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Remembered Today:

Rev. William D. T. Black


Strachan
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Hello all,

I was hoping that I could once more use your knowledge.

I'm currently preparing an opening service for my BB Company. As Remembrance day is coming up I thought I would look at what some of the towns BB officers did during the war.

One of these men was Rev. William Duncan Thomas Black. He served for a year in the general ranks before being made Chaplain (4th Class) to the Cameron Highlanders. Sadly he was killed on the 22nd August 1917. According to the reports he was killed instantly when shrapnel from shelling pierced his heart. He is buried at Brandhoek New Cemetery No. 3.

Anyway, I have all that information, but have no idea what battle he was fighting in when killed. I'd make a guess at Passchendaele.

Would anybody like to hazard a guess?

regards

Strachan

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This maybe of interest to you, It only applies if he was part of the 15th (Scottish Div) who were in action on that date, as there is no mention of which Bn of the Camerons he was attached to, I can only surmise.

http://1914-1918.invisionzone.com/forums/i...showtopic=90849

The 6th Bn Cameron Highlanders were part of the same 45th Brigade as the 13th Royal Scots, the 7th Bn were part of their sister 44th Brigade.

http://www.1914-1918.net/15div.htm

This is from the War Diary of Robert Lindsay McKay of the 11th Bn A&SH also part of the 45th Bde.

http://lu.softxs.ch/mackay/Text/Diary5.html

Edited to read: I found on SDGW and it says he was attached to 7th Cameron Highlanders, so he was 44th Brigade so would probably have been in the same area, or been with the 6th Bn if they had no Chaplain.

WILLIAM DUNCAN THOMSON BLACK

Regiment, Corps etc: Royal Army Chaplains' Department

Battalion/etc

Surname: Black

Christian Name: William Duncan Thomson

Initials: W D T

Decoration

Rank: REV

Died Date: 22/08/1917

Died How: Killed in action

Supplementary Notes: (ATT 7THCAM HDRS)

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This maybe of interest to you, It only applies if he was part of the 15th (Scottish Div) who were in action on that date, as there is no mention of which Bn of the Camerons he was attached to, I can only surmise.

http://1914-1918.invisionzone.com/forums/i...showtopic=90849

The 6th Bn Cameron Highlanders were part of the same 45th Brigade as the 13th Royal Scots, the 7th Bn were part of their sister 44th Brigade.

http://www.1914-1918.net/15div.htm

This is from the War Diary of Robert Lindsay McKay of the 11th Bn A&SH also part of the 45th Bde.

http://lu.softxs.ch/mackay/Text/Diary5.html

Edited to read: I found on SDGW and it says he was attached to 7th Cameron Highlanders, so he was 44th Brigade so would probably have been in the same area, or been with the 6th Bn if they had no Chaplain.

<H1 class=heading>WILLIAM DUNCAN THOMSON BLACK</H1> Regiment, Corps etc

Royal Army Chaplains' Department

Battalion/etc

Surname

Black

Christian Name

William Duncan Thomson

Initials

W D T

Decoration

Rank

REV

Died Date

22/08/1917

Died How

Killed in action

Supplementary Notes

(ATT 7THCAM HDRS)

Thank you for this information it is greatly appreciated. Sadly the press did not give his division, just that he was in the Cameron Highlanders. I do, however, have an account from an (unnamed) Chaplain of a Highland regiment:

"We moved up together very early to the posts allocated to us in the attack of yesterday. His post was a little in advance, and we each left each other found our time soon occupied with the wounded. A few hours later he came in again, then declared his intention of proceeding up the line. We were going together along a track that was from time to time heavily shelled, when a shell bust close to us. A fragment of the shell pierced his heart killing him instantly".

They give us all that information, but no Battalion.

Would he have a medal card being a Chaplain? I could alwats check that?

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Thank you for this information it is greatly appreciated. Sadly the press did not give his division, just that he was in the Cameron Highlanders. I do, however, have an account from an (unnamed) Chaplain of a Highland regiment:

"We moved up together very early to the posts allocated to us in the attack of yesterday. His post was a little in advance, and we each left each other found our time soon occupied with the wounded. A few hours later he came in again, then declared his intention of proceeding up the line. We were going together along a track that was from time to time heavily shelled, when a shell bust close to us. A fragment of the shell pierced his heart killing him instantly".

They give us all that information, but no Battalion.

