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Tonym

Scottish Women's Hospitals 1914-19

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Tonym

Can anyone offer any details and locations of the Scottish Women's Hospital, I believe established in Glasgow, spurned by the War Office in WW I and gladly accepted by the French Government for service in France.

Tony M

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HERITAGE PLUS

Tony

This is from the mother-site

Scottish Women's Hospitals

Founded by the extraordinary Dr Elsie Maud Inglis, who was not only a suffragette but an early qualified female medical doctor. Her idea was for the Scottish Suffrage Societies to fund and staff a medical hospital; the military authorities told her to "Go home and sit still". Not to be held down, Inglis pressed forward. The first Unit moved to northern Serbia in January 1915 and by 1918 there were 14 such units, working with each of the Allied armies except the British. Dr Inglis was taken prisoner of war in Serbia in 1915, but was repatriated. She immediately moved with another unit to Russia. Evacuated after the Revolution, she died the day after her return home in November 1917, in Newcastle.

Dave

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Tonym

Dave

Thanks for reply. I tried earlier on the net but Welcome Foundation had changed the location of its page, I complained to the Webmaster and Hey Presto the page arrived. But thanks for your reply

Tony M

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HERITAGE PLUS

Tony

Hopefully you have got all you need from Welcome. However just in case here is a list of some of the location at which SWH units served. Source - 'The Quality of Mercy - Women at War Serbia 1915-18' by Monica Krippner (David & Charles 1980)

Kragujevac, Krusevac, Lazarevac, Mladenovac, Valjevo, Ostrovo, Vranje, Sarajevo, Skopje, Ajaccio,Vertekop.

A History of the SWH was published by Hodder & Stoughton in 1919.

Dave

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Malcolm
Tony

This is from the mother-site

Scottish Women's Hospitals

Founded by the extraordinary Dr Elsie Maud Inglis, who was not only a suffragette but an early qualified female medical doctor. Her idea was for the Scottish Suffrage Societies to fund and staff a medical hospital; the military authorities told her to "Go home and sit still". Not to be held down, Inglis pressed forward. The first Unit moved to northern Serbia in January 1915 and by 1918 there were 14 such units, working with each of the Allied armies except the British. Dr Inglis was taken prisoner of war in Serbia in 1915, but was repatriated. She immediately moved with another unit to Russia. Evacuated after the Revolution, she died the day after her return home in November 1917, in Newcastle.

Dave

Her Memorial in St Giles Kirk, Edinburgh

Aye

Malcolm

post-6-1083698014.jpg

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Malcolm

Another image of SWH.

Aye

Malcolm

post-6-1083698354.jpg

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HERITAGE PLUS

Dr Elsie Inglis in the uniform she designed herself of Commander of the SWH.

She was decorated by the Serbs with the Order of the White Eagle (first time ever awarded to a woman), the Order of St. Sava and the Order of the White Eagle with Swords.

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Tonym

:D Thanks David and Malcolm will have to get on with some reading now

Tony

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Guest Brummy
Tony

This is from the mother-site

Scottish Women's Hospitals

Founded by the extraordinary Dr Elsie Maud Inglis, who was not only a suffragette but an early qualified female medical doctor. Her idea was for the Scottish Suffrage Societies to fund and staff a medical hospital; the military authorities told her to "Go home and sit still". Not to be held down, Inglis pressed forward. The first Unit moved to northern Serbia in January 1915 and by 1918 there were 14 such units, working with each of the Allied armies except the British. Dr Inglis was taken prisoner of war in Serbia in 1915, but was repatriated. She immediately moved with another unit to Russia. Evacuated after the Revolution, she died the day after her return home in November 1917, in Newcastle.

Dave

Hi,

Just a point of order. Dr Inglis Was a Suffergist and not a suffragette as claimed here. This may sound like a case of Pedentry but it is an important distinction. This distinction became most obvious at the outbrake of WW1, when the various organisations of the sufferagists movment anounced their intention to encourage their members to help the war effort in such ways as becoming nurses, joining the millitary, etc. This was the time when the breakaway extreemists of Emmeline Pankhurst's Womens Social and Political Union (Suffragettes) decided that they would stand on street corners and hand out white feathers to men not in uniform. As far as I know Dr Inglis was never a member or supporter of the WSPU and to call her a Sufferagette is to misrepresent her.

Yours (placing his head on the metaforical block argument wise) Brum

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Tonym

Tnanks Brum

I understand the difference, even my daughter said she was a Suffragette, I can now put her in her place.

Cheers Tony

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