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SS/H.M Hospital Ship GLENART CASTLE


Neil Clark
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Whilst driving in Wicklow Mountains (Ireland) last month I came across a small castle (Glenart) just outside Arklow. The castle is now being used as a hotel. Inside the reception there is a painting on the wall of a ship called the Glenart Castle. I was told it was sunk by torpedo during the Great War with the loss of over 100 men.

Anyone able to confirm details. I want to demonstrate the effectiveness of this site and its members to a friend.

Thanks..

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Neil

Re Glenart Castle

01/03/1917 6824 tons Hospital Ship, struck mine in English Channel, towed in, no casualties

26/02/1918 6824 tons Hospital Ship, torpedoed by U-Boat, no warning given, 10 miles west from Lundy Island. 95 lives lost, including Master.

Steve

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The Glenart cCastle was built fo the Union-Castle Steamship Company in 1900 by Harland and Wolfe. On 15th August 1915, whilst sailing under her original name, Galacian, she was intercepted by the German Auxiliary cruiser, Kaiser Wilhelm der Grosse off Tenerife whilst on her way home from Cape Town. Lt Deane and Gunner Sherman were taken prisoner, but the ship was allowed to continue on her way as there were women and children aboard.

She was later taken over by the British Government as a hospital ship and renamed Glenart Castle. On 26th February 1918, she was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine UC-56, ten miles West of Lundy Island, on a voyage from Newport to Brest, to collect wounded.. Capt Burt and 94 of her crew were among the 153 killed out of her complement of 186.

Terry Reeves

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Thanks to you all,

Yet again the forum proves its worth!

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  • 7 months later...

I am just taking this opportunity, in memory of my Great Uncle, Dr. John Addison Stainsby, who was a doctor on the Glenart Castle when it was torpedoed by the Germans in February 1918, to recognize not only his contribution to the war effort, but the collective effort of all the other crew members aboard. May they all rest in peace.

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Maud Elizabeth Ward lived in Glenart Castle, Arklow, Co. Wicklow as Secretary to the Countess of Carysfort until the latter's death in January 1918 and subsequently as Secretary to Colonel Douglas Proby, who took over the Carysfort estates. On 10 October 1918 she left for Kingstown (now Dun Laoghaire), Co. Dublin where she boarded the R.M.S. Leinster. About an hour after leaving port the Leinster was torpedoed by UB-123 with the loss of over 500 lives. It was the greatest ever loss of life in the Irish Sea. Maud Elizabeth Ward was among those who were lost. She is buried in Deansgrange Cemetery, Co. Dublin. (see seperate forum discussion on the sinking of the R.M.S. Leinster). So Glenart Castle, Arklow, Co. Wicklow has a connection with two torpedoed WW1 ships.

Philip

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  • 6 years later...

I am just taking this opportunity, in memory of my Great Uncle, Dr. John Addison Stainsby, who was a doctor on the Glenart Castle when it was torpedoed by the Germans in February 1918, to recognize not only his contribution to the war effort, but the collective effort of all the other crew members aboard. May they all rest in peace.

Hello,

I represent the group of people who raised the memorial to HMHS Glenart Castle on Hartland Point. We have started to collect details of all those who were in the ship at the time of the sinking; do you have any family details and possibly a phot of your relative? 2012 will be the tenth year of commemoration at Hartland and all Forum members will be most welcome.

Michael Harrison (Julian Byng)

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Michael,

It looks like jdonohue's account has been deleted, so you are unlikely to get any response. However, you will find there's quite a lot of interest in the Glenart Castle on this forum, and recently there's been quite a lot of info gathered about 2 of those killed, Harry Lund and Jesse White, see

 

 

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I want to demonstrate the effectiveness of this site and its members to a friend.

ROFL laugh.gif for everyone involved in the Harry Lund and Jesse White threads!!!

