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Remembered Today:

Researching those killed in Ireland


Will O'Brien

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Will O'Brien

I am currently researching a chap, those younger brother has sent me off on a tangent.............The brother, Frederick Carroll was killed whilst serving in Ireland with the Northamptonshire Regt in 1921.................Can any one point me in the right direction as to how to go about researching such a chap............No MIC, No records available from the PRO, the soldier was too young to serve between 1914-1918...............the only thing I have found is his CGWC entry as he scrapes in before the cut off date

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Have you got in touch with the Regiment's museum?

I assume since no post-1918 MiC present, these men did not qualify for any of the WW1 awards used to mark later services in Russia, Arabia etc. Mind, I suppose it was considered a police action and since the police did not get a medal neither did they.

Did those present in Dublin in 1916 received the BWM or no awards at all - assuming they did not leave UK during WW1?

Cheers

Richard

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Will O'Brien
Will--

Where was he killed ??

Nigel..............thats one of the problems :( ................I have no idea.........I have a date when he died...........6th June 1921...................He is buried back in the UK in a cemetery local to me.............His headstone is inscribed 'killed in Ireland' & thats about it other than his name & regiment................Not alot to go on I know

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Will O'Brien
Have you got in touch with the Regiment's museum?

I assume since no post-1918 MiC present, these men did not qualify for any of the WW1 awards used to mark later services in Russia, Arabia etc. Mind, I suppose it was considered a police action and since the police did not get a medal neither did they.

Did those present in Dublin in 1916 received the BWM or no awards at all - assuming they did not leave UK during WW1?

Cheers

Richard

Richard...........No I'd not thought of the regimental museum............many thanks for that :D ....................As far as I am aware service in Ireland did not qualify for any WWI awards either for post 1918 service or 1916 Dublin service as Ireland was strictly seen as home service up until 1922

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Will

If you can find out roughly where he was killed i might be able to do something as ambushes and skirmishes were documented and marked over here especially if republican forces were killed as well

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Just a thought, but if you know where the soldier came from and date of death you may be able to find some record of his death in the local newspaper; you may also find information in the archives of the Irish newspapers.

Cheers

Richard

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Guest Desmond6

Doing some hunting - in the meantime, this will take you to a site in Cork which gives a breakdown of that IRA brigade's activities, deaths, membership around the period. I can see one man who was killed on/near the same day as your British soldier.

This may be of some help. I'll be back with anything more.

Des currently researching the Ulster Division ... now trawling for old IRA!

Strange old world this Forum.

Des

http://www.sci.net.au/userpages/mgrogan/cork/army_d.htm

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Write to; Martin Dwyer, Cashel Folk Village Museum, Tipperary, Ireland and ask him can he help you....he has access to many old names/lists for this time. Mention my name. Tom Burnell, research Curator, Thurles famine and War Museum. Tipperary.

Tom

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Will O'Brien

Nigel/Richard/Des/Tom...................Many thanks for your help on this one.............I am currently trying to contact the Northamptonshire regimental museum to see if they can at least tell me where the 1st Battalion were located in Ireland when this soldier was killed. This info should at least give me a sporting chance of finding out some more

Just a thought, but if you know where the soldier came from and date of death you may be able to find some record of his death in the local newspaper
..............Richard, unfortunately there is b****r all in the local paper archive, which is a bit surprising as his elder brother got quite a write up when he was killed in 1915.
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Will O'Brien
Probably dosen't help a great deal but the truce was agreed on the 4th of July 1921 with effect from 11th July 1921

Many thanks for that snippet of info........It all helps builds the picture & it highlights how unlucky young Frederick Carroll was..................he was killed less than a month before this cease fire ocurred.

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  • 3 months later...

Just to update all those offered pointers as to where to look next on this matter.............I have now found out that young Frederick Carroll was accidentally killed by one of his own comrades. A rifle which was thought to be unloaded discharged, killing Frederick instantly.............A bit of a tragedy for the parents who had already lost their eldest son in the Great War

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Still - well hunted down. or should I say ..

Good Will Hunting?

Was that a movie .. or am I Tube? :D

Des

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Did some Pal refer some time ago to a book / CD that had fairly comprehensive records of British casulaties in the 1916 Rising?

I'd be very interested in a reminder of it, if so.

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Will,

Just out of interest, how did you eventually find the information.

Regards

Gavin

Gavin.............Out of desperation I took another delve into the newspaper archives & found a small write up about his funeral. This contained in passing some info regarding Frederick Carroll's death.

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Did some Pal refer some time ago to a book / CD that had fairly comprehensive records of British casulaties in the 1916 Rising? I'd be very interested in a reminder of it, if so. 

Simon

The book is...

'1916 Rebellion Handbook' with Introduction by Declan Kiberd

Published 1998 by The Mourne River Press

ISBN 1 902090 05 5

My copy cost £14.99 about three years ago.

Comprehensive lists of all casualties from all participant groups and masses of other detail.

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Great - thanks Terry.

Simon

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