Jump to content
Great War Forum

Remembered Today:

Sign in to follow this  
JPAE

Sywell Aerodrome.

Recommended Posts

JPAE

Well thanks for taking the time out and looking per adua.. I look forward to revisiting Sywell and doing some snooping either after Easter, or in Feb. if my wife's family can swing it for a group visit. There is a cracking looking Art Deco hotel opposite too.

Phil.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
per ardua per mare per terram
Some difficulty over verification of the WW2 Rose, but so far, even without this incident, is not diminishing my interest and admiration for this larger than life man.

Thomas Rose DFC also does not feature amongst those who faught in the Battle of Britain. Given the demand for pilots at that point I'm surprised that he doesn't if he was already flying hurricanes on 6th September 1939.

For Thomas Rose DFC to be the same pilot who was shot down on 6th September 1939, he would have to have been demoted in the time prior to the outbreak of the war. Also I suggest that as an experienced pilot, including combat experience (albeit over 20 years previously), for him to be the one shot down it would have been a bigger 'noise.' In the accounts of the 'Battle of Barking Creak' regular comments that I've been coming across relate to the inexperience of the pilots.

I realise that Franks' works need to be treated with caution, but given his interest in the 'aces' of WWI, I would be surprised if he neglected to mention that a pilot on 6th September 1939 was already entitled to a DFC and then had a note identifying FC Rose with a WWI 'ace.' The ribbon of the 1918-1919 is distinctive and should be readily identifyable in a photo; this is also the case if Rose had changed to the later ribbon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
JPAE

p a p m,

Your detective work is thorough and convincing. My challenge will be to unearth some of Tommy Rose's WW1 exploits and I think that a Sywell visit in Spring will be a starting point. We are often in nearby Flore, and my Mother-in-Law will be forced to prop up the bar while I look round the museum. A look at the BE2 and the M-in-L being buzzed by a Fokker Triplane should make a special day.

Phil.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Adrian Roberts
I realise that Franks' works need to be treated with caution

Really? I wasn't aware of this. I wonder if someone could enlighten me as to why this should be, perhaps by PM if you are worried about libel issues.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hectic Historian
On 11/01/2010 at 18:49, centurion said:

Yes he did

He didn't leave the RAF until 1927 being with no 47 sqn. He then worked for a number of companies including Supermarine but really made his name air racing being particularly connected with the Kings Cup. He also did aerobatic displays at many airfield openings etc sometimes putting on dog fights with German ex air aces (a mite like Waldo Pepper).He did a record flight to South Africa from England taking 3 days 17 hours 38 minutes but the following year crashed when landing at one of the stages in another England South Africa air race. He was involved with some well known names (de Haviland,Penrose etc) in a number of airline startups (not all successful)

In 1939 back in the RAF he had the doubtful distinction of being one of the first to British pilots to be shot down in WW2 when his Hurricane was bounced by a Spitfire in a friendly fire incident at the 'Battle of Barking Creek' The other Hurricane pilot was killed but Rose parachuted down in his pyjamas which he had been wearing when scrambled. He became a Squadron Leader in WW2

He died in 1968 in the Channel Islands where he had retired to.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hectic Historian

Tommy Rose did not go back into the RAF in 1939, he was employed at Miles Aircraft Woolley for the duration of the war. The person involved in the Battle of Barking creek was FRANK Rose, no relation.

i am currently compiling historical date on Tommy, who was also my Great Uncle, I have researched an almost complete timeline including his childhood, and can confirm from his RAF records he did not re-enlist, he moved to Alderney in 1949 and died in 1968.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hectic Historian
On 14/01/2010 at 20:33, JPAE said:

p a p m,

Your detective work is thorough and convincing. My challenge will be to unearth some of Tommy Rose's WW1 exploits and I think that a Sywell visit in Spring will be a starting point. We are often in nearby Flore, and my Mother-in-Law will be forced to prop up the bar while I look round the museum. A look at the BE2 and the M-in-L being buzzed by a Fokker Triplane should make a special day.

Phil.

 

On 14/01/2010 at 20:33, JPAE said:

p a p m,

Your detective work is thorough and convincing. My challenge will be to unearth some of Tommy Rose's WW1 exploits and I think that a Sywell visit in Spring will be a starting point. We are often in nearby Flore, and my Mother-in-Law will be forced to prop up the bar while I look round the museum. A look at the BE2 and the M-in-L being buzzed by a Fokker Triplane should make a special day.

Phil.

 

On 14/01/2010 at 20:33, JPAE said:

p a p m,

Your detective work is thorough and convincing. My challenge will be to unearth some of Tommy Rose's WW1 exploits and I think that a Sywell visit in Spring will be a starting point. We are often in nearby Flore, and my Mother-in-Law will be forced to prop up the bar while I look round the museum. A look at the BE2 and the M-in-L being buzzed by a Fokker Triplane should make a special day.

Phil.

There is very little at Sywell, when I visited I was giving them information. If you have any questions I have researched his life extensively, still a few small areas to confirm and cross reference but ready to write his Biography.

sarah

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hectic Historian
On 14/01/2010 at 19:42, per ardua per mare per terram said:

Thomas Rose DFC also does not feature amongst those who faught in the Battle of Britain. Given the demand for pilots at that point I'm surprised that he doesn't if he was already flying hurricanes on 6th September 1939.

For Thomas Rose DFC to be the same pilot who was shot down on 6th September 1939, he would have to have been demoted in the time prior to the outbreak of the war. Also I suggest that as an experienced pilot, including combat experience (albeit over 20 years previously), for him to be the one shot down it would have been a bigger 'noise.' In the accounts of the 'Battle of Barking Creak' regular comments that I've been coming across relate to the inexperience of the pilots.

I realise that Franks' works need to be treated with caution, but given his interest in the 'aces' of WWI, I would be surprised if he neglected to mention that a pilot on 6th September 1939 was already entitled to a DFC and then had a note identifying FC Rose with a WWI 'ace.' The ribbon of the 1918-1919 is distinctive and should be readily identifyable in a photo; this is also the case if Rose had changed to the later ribbon.

It was Frank Rose, not Tommy

 

On 14/01/2010 at 19:42, per ardua per mare per terram said:

Thomas Rose DFC also does not feature amongst those who faught in the Battle of Britain. Given the demand for pilots at that point I'm surprised that he doesn't if he was already flying hurricanes on 6th September 1939.

For Thomas Rose DFC to be the same pilot who was shot down on 6th September 1939, he would have to have been demoted in the time prior to the outbreak of the war. Also I suggest that as an experienced pilot, including combat experience (albeit over 20 years previously), for him to be the one shot down it would have been a bigger 'noise.' In the accounts of the 'Battle of Barking Creak' regular comments that I've been coming across relate to the inexperience of the pilots.

I realise that Franks' works need to be treated with caution, but given his interest in the 'aces' of WWI, I would be surprised if he neglected to mention that a pilot on 6th September 1939 was already entitled to a DFC and then had a note identifying FC Rose with a WWI 'ace.' The ribbon of the 1918-1919 is distinctive and should be readily identifyable in a photo; this is also the case if Rose had changed to the later ribbon.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...