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Michael,

It looks like jdonohue's account has been deleted, so you are unlikely to get any response. However, you will find there's quite a lot of interest in the Glenart Castle on this forum, and recently there's been quite a lot of info gathered about 2 of those killed, Harry Lund and Jesse White, see http://1914-1918.inv...howtopic=154644 , http://1914-1918.inv...howtopic=151697 and http://1914-1918.inv...howtopic=160465

Hi David,

Many thanks for the information regarding Harry Lund, I must follow it up. Our group are just setting out to build a data base of all those who were in the ship, a huge task I know. We have been lucky to contact one of the decendants of Alfred Bale (AKA Boston) who survived the sinking. What a man he was, he served in the American Army during the war with Mexico and also in China, his grandon Martyn, has an amazing collection of memorabilia relating to his grandfather. Regarding the memorial to the ship at Hartland Point, I was granted the honour of composing the inscription by the Great Niece of Katy Beaufoy. It may also be of interest to GWF members that Katy had a nephew, 2Lt. Clive Beaufoy, who was K.I.A. 25/09/18 while serving with the 10th Battl. Royal Warwicks, Clive is buried in Vielle Chapelle Military Cemetery. On several occasions following Katy's death, Clive spoke of feeling that she was with him on the Western Front.

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  • 5 weeks later...

Here is a list of 81 I tracked down through ancestry.co.uk's Soldiers died in the Great War, I may well be able to confirm more with time. If anyone wants the raw data for the others, i can post here or send via email.

My main interest is the eight nurses, as I am working on a project tracing all Military Nursing staff who died in the Great War.

