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Northampton Regt WW1


Labeline
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Hello

I am researching my Grandfather William Stanley Carpenter who joined the Northampton Regt as Private 41156 on 25/10/1916 when he was just 17. He was posted to France where he was severely injured, losing a foot which eventually led to the amputation of his leg below the knee. I would love to find out where he was injured and any other information about his short war service. He was discharged Regulation 392 XV1 2A1 on 25/3/1919 as unfit for service. I cannot find his service record and assume it must have been amongst those destroyed in 1940. I only have his medal record. If anyone can help or guide me where to look I would be extremely grateful

Regards

Paul

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  • 1 month later...

Paul,

My apologies for missing this earlier.

William Stanley Carpenter served with the Northamptons in the 7th Battalion (24th Division).

He was part of a group of men transferred to what had originally been the 51st Graduated Battalion of the Bedfordshire Regiment on 23-2-1918 (at that point the battalion (which was a UK based training battalion) was at Brocton Camp, Cannock Chase. At this point they were given a Bedfordshire Regiment number - William Carpenter's number would have been 51660. A few weeks later this group moved overseas, and the men were posted to the 8th Battalion of the Bedfordshire Regiment on 1st April 1918.

The next day they embarked to France via Folkestone and Boulogne and arrived at "L" Infantry Base Depot at Etaples on 3rd April 1918. Since there were other battalions in more urgent need of men than the 8th Bedfords, these men were transferred to the Northamptonshire Regiment on 4th April 1918. They joined the 7th Northamptons on 12th April 1918. This group were given Northamptonshire Regiment numbers ranging from 41141 to 41196.

Steve.

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  • 6 months later...

If you are still around, Paul.

I've just found William Carpenter on a casualty list (dated 4-6-1918) that looks like it refers to 17 men of the 7th Battalion who were wounded on 23 April 1918 when a German aeroplane dropped bombs on huts in which the battalion were billetted at Houdain (near Bruay).

Steve.

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  • 6 years later...

Apologies for not spotting this 7 years ago. I honestly cannot believe it is that long since I posted this enquiry. This information is amazing as we were always told that he lost his foot at the Somme but should have realised that as he didn't join up until October 1916 that would be impossible. It makes much more sense that it happened later. He lost his heel and eventually the lower part of his leg. I am back in the fray now so any information you can give me as to where I can find this information would be of huge interest, especially to my father who is 88.

 

I have not ticked the box to be notified of replies!

many thanks

Paul

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  • Admin

There is a page from a 'progress report' on Find My Past - http://search.findmypast.co.uk/record?id=gbm%2fwo363-4%2fsupp%2f385521

 

States that on 3 May 18 he was dangerously ill (but could be visited) in No 20 General Hospital at Dannes Camiers.

 

Craig

Edited by ss002d6252
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6 minutes ago, Labeline said:

Craig. Thanks for that. Unfortunately I don't have a credit on Find My Past. Maybe I should buy some credits

 

Paul

If you have an email address you've not used before you should be able to get a 14day free trial...

Craig

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Just bought a few credits and downloaded it. Going to see if I can find his Service Record which I have never been able to trace.

 

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I have looked for my grandfather service record without success always supposing it was destroyed in the Second World War. With the new information above I am wondering which service number I should look under, his Bedfordshire Regt number or his later Northamptonshire Regt number

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Technically, he did lose his foot on the Somme, just not in the traditional sense of the word 'Somme' (i.e. 1916); the 1918 Spring Offensives saw the German army push the British and French back across the Somme battlefields, so his battalion were on the the Somme when he was wounded in April 1918.

Edited by steve fuller
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On 16/06/2010 at 21:45, Stebie9173 said:

If you are still around, Paul.

I've just found William Carpenter on a casualty list (dated 4-6-1918) that looks like it refers to 17 men of the 7th Battalion who were wounded on 23 April 1918 when a German aeroplane dropped bombs on huts in which the battalion were billetted at Houdain (near Bruay).

Steve.

If you see this could you tell me where I can find the casualty lists. Thanks

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  • 8 months later...
On 16/06/2010 at 20:45, Stebie9173 said:

If you are still around, Paul.

I've just found William Carpenter on a casualty list (dated 4-6-1918) that looks like it refers to 17 men of the 7th Battalion who were wounded on 23 April 1918 when a German aeroplane dropped bombs on huts in which the battalion were billetted at Houdain (near Bruay).

Steve.

I have just re read the post and was amazed. The date my grandfather was wounded was the same day my Great Uncle was killed at Zeebrugge in the raid on the submarine pens. Frederick Robert Scott was on the raiding party disembarking from HMS Vindictive and died on the Mole there.

Edited by Labeline
Spelling mistake
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