Would he have a medal card being a Chaplain? I could alwats check that?

If you read my Edited post above, he was attached to 7th Battalion Cameron Highlanders, 44th Brigade, 15th (Scottish) Division.

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The Son of William B and Elizabeth Bain Cochrane He was born on the 10th March 1881 at Glasgow Educated at John Street School and High School . he studied at University of Glasgow where he obtained an M A in 1903 after further study at Glasgow he became a Missionary in Canada in 1904 Licenced by the Presbytery of Glasgow in 1906 he was assistant Minister at Coweaddens Ordained and inducted to fraserburgh South on 23 November 1906 Translated and inducted to Rutherglen on 23 February 1913 The husband of Janet (Jenny) Liddle Black (nee Cunningham ) who he Married on 6th November 1907 of 10 Leven Street Pollokshields Glasgow he was Killed in Action in Belgium on the 22August 1917 aged 36 he is buried in Brandhock New Military Cemetery No 3 Belgium Grave Ref 11.A.18.

Peter.

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Thanks for your replies.

Thanks for the link to the NA page, rough diamond.

Peter, where did you find the bio for him? That is brilliant. I didn't know that he was a missionary in Canada. I was also having trouble pin pointing who his parents were (now I can find out which part of Glasgow he was born to). Thanks for your help.

Here is a (bad quality) picture of him:

RevWDTBlack.jpg

regards

Strachan

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His MIC states theatre of war first served in as France and date of entry September 1916. It shows his entitlement to the War and Victory medals. The reverse of the card states medals applied for by a Mrs Jenny L [?] Black on 9/4/1921.

Her address at that time is listed as what looks like 10 Leverr Street [poor handwriting] Pollockshields, Glasgow.

The entries for unit are on 2 seperate lines and the second one states att 7/ Cam Highs C.F. but there is NO service number. [using my ancestry subscription I saved a copy :whistle: ]

ttfn

Matt

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Hi there

The Divisional History of the 15th Division says of the 7th Camerons on the 22 August 1917;

"The two leading companies of the Camerons advanced up the slopes of Hill 35, but were held up on reaching the crest by machine gun fire from Gallipoli, and dug in where they were.

On the left of the Camerons the platoons of the 9th Gordons, who, under Captain Lumsden had come up to consolidate Hill 35, had reached Pomern Redoubt. and proceeded towards Hill 35.

The actions of the 7th Camerons and the six platoons of the 9th Gordons attached to that battalion was of the greatest value. They secured and maintained a footing on the ridge."

Hope this helps

Patrick

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Thank you all for your feedback - it is very appreciated.

Patrick - You will have to excuse my ignorance, but isn't Gallipoli in Turkey? He definately fell in Belgium, and is buried there in the Brandhoek New Cemetery No. 3. Does this mean he was not serving with his unit at the time of his death?

Matt: Thanks for the details of the Mic ;). Jenny Black was William's widow. They also had two small sons. She had more than his medals to remember him by. He was minister of the Free Church in Rutherglen. After his death the church hall was called 'The Black Halls' in his memory. They are still in use today. I'm also led to believe that their is a memorial stone inside the church for him.

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Hi there

Sorry, I should have made it more clear. This Gallipoli was the name given to a position on the battlefield at 3rd Ypres. On 22 August 1917 this position was close to the Divisional boundary between the 15th (Scottish) Division and the 61st Division on their left. It is situated on the right hand side of the battlefield to the east of Hill 35, which in turn is about 3 miles eat of the Menin Gate in Ypres.

All the best

Patrick

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Hi there

Sorry, I should have made it more clear. This Gallipoli was the name given to a position on the battlefield at 3rd Ypres. On 22 August 1917 this position was close to the Divisional boundary between the 15th (Scottish) Division and the 61st Division on their left. It is situated on the right hand side of the battlefield to the east of Hill 35, which in turn is about 3 miles eat of the Menin Gate in Ypres.

All the best

Patrick

Ah right. Thanks for the clarification. Now you can see why I came here for help. :)

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  • 3 weeks later...

Post #6 by Marine Pete is almost identical to a bio in 'Greater Love' by Revd David Youngson, a member of this forum. A minor difference is that his 1906 appointment was at Cowcaddens, not Coweaddans.

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Hanad

As I said earlier, the note already posted about WDT Black is evidently taken from David Youngson's book or from the same source.

'Audax' is the man you want.

D

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