Ernest Henry Allday 26-Feb-18 RE At Sea M

Daniel Duncan 26-Feb-18 RE At Sea M

Francis James Helsby 26-Feb-18 RE At Sea M

Patrick Joyce 26-Feb-18 RE At Sea M

Arthur Smith 26-Feb-18 RE At Sea M

Harry Slater Birmingham 26-Feb-18 RE At Sea M

George Arthur Weaver Blackburn, Lancs 26-Feb-18 RE At Sea M

Thomas Watson Holden Bolton, Lancs 26-Feb-18 RE At Sea M

William Arthur Watkins Brightlingsea, Essex 26-Feb-18 RE At Sea M

James Burgon Eyemouth, Berwickshire 26-Feb-18 RE At Sea M

Arthur Fry Gillingham, Kent 26-Feb-18 RE At Sea M

Bernard Currie Glace Bay, Nova Scotia 26-Feb-18 RE At Sea M

Charles Frederick Yuille Glasgow 26-Feb-18 RE At Sea M

John Cato Liverpool, Lancs 26-Feb-18 RE At Sea M

James Colvin Liverpool, Lancs 26-Feb-18 RE At Sea M

John Davies Liverpool, Lancs 26-Feb-18 RE At Sea M

James Evans Liverpool, Lancs 26-Feb-18 RE At Sea M

Frank Hill Liverpool, Lancs 26-Feb-18 RE At Sea M

George Metcalf Liverpool, Lancs 26-Feb-18 RE At Sea M

George Parkinson Liverpool, Lancs 26-Feb-18 RE At Sea M

Robert Smith Liverpool, Lancs 26-Feb-18 RE At Sea M

Bernard Mauritz Berndsson Maistrand, Sweden 26-Feb-18 RE At Sea M

Bertie Edward Browne Norwich 26-Feb-18 RE At Sea M

Edward Castier Laing Peckham, Surrey 26-Feb-18 RE At Sea M

William Ernest Mann St. Peters, Bedford 26-Feb-18 RE At Sea M

William Walklett West Derby, Lancs 26-Feb-18 RE At Sea M

Katy Beaufoy 26-Feb-18 QAIMNS At Sea F

R R Beresford 26-Feb-18 QAIMNS At Sea F

Edith Blake 26-Feb-18 QAIMNS At Sea F

Elizabeth Edgar 26-Feb-18 QAIMNS At Sea F

Jane Evans 26-Feb-18 QAIMNS At Sea F

Charlotte E Henry 26-Feb-18 QAIMNS At Sea F

R E Kendall 26-Feb-18 QAIMNS At Sea F

Arthur Edward Kelsey 26-Feb-18 RAMC At Sea M

Lewis Moysey 26-Feb-18 RAMC At Sea M

John Addison Stainsby 26-Feb-18 RAMC At Sea M

George William Young 26-Feb-18 RAMC At Sea M

David Kelso Ardrossan, Ayr 26-Feb-18 RAMC At Sea M

Charles Clamp Atherstone, Warwick 26-Feb-18 RAMC At Sea M

George William Adams Bath, Som. 26-Feb-18 RAMC At Sea M

Henry Donnelly Belpen, Derby 26-Feb-18 RAMC At Sea M

John Goldsworthy Birmingham 26-Feb-18 RAMC At Sea M

Reuben Underhill Bridgend, Glam. 26-Feb-18 RAMC At Sea M

Thomas Birch Burnley, Lancs 26-Feb-18 RAMC At Sea M

James Mcmeekin Calderbank, Lanark 26-Feb-18 RAMC At Sea M

Albert Victor Last Chatham, Kent 26-Feb-18 RAMC At Sea M

Alfred Brice Chiswick, London, W. 26-Feb-18 RAMC At Sea M

John Ritchie Cruden, Aberdeen 26-Feb-18 RAMC At Sea M

Arthur George Brown Forest Gate, Essex 26-Feb-18 RAMC At Sea M

Joseph Jardine Glasgow 26-Feb-18 RAMC At Sea M

Percy Rogers Guildford, Surrey 26-Feb-18 RAMC At Sea M

Harold Victor Wadsworth Halifax 26-Feb-18 RAMC At Sea M

George Thomas Hutson Hampstead, London 26-Feb-18 RAMC At Sea M

Thomas Henry Wright Haverhill 26-Feb-18 RAMC At Sea M

Alexander Abrahamson Hutchesontown 26-Feb-18 RAMC At Sea M

William Saul Cumber Islington, London, N. 26-Feb-18 RAMC At Sea M

George Mavor Kirkcaldy 26-Feb-18 RAMC At Sea M

William Richmond Knaresborough, Yorks 26-Feb-18 RAMC At Sea M

William Small Kymer, Sussex 26-Feb-18 RAMC At Sea M

Thomas Hyatt London 26-Feb-18 RAMC At Sea M

Frederick Thomas Vine London 26-Feb-18 RAMC At Sea M

John Ferguson Murravonside, Stirling 26-Feb-18 RAMC At Sea M

Gilchrist Lyon New Lanark, Lanark 26-Feb-18 RAMC At Sea M

Frederick Simpson Newcastle, Staffs 26-Feb-18 RAMC At Sea M

George Breakell Newcastle-On-Tyne 26-Feb-18 RAMC At Sea M

William Hay Newhills, Aberdeen 26-Feb-18 RAMC At Sea M

Ernest Bamford Oldham, Lancs 26-Feb-18 RAMC At Sea M

William Thomas Grimsley Padbury, Bucks 26-Feb-18 RAMC At Sea M

Llewellyn Daniel Rhondda, Glam. 26-Feb-18 RAMC At Sea M

Andrew Duncan Scoone, Leven, Fife 26-Feb-18 RAMC At Sea M

Edward Corben Turner Shrewsbury 26-Feb-18 RAMC At Sea M

Samuel Gerdes South Hackney, Surrey 26-Feb-18 RAMC At Sea M

Harry Benham Southampton 26-Feb-18 RAMC At Sea M

John Norton St. Luke's 26-Feb-18 RAMC At Sea M

William Albert Smith St. Mary's Salop 26-Feb-18 RAMC At Sea M

William Blench Stockton, Durham 26-Feb-18 RAMC At Sea M

John Wright Warrington, Lancs 26-Feb-18 RAMC At Sea M

Jacob Jacobs Whitechapel, Middx. 26-Feb-18 RAMC At Sea M

John Parry Wrexham 26-Feb-18 RAMC At Sea M

Algernon Aubrey Bakewell Warrilow Chippenham 26-Feb-18 RAMC At Sea M

Mary Mackinnon 26-Feb-18 TANS At Sea F

Regards,

Fiona

[p.s. sorry about the layout, tried various ways, and it won't let me attach a spreadsheet]

Hello,

I represent the group of people who raised the memorial to HMHS Glenart Castle on Hartland Point. We have started to collect details of all those who were in the ship at the time of the sinking; do you have any family details and possibly a phot of your relative? 2012 will be the tenth year of commemoration at Hartland and all Forum members will be most welcome.

Michael Harrison (Julian Byng)

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My main interest is the eight nurses, as I am working on a project tracing all Military Nursing staff who died in the Great War.

I have a full list of WW1 serving female casualties. Why do you need to know?

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I'm sure the number of estimated casualties has appeared in at least one of the previous threads, but a quick scan via Geoff;s Search Engine has 95 Merchant Marine without any military, nursing etc....

I'm sure those have been accounted for in those threads, too. Doctors, Chaplains etc etc...

The Wrecksite website gives 153 casualties, but I think there were more than that, if I recall correctly....

