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Regimental abbreviation help required


armourersergeant

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Hello,

I was wondering what the accepted abbreviation for Somerset Light Infantry is. I am almost sure you never see SLI (as you would KOYLI etc) so is there another accepted name. I seem to think Somersets?

Thus after the first use of the 6th battalion Somerset Light Infantry [somersets], the 6th Somersets would be acceptable?

Thanks in advance

Andy

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I seem to be first up here. I don't know about accepted usage, but your version seems logical to me, and I can't see any confusion would arise once the original has been given in full. I cannot remember ever seeing 'SLI'.

D

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CWGC just calls it Somerset Light Infantry.

I am interested because an uncle of mine 19241 Pte H C Durnford was KIA on the Somme serving with the 6th

David

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Sounds right to me Andy and I am sure that's the way I have seen most County regiments referred to as; Norfolks, Essex, Middlesex etc.

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I agree with Phil in that I have seen the abbreviation expressed like that, but I cannot be certain that I have seen this in anything official or contemporary.

Volumes of the 'Military Operations....' series are always a good source of official abbreviations, do you have any of them handy?

I could check for you, but as always with these lunchtime forays into GWF -land, you'll have to wait 'til I get home.

Just to compound confusion, The King's Own (Yorkshire Light Infantry), though mostly seen as KOYLI is also often encountered simply as YLI and even more confusingly, just as King's Own.

Cheers,

Nigel

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Memory tells me "Somersets" is right. "Som LI" I think was a later, WW2, use.

I have the regimental history at home, so I'll have a look later and see what that uses.

SLI, I suspect, would be open to confusion with the KSLI.

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Hello all

The 1914 Army List says "Som LI" which is therefore the correct official abbreviation for correspondence within the Army.

Beyond that, I suggest that Somersets would be appropriate in a regimental history or biographies. In such texts, Som LI might be rather obscure for non=specialist readers..

The full title was Prince Albert's (Somerset Light Infantry).

Ron

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Hello all

The 1914 Army List says "Som LI" which is therefore the correct official abbreviation for correspondence within the Army.

Beyond that, I suggest that Somersets would be appropriate in a regimental history or biographies. In such texts, Som LI might be rather obscure for non=specialist readers..

The full title was Prince Albert's (Somerset Light Infantry).

Ron

Actually it says Som. L.I.,

and I am not sure that reading of the Army List is correct.

The page in question, xxxvii, is entitled:

ALPHABETICAL LIST OF REGIMENTS BY THE TITLES DIRECTED TO BE USED IN OFFICIAL CORRESPONDENCE and then gives after the full name of each regiment its ARMY LIST abbreviation. You have quoted the latter, whereas it can be inferred that the full title is to be used for official correspondence. Interestingly, Prince Albert does not get a mention on this page, only on the full page of regimetal details, where it becomes

PRINCE ALBERT'S (SOMERSET LIGHT INFANTRY).

All of which is a bit pedantic of me, but in years to come this Forum may be seen to be a fount of accurate knowledge!

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QUOTE: this Forum may be seen to be a fount of accurate knowledge!

May I suggest that it might be found to be as accurate as the curate's egg was excellent, saving your good self, of course.

D

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Memory tells me "Somersets" is right. "Som LI" I think was a later, WW2, use.

I have the regimental history at home, so I'll have a look later and see what that uses.

SLI, I suspect, would be open to confusion with the KSLI.

Very true, i get quite a few enquires where people think the SLI is the KSLI.

I refer call the battalions of the KSLI as Xth Shropshire's

Neil

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Thank you all,

Its as clear as mud!

I think I would be safe to use 6th Somersets for the biography I am writing as the most user friendly, though perhaps not military accurate.

Thanks again

Arm

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Ps..

I thought the full title was Somerset Light Infantry (Prince Albert's) as in the title of the Regimental history by Wyrall.

Regards

Arm

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I think I would be safe to use 6th Somersets for the biography I am writing as the most user friendly, though perhaps not military accurate.

Arm,

If you're going to the trouble of writing Somersets in full, why not drop the 2nd S and insert L.I. ?

I reckon any confusion after that would be deliberate!

Cheers,

Nigel

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Official title in 1914 was Prince Albert's (Somerset Light Infantry). Titles changed post war (as in the Prince of Wales's Volunteers (South Lancashire regiment) becoming The South Lancashire regiment (Prince of Wales's Volunteers)).

Anyway, the regimental history (Everard Wyrall) uses Somersets throughout.

The History of the 20th (Light) Division uses Somerset LI.

I'd stick with Everard.

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Arm,

If you're going to the trouble of writing Somersets in full, why not drop the 2nd S and insert L.I. ?

I reckon any confusion after that would be deliberate!

Cheers,

Nigel

Not a bad idea, I will play around with a few versions to see.

regards

Arm

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Official title in 1914 was Prince Albert's (Somerset Light Infantry). Titles changed post war (as in the Prince of Wales's Volunteers (South Lancashire regiment) becoming The South Lancashire regiment (Prince of Wales's Volunteers)).

Anyway, the regimental history (Everard Wyrall) uses Somersets throughout.

The History of the 20th (Light) Division uses Somerset LI.

I'd stick with Everard.

Thanks for the clarification. i am surprised then that Wyrall used the new title to cover a period where the old title would ahve been more apt.

I have/had noticed he used Somersets through the pages I have re 6th battalion and thought this most appropriate however there is something that does not roll off the tongue with Somersets as is does with say Suffolks or others. But then I am being a little picky and getting far to hooked up in something that has little true relevance to what I am writing.

Thanks

Arm

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Thanks for the clarification. i am surprised then that Wyrall used the new title to cover a period where the old title would ahve been more apt.

The Regiment may well have used the title as Wyrall sets it out - I can't imagine many blokes would have said they were in Prince Albert's: they'd have said Somerset Light Infantry. Similarly, one seldom sees the South Lancs being referred to as the Prince of Wales's Volunteers.

Personally, as "Somersets" is what Wyrall (and, therefore, presumably the regiment) favour, I'd go with that.

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On the assumption that the proposed book on said battalion has a preface or whatever, I think that is the place to explain the usages adopted by the author.

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