worked them, and held Berlin for the Government.

Quinlisk was one of the men who had a machine gun and held Wilhelmstrause, the Whitehall of the German capital, against advancing revolutionaries.

Arrival In England.

Whether the former corporal of the irish regiment was awarded by the Government for his action is not known. It is supposed that he was, as otherwise he would have no means of support until the following April, when, with three others, he arrived at Calais, and was met there by a Scottish officer and brought to England, not under arrest, however, and he was immediately given leave.

In Dublin.

The next time we meet him, for the purpose of this story, is in Dunlin, midways through last May. He had now assumed the name of Quinn, and from that onwards until his death last Wednesday night he lived under that name.

Apparently the sum of money he received from the British Government as his prisoner’s pay, and the weekly allowance of 32s 6d were all too little for his expensive tastes and were soon gone. At any rate it is evident that he got into touch with some organisation which provided him with some funds. In June last he wrote to a friend of his in London. This friend, who was a former comrade in Casement Brigade, came to Dublin, and on his arrival was met by “Quinlisk.”

His Life In Dublin.

The two remained together is an hotel in Dublin in the metropolis for two months-into the month of July. Quinlisk was all this time drawing his allowance of £1 12s 6d per week from the Government, but at the time mentioned he got orders to rejoin his regiment at the Depot at Clonmel.

Quinlisk refused to go back to his regiment, and gave as an excuse that he feared his comrades because of his actions while a prisoner of war.

Arrest as an absentee or a deserter was almost certain, but one morning brought a letter of his discharge from the Army.

Thus in July came the cutting short of Quinlisk’s Army allowance. But week after week—for almost four months—down to the end of Ocotber a man used to call to his hotel and discharge his bill.

Stranded Without Funds.

Then suddenly the payment ceased. Quinlisk was left without finds and could not go on living in his expensive fashion, as he changed from the hotel to lodgings and began to look for work.

He got employment as an insurance collector, but was not a fortnight in his position when he fell ill with rheumatism, and was confined to bed for several weeks./ But during the time of his illness the payments from the organisation for his board and upkeep again commenced and ceased only when he was up and able to get about again.

In December the payments had totally stopped. Quinlisk was without money and work. It was about this time that he approached a Dublin publishing firm to sell his story of the Casement Brigade, but there was nothing doing, and a very interesting clue to the man’s subsequent acts is provided by his former friend, whom he met three weeks before Christmas in Westmoreland Street, Dublin.

His friend states—“He mane a certain suggestion to me as to how we should obtain money, as the organisation had ceased to supply funds.”

Quinlisk’s friend does not say what the suggestion was.

On through December and January he moved about Dublin, always neatly dressed, living the life of a man about town.

Settles Down In Cork.

Suddenly he left Dublin, and instead of going to his native place in Coutny Wexford, he came to the city of Cork.

He put up at Wren’s Hotel in Winthrop Street. This is one of the most popular hotels with country folk and city people, such as clerks, drapers assistants, etc., in Cork. Quinn remained here only two nights, and left to go to Hoskins Hotel, at the corner of George’s Street and prince’s Street. Quinlisk was apparently well supplied with money and paid his bills.

On Saturday, February 7, Quinlisk and a comrade, who has not yet come forward, were about the town drinking. He called at Wren’s Hotel near midnight looking for more drink. The barman refused to allow him in, as it was after hours, and Quinlisk struck him with a blackthorn stick. He was pushed out of the hotel, and the next time he was seen again was in Albert Street, near the Cork, Blackrock and Passage Railway, on the night of Wednesday, February 11, between half-past nine and ten o’clock.

Nobody came forward at the inquest to provide any other particulars of his movements or business but the barman, William Flynn, is sure that he saw him near the General Post Office, Cork, on Sunday, February 17.

Thus is the last point at which “Quinn” was seen alive.

The rest of the story is only conjecture.

People in this city tell me that Henry Timothy Quinlisk, or Quinn, was tried by “secret tribunal” for some unknown offence—gossip says it was for spying—but who was he spying upon, and who were his paymasters? People are guessing, but guessing leads nowhere.

The body was found perforated with bullets—eleven in all—five of which had entered the forehead. The doctor at the inquest stated that all were fired at close range, and must have all been fired instantaneously. A rosary beads and two religious medals were all that were found on the unfortunate man’s body. No papers, no documents—nothing to identify him. Even his features were almost blown away.

People living in the vicinity heard explosions, which they took for dog-bombs, on Wednesday night, February 18.

There were no signs of a struggle, and if Quinlisk had been a captive, and was being marched to his death across that bleak moorland he did not resist on his death march.

An Imaginative Picture.

Was this the scene, then, that was enacted in that field not two hundred yards from the graveyard—one can almost imagine it;--

Quinlisk, ex-Army man, Sergeant major of the Casement Brigade, marching between a group f anything of from 12 to 15 men with slow, easy paces across the field, until they came to the bank alongside the railway line.

One can imagine Quinlisk, with rosary beads clasped in hands, saying his last prayers; his standing up to face tie firing squad without bandage over eyes. He breathes his last prayer. The suddenly, rings out order, and eleven or twelve shattering out at the same instant and…

Unknown, unmourned, unclaimed by friend or relative, the dead man has been buried in a paupers grave on Carrigaline Hill.

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