I'd therefore recommend a read through those threads as I feel the answers are already there...

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I'm sitting in a hotel in London so haven't the time to clarify/verify my references, but there's a lot about the Glenart Castle in The National Archives. She was the subject, with REWA, of a programme called Red Cross Outrage or some such - I was part-involved in the research, and the programme is repeated every now & then.

There was an article on the BBC website on Friday which would make me chary of reinventing the wheel if I went into researching nursing casualties now:

"Wartime nurses have been the subject of a decade of painstaking research by historian Yvonne McEwen, from Edinburgh University. She has discovered that at least 2,000 nurses who served for the UK died in the world wars. Ms McEwen's work has been presented in special books to the Royal College of Nursing, which has taken up her call for a national memorial to express gratitude."

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-12922707

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Yes, I heard about Yvonne's wonderful work earlier this week through a contact at the RCN Press Office, and am awaiting contact, as we seem to be duplicating some research. Having researched the Glenart Castle considerably, there are many conflicting numbers for those who died / survived, I have that there were one hundred and forty-five lives lost, including one man who died the following day from wounds received when the propellers of a rescue ship caught him; with thirty-seven surviving. Anyone able to offer a solid calculation?!

Regards,

Fiona

I'm sitting in a hotel in London so haven't the time to clarify/verify my references, but there's a lot about the Glenart Castle in The National Archives. She was the subject, with REWA, of a programme called Red Cross Outrage or some such - I was part-involved in the research, and the programme is repeated every now & then.

There was an article on the BBC website on Friday which would make me chary of reinventing the wheel if I went into researching nursing casualties now:

"Wartime nurses have been the subject of a decade of painstaking research by historian Yvonne McEwen, from Edinburgh University. She has discovered that at least 2,000 nurses who served for the UK died in the world wars. Ms McEwen's work has been presented in special books to the Royal College of Nursing, which has taken up her call for a national memorial to express gratitude."

http://www.bbc.co.uk...health-12922707

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Yes, I heard about Yvonne's wonderful work earlier this week through a contact at the RCN Press Office, and am awaiting contact, as we seem to be duplicating some research. Having researched the Glenart Castle considerably, there are many conflicting numbers for those who died / survived, I have that there were one hundred and forty-five lives lost, including one man who died the following day from wounds received when the propellers of a rescue ship caught him; with thirty-seven surviving. Anyone able to offer a solid calculation?!

Regards,

Fiona

The man who died after being caught in the rescuing ships propellors was Fireman Jesse White. The Harry Lund thread gives evidence for this and also lists details of the resuce efforts, Most of this is near to the end of the thread I think. I seem to recall we'd nearly finished the thread when this subject came up. Jesse White also got his own thread regarding his final resting place and he has been put forward for a CWGC headstone as he's buried in a Southampton cemetery with stone to mark this.

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There was an article on the BBC website on Friday which would make me chary of reinventing the wheel if I went into researching nursing casualties now:

But what shape is the wheel and what does it look like? This work has been handed to the Royal College of Nursing - what does it comprise and what plans do they have for it? Until this and similar research is in the public domain people will continue to tread a similar path, and quite rightly so.

Sue

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Hi Sue

LTNS :)

I was informed it was in a list format, and that there were 5 large bound volumes [red leather[ette]?]. I am trying to press the RCN into taking Peter Carter's call for a permanent memorial sooo much further ... watch this space! ----->

Ok, enough frivolity, obviously I have all this info I collected along the way when working on the Nurses of 1NGH, and my target is to provide [not just through my research, but also genealogy skills], a thorough record to honour the Nurses who have died in war, [WW1, WW2, Boer, and Crimea at least], and I am fairly certain Yvonne's info does not go to these extremes, my are more in a biog format. I am awaiting contact with that good lady via the RCN Press Office, who contacted me earlier in the week, and also been in touch with Manchester Uni, and Christine HALLETT. I doubt Yvonne's research found that one of the Nurses who died in the Great War was the great-niece of David LIVINGSTONE, another descends from Royalty, etc., but that's what helps make it all the more fascinating for me :)

If I could secure funding to do this full-time, I'd be over the moon, any ideas? I've got a few small funds interested, and been right through the RCN list, most are not interested in the Histrionics of Nursing, but the here and now, which I thoroughly understand, but if folk like you and I do not pick up the gauntlet, the info will get lost in the annals of time ...

