Jump to content
The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Remembered Today:

Amazing finds


stephen p nunn
 Share

Recommended Posts

Cheers! (Hic)

Norman

Quick reply, was just looking for the in-depth answer I knew was on here somewhere:

http://1914-1918.invisionzone.com/forums/i...entry8811

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Very interesting thanks, I do now recall that has been lot of debate over the meaning of SRD on the forum.

Regards

Norman

PS Just a thought, I wonder what part of the container my bit is from.....Oh no I wish I had not mentioned that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Normna,

another KZ 14

they were made in brass, zinc or alumium

Cnock

post-7723-1266866143.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That is an excellent example Cnock, any chance of swops?.

Norman

PS I bet you have been asked this many times but how do you get these so clean?.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ypres 1998

What is left of rum jars when a bull dozer passed along

Regards,

Cnock

post-7723-1266867185.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Re cleaning...battery acid and other acids do the trick if you like the orangy colour. Personally I dont and note acids are not available in the UK. Some snad blast also.

A good half way method of cleaning if you want is leave the brass item in coke for a while (mildly acidic) and then a scrub with brasso and wire wool of varying gauges.

Nowadays if I bring items back (rare) i dont clean at all other than a rinse.

TT

Link to comment
Share on other sites

SRD is actually "Supply Reserve Depot".

Wasn't it "Seldom Reaches Destination" ?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wasn't it "Seldom Reaches Destination" ?

Like "Soon Runs Dry", simply a soldiers affectation.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In a wood near Bony. I was very careful not to touch the nettles!

I think it is a gas shell?

Quite correct and here is a little country tip, if the shell explodes then a Dock Leaf will prove useful in soothing any rash/minor cuts etc. I think I have that right!.

Norman :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Re cleaning...battery acid and other acids do the trick if you like the orangy colour. Personally I dont and note acids are not available in the UK. Some snad blast also.

A good half way method of cleaning if you want is leave the brass item in coke for a while (mildly acidic) and then a scrub with brasso and wire wool of varying gauges.

Nowadays if I bring items back (rare) i dont clean at all other than a rinse.

TT

I heard recently that soaking in stale milk is an effective method of cleaning tarnished brass/bronze!!

Presumably it's also mildly acidic and works along the same way as cola and battery acid, but makes for a pretty unpleasant workbench while so doing!

Anyone had any experience of this?

I have a lot of brass/bronze fittings on the 50 year old sailing dinghy I'm renovating and it'd be nice to know if it'd be worth risking the stench - LOL :lol:

Cheers,

Mark

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This ID Tag was found by a member of my party in Death Valley, Mametz Wood, Somme on the surface. The details appear to be:

MALONE

11370

21 Battery

3 Brigade

R,C

A.P.H (?)

I cannot find any trace of this man on the CWGC database therefore I presume that he survived the war. This image was the best I could do as the item was very small and the photo was taken with 35mm film camera.

Norman

4394246593_5bee826e7b.jpg

Where the ID Tag was found:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

MALONE

11370

21 Battery

3 Brigade

R,C

A.P.H (?)

A.F.A.?

Norman,

Go to http://naa12.naa.gov.au/NameSearch/Interfa...SearchForm.aspx and search for the records of 11370 Henry Silvester MALONE of Braidwood NSW who served in the Australian Field Artillery. If I squint hard enough, I think I can read 21st Battery and 3rd Brigade in the Statement of Service on p.4.

Adrian

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Adrian that is absolutely amazing and I thank you for the info. I have looked at the records and you are completely right. When the member of my party found this I was concerned that it may have belonged to a soldier who had been killed but now I know the actual facts I do feel a lot more relaxed about the find. I have had another look at the photo and the initials H.S do appear on the tag. Everything seems to fit.

Nice work

Norman

PS Australia is so lucky to have the records intact and made available to the public as they are. When you think, picked up near Mametz Wood and then identified 94 years later due to both your expertise and the records being on-line.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Detail of a German Mauser Rifle found on the battlefield of the Somme, France. The rifle is complete but of course the wooden parts have all rotted away after 90+ years in the ground.

Norman

4406310278_ea8f4d4f3a.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes but only if you show us the rest of the pics.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh gosh, plenty of photos. Here are a few more:

15.jpg

18.jpg

21.jpg

We can all be a bit extreme in our collecting habits and we hover between totally extreme and insane. We are always on the look out for bits and pieces to complete our restorations and then when we do find an original piece that we need it is truly an "amazing find" (well to us anyway).

This might not be the done thing here, but there is a link below to our Thornycroft restoration. The project is on hold at the moment, but with a bit of luck should really kick off again in 2011 or 2012.

http://hmvf.co.uk/forumvb/showthread.php?1...oft-restoration

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Fantastic link I am impressed. The Soul of Fred Dibnah lives on. I especially like the quote 'A price was agreed upon'.

Mick

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...