Fiona

p.s. Here's one for us, lest we forget, and just an example of the lengths I research to ... although this is one of the longer write-ups:

"Sophia Violet BARRETT

(1884 - 1918)

Died 10 Oct 1918 Nurse, VAD Drowned

Violet was born in 1884 at Ballintava, co. Galway, Ireland, the younger daughter of local Landowner and Justice of the Peace,Samuel BARRETT.[1] They lived in the Manor House in Ballintava, however, her father appears to have died when she was young, certainly pre-WW1, and she was found in the 1911 census, a visitor in the home of Noble and Elizabeth ARMSTRONG of Lislea, Doory, co. Longford. Shortly after, she was living in the home of her aunt, Marcella Esther Ann (nee BARRETT), and uncle, William Henry WILSON of Carrickmines House, Foxrock, co. Dublin, from where she joined the Carrickmines VAD branch in 1914.

Violet served initially as a Nurse in Dublin, then England, and then onto France, where she arrived in April 1916, firstly at No 6 General Hospital, Rouen, then at No 2 Stationary Hospital, Abbeyville. She was Mentioned in Despatches in 1917,[2] by Sir Douglas HAIG in his despatch of 7 Nov 1918 to the Secretary of State for War, listed her amongst others "... who have served under my command during the period February 26th to midnight, September 20/21st 1917 whose distinguished and gallant services and devotion to duty I consider deserving of special mention."

She spent her last month in France nursing wounded German Prisoners of War, before having some home leave, and was returning to her nursing duties at the front, just a month before the end of the war. On 10 Oct 1918 she was a passenger on the Royal Mail Steamer (RMS), heading from Kingstown, Ireland to Holyhead, Wales. Shortly before 0900 hrs, the Leinster left Carlisle Pier, Kingstown, bound for Holyhead carrying six-hundred and ninety-seven passengers and seventy-six crew (under the command of Captain William BIRCH). Of the passengers, there were one-hundred and eighty civilians, twenty-two postal sorters from Dublin Post Office, and most of the remaining four-hundred and ninety-five personnel were military, going on, or returning, from leave.

Just before 1000 hrs, having travelled about sixteen miles, a torpedo fired from the German submarine UB-123 struck the port side where the postal sorting room was located, causing an explosion, before ripping out through the starboard side. In an attempt to return to port, the listing Leinster turned back to Kingstown, and by this time Lifeboats were launched. Another torpedo struck the ship on the starboard side, causing massive destruction, with the ship sinking shortly afterwards. Officially, five hundred and one people died in the sinking, however, recent research has traced the names of five-hundred and twenty-nine casualties.

Violet is listed on the War Dead Memorial at Tullow Church of Ireland, Brighton Road, Carrickmines, also on the Hollybrook Memorial, Southampton, and her body interred in grave No. 146 in Kilternan with an MI reading: "Sophia Violet BARRETT, VAD, the St John Ambulance Brigade; younger daughter of Samuel BARRETT JP, of Ballintava, County of Galway whose four years war service closed the 10th October 1918 when returning to Duty in France on R.M.S. Leinster Torpedoed off the Irish Coast."

In the British Journal of Nursing of 26 Oct 1918, she was described as "beloved niece of Mrs W. H. WILSON, Carrickmines House, Carrickmines." Three of her four male cousins, the sons of her uncle, William, were killed during the Great War, and the fourth son, Capt John Hugh WILSON, RFA, was withdrawn from the front on compassionate grounds.

While Violet was living in Dublin she attended Tully Church, Foxrock, and in 1919 members of the Carrickmines SJAA, Nursing Division, presented the Church with a silver chalice bearing the inscription onits base that reads, "To the glory of God and in memory of Sophia Violet BARRETT, torpedoed in R.M.S.Leinster October 1918, when returning to duty in France. Presented to Tully Church by her fellow members of Carrickmines St. John Ambulance Nursing Division." The chalice is used in Church every Sunday.

Among those who died when the Leinster sank, was nineteen year old Josephine CARR, a shorthand typist from Cork, who was the first member of the Wrens (Women's Royal Naval Service) to be killed on active service.

Violet's was mentioned on p. 178 of the 1919 entries in the England & Wales, National Probate Calendar (Index of Wills and Administrations),1861 - 1941, where a summary of her will appeared, proved the following year in Dublin, which confirmed her death at sea, with probate granted to Army General George HENRY."

<br clear="all">

But what shape is the wheel and what does it look like? This work has been handed to the Royal College of Nursing - what does it comprise and what plans do they have for it? Until this and similar research is in the public domain people will continue to tread a similar path, and quite rightly so.

Sue

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I have a full list of WW1 serving female casualties. Why do you need to know?

Hello Jim

Sorry, accidentally overlooked your message in replying to Sue.

I am writing short [or long - depending on what I find] biographies for each of them, would be interested in comparing databases!

Fiona

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Hello Jim

Sorry, accidentally overlooked your message in replying to Sue.

I am writing short [or long - depending on what I find] biographies for each of them, would be interested in comparing databases!

Fiona

Sue, I have already done biographies of most of them them. Jim

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[quote name=fionam' timestamp='1301761484' post='1572596'

My main interest is the eight nurses, as I am working on a project tracing all Military Nursing staff who died in the Great War.

Hi Fiona,

I was very interested to hear of your project regarding the compilation of biographies of Nursing Staff who died during WW1. I have been trying to research a VAD by the name of Gertrude Lucinda Roskell who died on 31st October, 1915 and who is buried in Alexandria(Chatby)Military and War Memorial Cemetery. I have all the usual details and even a photograph of her but not a great deal else, I wonder perchance if you have compiled a biography for GLR?

Any help would be appreciated.

Regards, Robert

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I have been trying to research a VAD by the name of Gertrude Lucinda Roskell who died on 31st October, 1915 and who is buried in Alexandria(Chatby)Military and War Memorial Cemetery. I have all the usual details and even a photograph of her but not a great deal else, I wonder perchance if you have compiled a biography for GLR?

Any help would be appreciated.

Regards, Robert

Robert,

I checked what I had, and have added a little bit more, partly from your bringing my attention to her, TYVM :o)

I tend to write up my biographies based on the genealogy, to offer a feel for their background, and if you hadn't posted a couple of years ago, I wouldn't have know she died from Appendicitis ... poor gal. I'm a little intrigued as to why she'd moved to London by 1911, apparently on her own. Have to say the family kept disappearing into mid-air, particularly her grandmother, after whom she received her middle name.

Her sister Eileen Mary ROSKELL seems to have been a Nurse, described as "spinster, late of Fairfield Hospital, Hitchen" in a small obit dated 9 Feb 1977, making her about ninety-five.

I also notice one reference had her death as 1 Nov 1915 [?]

There's a bit of a titter over her father's place of birth ...

Regards,

Fiona

Gertude LucindaROSKELL

(1878 – 1915)

Died 31 Oct 1915 VAD Nurse Appendicitis

Gertrude was born at6 Clive Place, Penarth, GLA, South Wales to Commercial Clerk, John BurrowROSKELL (1852-1886), and his wife Mary Gertrude [nee WILLIAMS] (1853-). Lucinda was the name of her Grandmother,Lucinda ME (1822-), described as a ‘Lady,’ who was born in Dublin,Ireland.

Her father wasoften recorded as born at sea, [or Bornat, Sea as the 1871c recorded, however,on the 1861c it states he was born at Cape Horn], and his family were living onthe Isle of Man, at 3 Mona Terrace, Conchan.

In 1881 the familywere living at Penarth, along with a maiden Aunt, Mary WILLIAMS and two Servants,Josepha and Catherine. In 1891 hermother was widowed, working as a Professor of Music, and she and her sister,Eileen (1881-), were living at 19 Windsor Terrace, Penarth. By 1901 Gertrude and her Mother had moved toHove, SSX, and two brothers were also recorded on the census, John Douglas(1880-), and Clifford (1885-).

By 1911 Gertrude,had moved to St Marylebone, London.

Whilst working asa VAD Nurse attached to 17 General Hospital, based at Alexandria, she suffered Appendicitisand died, and was buried at the Alexandria (Chatby) Military Cemetery, plot Q.538.

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Fiona, you may find it worthwhile to paste your text into Notepad first, as the formatting gets garbled if you paste directly into the "ADD REPLY" section.

Using Add Reply also avoids quoting all of the previous post.

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Robert,

I had a little mystery, and have just checked, her mother remarried, Carl Kollmann ELDERHORST on 29 Jan 1903 in London, and they were living in Marylebone in 1911. Hitchin also ties in, as Carl died there in 1929.

Hate loose ends ;)

Aye,

Fiona

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